We use cookies on this site. By browsing our site you agree to our use of cookies. Close this message Find out more

Home > School of Management home > Events > Research Seminar: Professor Mark Exworthy
More in this section Events articles

Research Seminar: Professor Mark Exworthy

Date(s)
13/02/2013 (12:00-14:00)
Description
MarkExworthyphoto
Paper Title: 'Managing professionals by making performance more transparent'

Speakers: Professor Mark Exworthy (School of Management) and Professor Jon Gabe (Centre for Criminology and Sociology)

The relationship between professionalism and managerialism has evolved over time, from binary tensions to more contingent responses, mediated by the type of managerial challenge, local contextual factors and professional trajectories. Recent challenges have revolved around clinical performance, previously the domain of professionals themselves.  One illustration of this shift is the public reporting of performance. Public reporting has been pioneered by cardiac surgery, through publishing online the mortality rates associated with named surgeons. This paper examines the changes and mechanisms by which public reporting has been implemented in England, drawing on evidence from cardiac surgeons, hospital managers and national policy-makers. It identifies fractures within the profession and limited use of disclosed information. The paper concludes that the mediation between professionalism and managerialism is contingent upon surgeons’ previous role in audit, the nature of surgery, and the limitations of public reporting. This case-study explains the evolving reconfiguration of professionalism and managerialism.


   
 
 
 

Comment on this page

Did you find the information you were looking for? Is there a broken link or content that needs updating? Let us know so we can improve the page.

Note: If you need further information or have a question that cannot be satisfied by this page, please call our switchboard on +44 (0)1784 434455.

This window will close when you submit your comment.

Add Your Feedback
Close