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More in this section Postgraduate research

PhD scholarships

The Department has a number of funded scholarships, either open in all areas of the Department's research interests or in specific domains (depending on the sponsors). 

All scholarships are subject to eligibility conditions and are awarded on a competitive basis according to academic merit and possibly an interview. We particularly welcome female applicants as they are under-represented among our PhD student population.

For the open scholarships in the Department, all research applicants to whom we have made an offer will be considered for financial assistance. In 2016, the deadline for open scholarship applications is the 10th of April. Successful candidates will be informed by the 6th of May.

Teaching Assistantships are available to MPhil/PhD students in the Department – research students are encouraged to undertake demonstrating and teaching tasks, and to take the Certificate in Teaching Skills offered by the College. Teaching Assistantships are part-time only, i.e. for a limited number of hours so as not to interfere with study. 

The current available scholarships are:

Open Scholarships

Applications are invited for fully funded PhD studentships in any of the Department's research groups: Algorithms and Applications; Bioinformatics; Machine Learning; Distributed and Global Computing; Software Language Engineering; and Type Theory.

The studentships are for three years and include a stipend of £16,296 per year plus a Home/EU fee waiver. Applicants are expected to have obtained a good degree in Computer Science or a cognate discipline, and must obtain the support of a potential supervisor in the Department prior to submitting an application. 

Information about supervisors can be found here.  You are welcome (indeed, encouraged) to discuss a research topic with a supervisor prior to submitting your application.

How to apply:

Interested candidates should apply as soon as possible using the University's  online application system.  Please read carefully all the information on the application process including English language requirements.   

You will need to upload the following items:

  1. a research topic/area and the name of a potential supervisor; 

  2. a covering letter describing your reasons for wishing to pursue a PhD in the proposed area, incuding why you think that you are qualified to do research in that area; 

  3. a research proposal where you expand on your research topic: why the topic is important, what is the state of the art in the area, and what are the research contributions that you would like to make beyond the state of the art – this does not need to be too long but it should contain enough information for us to make a judgement on the viability of carrying out such a research project in the Department;  

  4. a current CV; 

  5. any documents proving your actual or expected degree classifications, as well as results of any previous University examinations; 

  6. two academic references. 

Closing Date:  Midnight, 10th April 2016.

Starting Date: September 2016.

 

Leverhulme Magna-Carta Doctoral Scholarship in Econometrics

Title: Market Manipulation and High Frequency Trading in Cryptocurrencies and other Electronic Markets
Supervisors: Professors Alessio Sancetta (Economics) and Volodya Vovk (Computer Science)
Start date: September 2016
Duration: 3 years
Annual Stipend: £16,296 p.a.

This is a unique opportunity for a high-achieving graduate student to be fully funded to carry out research on Market Manipulation and High Frequency Trading in Cryptocurrencies and other Electronic Markets. The successful candidate will work with staff from the Economics Department and Computer Science Department at Royal Holloway University of London. This studentship will enable the recipient to develop academic-standard research skills and a deep understanding of electronic markets in practice with potential collaboration with external firms.

Project Overview

The goal of the project is to formally define market manipulation and abuse in high frequency trading from a statistical point of view, and to test whether some electronic markets are prone to market manipulation. In the specific context, market manipulation means that some economic agent sends orders to the market in order to create a fictitious snapshot of the market conditions. The intention is to induce other agents to place orders that will result in a profit for the market manipulator. Such “manipulating” orders are fictitious because they are unlikely to be filled, but create a false view of the demand and supply schedule in the market. This practice is often referred to as spoofing. Such practice is unlawful in regulated electronic markets, and discouraged in unregulated markets such as foreign exchange. However, trading in cryptocurrency such as bitcoins happens in completely unregulated markets where such practice can freely be used. Data availability in these markets provides a unique comparative framework on which to devise theories, statistics and tests for market manipulation.

The project will attempt to define the framework for the study of market manipulation using modern inferential procedures under weak assumptions. In this respect, the techniques will have to be robust to dependence and heterogeneity in high frequency data. To avoid functional misspecification, but retain clear interpretability of results, heavy use of semiparametric methods will be needed. It is expected that the topic will require to advance economic understanding of market manipulation. Using Karl Popper view that theories need to be falsifiable in order to be scientific, the project will rely on use of large data sets and related statistical testing procedures.

Requirements

The ideal candidate should have a strong interest in financial markets, be very mathematically oriented, and willing to work with large datasets. An Msc (expected by Sept. 2016) in either Econometrics, Statistics, or Machine learning together with knowledge of either Matlab, R or Python is required.

How to Apply

You should apply via Royal Holloway’s online application system. Please read carefully all the information on the application process including English language requirements. In addition to completing the postgraduate application form, your application should include:
• A copy of your first degree and postgraduate transcripts.
• A current CV.
• An optional 1 page statement outlining your interest in the research and highlighting any experience that might be relevant.

Closing Date: 15 April 2016.

For informal inquiries about the position, please contact Professor Alessio Sancetta.

 

Leverhulme Magna-Carta Doctoral Scholarship in Conflict Analysis

Title: Casualties of War: Boosting Accuracy of Conflict Analysis via Economics Modeling and Data Mining

Supervisors: Professor Michael Spagat (Economics) and Dr Gregory Chockler and Dr Zhiyuan Luo (Computer Science)
Start date: September 2016
Duration: 3 years
Annual Stipend: £16,296 p.a.

This is a unique opportunity for a high-achieving graduate student to be fully funded to carry out research at the cutting edge of both economics and computer science. This PhD will be supervised jointly by members of the economics and computer science departments at RHUL and the recipient will acquire strong skill sets in both fields, a rare combination that should place him/her in great demand.

This scholarship is fully funded as part of the Magna Carta Doctoral Training Centre supported by the Leverhulme Trust. 

Project Overview

The broad idea behind this research programme is to marry economic analysis with methods of big-data analysis, particularly large-scale data mining. Economics gives us a framework for analyzing the behaviours and strategic motivations of humans that participate in the generation and collection of data while computer science provides leverage to gather, organise, and analyze large quantities of data.

The project on casualties of war is a particularly research-intensive part of the full programme that enjoys co-operation from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program and Iraq Body Count, two of the most important operations in the world for building human-driven conflict event data. These links will give us a massive “ground truth” of accurate transformations of journalistic articles into coded events associated with a wide range of attributes, such as times, locations, perpetrators, weapons and casualties. Indeed, we already have a prototype system that performs these tasks well on the Iraq Body Count database and media archive.

We would like the student to extend the work beyond systems based on relatively reliable media reports into applications where people are or may be actively fabricating data. For example, recent research has suggested that many interviews supposedly conducted in international public opinion surveys are fabricated, something which economic theory might predict given the incentive structures within which interviewers operate in these surveys. Similarly, data gathered from social media on conflicts in Libya and Syria cannot automatically be considered reliable and there is a large potential payoff from systems that can sort real reports from fake ones.

Academic Requirements

We are looking for a student with strong interest in economics and openness to working with big data and learning computer science methods or a person with a strong interest in computer science and openness to learning and integrating economic theory into their work.

How to Apply

Application procedure Informal enquires can be made, or further details about the research project’s scope discussed, by contacting Prof Mike Spagat , Dr Gregory Chockler or Dr Zhiyuan Luo.

You should apply via Royal Holloway’s online application system. In addition to completing the postgraduate application form, your application should include:

• A 1-2 page statement outlining your interest in the research project.

• A copy of your first degree and postgraduate qualifications.

• A current CV.

Closing Date: Tuesday 5 April 2016.

 

Leverhulme Magna-Carta Doctoral Scholarship in On-line Privacy

Title: Observing the Observers: Network Transparency in a Connected World
Supervisors: Professor Kostas Stathis (Computer Science) and Mr Robert Jago (Law)
Start date: September 2016
Duration: 3 years
Annual Stipend: £16,296 p.a and includes Home/EU fees.

This is an exciting opportunity for an ambitious graduate student to carry out research in multi-agent models to support electronic privacy. The successful candidate will work with staff from the Computer Science Department and the School of Law at Royal Holloway University of London. This studentship will enable the candidate to develop academic-standard research skills and a deep understanding of privacy law and how to enforce this law using techniques from multi-agent systems with potential collaboration with external firms and start-ups.

This scholarship is fully funded as part of the Magna Carta Doctoral Training Centre supported by the Leverhulme Trust.  

Project Overview

The goal of this project is to study new mechanisms for supporting the privacy of electronic transactions over large computer networks. The mechanisms to be studied will be modelled using architectures, protocols and models originating in multi-agent systems research and their associated deployment infrastructures. It is anticipated that agents deployed to support privacy will encapsulate knowledge about privacy policies on the data exchanged in an electronic transaction, maintain provenance of information as logs of data transfers and monitor access to this information in the long term to avoid privacy violations. It is also anticipated that agents will communicate with other agents to report violations and to maintain the required accountability between all relevant parties.

The student will be hosted in the DICE Lab, which conducts research in Distributed and Intelligent Computing Environments using Agents and Multi-agent Systems.

Requirements

Applicants should have a first or upper-second class honours degree or an MSc in Computer Science, Engineering, Mathematics or a related discipline and excellent understanding of computational logic together with software development skills, preferrably in Prolog and/or Java. Among desirable skills are experience with agent architectures, agent protocols, the formalisation of legal rules as well as the application of computers in the domain of the law.

How to Apply

Interested candidates should apply as soon as possible using the University's online application system.  Please read carefully all the information on the application process including English language requirements.

While completing the postgraduate application form please include also:
• your most recent CV; and
• a personal statement outlining your interest in the area of privacy and highlighting any relevant experience you have with multi-agent system models, architectures and technologies.

Closing Date:  15 April 2016.

For informal inquiries about the position, please contact Professor Kostas Stathis.


Other scholarships may be available: please check the University's scholarships page. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  
 
 
 

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