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Schools liaison and outreach

The Classics department is keen to maintain and develop links with schools and colleges, both within the UK and overseas.

As part of our integrated outreach strategy we can offer schools and colleges in the UK:

  • dedicated workshops and talks on your site
  • opportunities to visit our department and the College with groups of pupils
  • advice and guidance for teachers on teaching classical culture and ancient history
  • Undergraduate Taster Day events for post-GCSE pupils
  • the Royal Holloway Classical Society’s annual Classics Day celebration
  • contributions to College outreach events

 

At your school

Workshops and talks for schools 

As part of our commitment to schools, we are able to visit schools to give talks or lead workshops on a wide range of subjects.

Here is a sample of what we have currently on offer, but please e-mail us if you have a specific request, and you will find that we are often able to offer talks tailored to your  needs! Please note however that it's not always possible for us to be available on all preferred dates and times, so it is best to get in touch with us as far in advance as possible.

Also, please do not be disappointed is a member of staff happens to be absent on research leave: if your first choice of talk or lecturer is not available, we can often provide an equally interesting alternative.

For more information, please contact the member of staff offering a particular title or topic (e-mail addresses below)

OR the Classics department Outreach Officer, Dr Christos Kremmydas  

(list of topics updated October 2017

Studying Classics/Classical Studies/Ancient History at university

A general talk offered by Professor Richard Alston, Dr Richard Hawley, Dr Christos Kremmydas (Outreach Officer), Dr Nick Lowe (Admissions Tutor), and Professor Ahuvia Kahane.

 

Professor Richard Alston

History and Monumentalism: Augustus and his memory

The House of Augustus: Politics, Power and Architecture

Roman Alexandria

The Roman House (suitable for GCSE or earlier)

Politics and Passion: Nero's Principate

Cleopatra: Roman Queen

Sibling marriage in Roman Egypt: a new approach to incestuous marriage

The Rise and Fall of Civilization: The Roman City

Gaius Caligula: Lunatic or Racing Enthusiast?

Nero: Sinners and Suicides and the Opposition to Nero

Romanisation and the Roman Army

Email Richard

Dr Siobhan Chomse

Sublime cities in Virgil’s Aeneid

Out of the darkness and into the light: death and the self in Seneca’s Letters (51, 53, 57)

Tacitus and Tiberius: a sublime emperor?

Shakin’ all over: earthquakes in the Roman imagination

The wild child of Roman epic: Lucan, on coming after Virgil  

Email Siobhan


Dr Liz Gloyn 

Thinking philosophically in the Roman World

Seneca: Philosopher, Politician, Playwright

Living and dying in ancient Rome

The Roman Family

Women’s lives in ancient Rome

Does having a beard make you a philosopher?

Classics and Film – A Survey (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips)

Hollywood and Epic (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips)

How Do You Look At Medusa? Hollywood’s Monster (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips)

Other topics, available by request: Stoicism; the Roman novel; classical reception. 

Talks also available by arrangement on the year’s set GCSE and A-level Latin texts

Email Liz

Dr Richard Hawley

Why learn Ancient Languages?

The employability skills gained from a classical degree

Topics (exact title by arrangement):

 Classical Greek and Roman concepts of gender

 Women's life in ancient Greece/Rome

 Greek Tragedy, especially women; also gods, chorus, stagecraft, etc.

 Greek Comedy, especially women, audience, types of humour, etc. 

The modern reception of ancient women in films, novels and poetry

Women in Greek literature (e.g. Homer)

Women in Latin literature (e.g. love poets, Livy)

What is ancient heroism?

Ancient biography and autobiography

Greek views of Rome and the Romans

Email Richard

Professor Ahuvia Kahane

Epic, Memory, Mortality – Homer and the traditions of Epic

Ancient Texts and Modern Art

Slavery and Class Structure – Between Ancient and Modern

Modern Critical Thinking and Ancient Literature

Ancient Greek Lyric Poets, Eros, and Social Order

Classics and Cinema

Email Ahuvia

Dr Zena Kamash

Not just dormice: eating and drinking in the Roman world (linked to her public engagement project - find out more on the project's Twitter account @NotJustDormice , website or Facebook account)

Health and hygiene in the Roman world (esp. toilets and bathing)

The archaeology of Roman Britain

Religion in Roman Britain

Life and living conditions in Roman cities

Pompeii and Herculaneum

Roman Syria/Jordan

Using material culture in teaching: how can objects enhance understandings of the ancient world?

Introducing archaeology: what does an archaeologist do?

Email Zena

Dr Christos Kremmydas

Who killed Philip II of Macedon? 

Alexander the Great and Athens

Alexander the Great and the question of his divinity 

Bringing officials to account in Classical Athens  

Athenian democracy and modern democracies  

Email Christos

Dr Nick Lowe

Making the New Hollywood Classics: Secrets, Lies, and Tales from Development Hell

The Rough Guide to Hades

Ancient Greece in Fiction

What Makes a Greek Tragedy

Write your Own Greek Tragedy

Stagecraft in Medea (or other plays by request)

Greek Tragedy: The Missing 98%

Tragedy and Cinema: Parallel Lives

Comedy from the Dionysia to the Apollo

The End of the Odyssey 

The Shapes of Epic

The Writing of Gladiator 

War Stories: The Iliad and the Plotting of Battle

The Rough Guide to Homer's Ithaca

Untold Homers: Retellings and Untellings Lost and Found

Staging the Epic: From Homer to Tragedy

Why the Greeks Didn't Invent the Bicycle

What happens in Pseudolus (or any other Roman comedy by request)

Greek Gods and Festivals

Other topics on Homer, tragedy, comedy by request

(Most of the above need a data projector, but some can manage without – contact Nick for details.)

Email Nick

 Dr Erica Rowan

Did they really eat dormice? An exploration of Roman diet

Eating and drinking in the ancient world

Introducing archaeobotany: Can we really learn anything from old seeds?

Introducing environmental archaeology: people, plants and animals

Life on the Bay of Naples

Health and nutrition in the Roman world

Farmers and scholars: How did the Romans feel about food? 

Email Erica

Professor Jari Pakkanen

Architectural Orders in Ancient Greece

Digital Documentation and Reconstruction of Greek Architecture in Three Dimensions

Email Jari


Professor Lene Rubinstein  

Voodoo, Curses and Love charms: magic in Athenian daily life

Direct democracy in the ancient Greek world

Education in the Hellenistic Greek cities

Death and funerary rituals in ancient Greece

Family life in classical Athens

Any topic related to Athenian law and law courts

Forgive and forget? The Athenian civil war of 404/3 and its aftermath

Mercenary soldiers and classical Greek warfare

Ancient Greek diplomacy: the role of ambassadors

Women in classical Athens (topic by arrangement)

Email Lene

Dr Efi Spentzou  

The new Achilles: redefining the epic hero in the Aeneid

The Roman Republican Self: fragility and assertion in Catullus

Passions, Art and Roman Sensitivities in Catullus

Love and Domination: gender struggles in Roman love elegy

Vengeful Gods and Suffering Mortals in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Discreet Subversion: female narrators in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Writing her story: the female voice in Latin poetry From Troy to Hollywood: the Story of the Hero Helen of Troy: a classical symbol in modern literature and art

Email Efi

General and miscellaneous

 

  • The employability skills gained from a classical degree (PowerPoint desirable) – Dr Richard Hawley
  • Why learn Ancient Languages? (PowerPoint desirable) – Dr Richard Hawley

Greek language and literature

  • The Shapes of Epic (data projector needed) - Dr. Nick Lowe
  • War Stories: The Iliad and the Plotting of Battle – Dr. Nick Lowe
  • Staging the Epic: From Homer to Tragedy - Dr. Nick Lowe
  • Epic, Memory, Mortality – Homer and the traditions of Epic – Prof. Ahuvia Kahane
  • The End of the Odyssey (data projector optional) - Dr. Nick Lowe
  • The Rough Guide to Homer’s Ithaca – Dr Nick Lowe
  • Untold Homers: adaptations and untellings lost and found - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Ancient Greek Lyric Poets, Eros, and Social Order – Prof. Ahuvia Kahane
  • What Makes a Greek Tragedy (data projector needed) – Dr Nick Lowe
  • Write your Own Greek Tragedy (data projector optional) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Stagecraft in Medea (or other Greek plays by request; data projector optional) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Greek Tragedy: The Missing 98% (data projector needed) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Greek Tragedy, especially women; also gods, chorus, stagecraft, etc. (PowerPoint desirable) - Dr Richard Hawley
  • Comedy from the Dionysia to the Apollo – Dr. Nick Lowe
  • Greek Comedy, especially women, audience, types of humour, etc. (PowerPoint desirable)- Dr Richard Hawley
  • Women in Greek literature (e.g. Homer, drama, satire) (PowerPoint desirable) - Dr Richard Hawley
  • Ancient biography and autobiography (PowerPoint desirable)- Dr Richard Hawley
  • Modern Critical Thinking and Ancient Literature – Prof. Ahuvia Kahane
  • Other topics on Homer, tragedy, comedy by request – Dr. Nick Lowe

Latin language and literature

Greek history, society, and culture

Roman history, society, and culture

Greek/Roman archaeology and material culture

  • Introducing archaeology: what does an archaeologist do? - Dr Zena Kamash
  • The archaeology of Roman Britain - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Using material culture in teaching: how can objects enhance understandings of the ancient world? - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Not just dormice: eating and drinking in the Roman world (linked to her public engagement project - find out more on the project's Twitter account @NotJustDormice , website or Facebook account) - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Health and hygiene in the Roman world (esp. toilets and bathing) - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Religion in Roman Britain - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Life and living conditions in Roman cities - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Roman Syria/Jordan - Dr Zena Kamash
  • Architectural Orders in Ancient Greece - Professor Jari Pakkanen 
  • Digital Documentation and Reconstruction of Greek Architecture in Three Dimensions - Professor Jari Pakkanen
  • Life on the Bay of Naples - Dr Erica Rowan 
  •  

  • Eating and Drinking in the Ancient World - Dr Erica Rowan  
  • Health and Nutrition in the Roman World - Dr Erica Rowan 
  • Introducing archaeobotany: can we really learn anything from old seeds? Dr Erica Rowan 
  • Introducing enviromental archaeology: people, plants and animals - Dr Erica Rowan

Ancient philosophy and religion

Reception of the classical world

  • Classics and Film – A Survey (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips) – Dr Liz Gloyn
  • Classics and Cinema – Prof. Ahuvia Kahane
  • Making the New Hollywood Classics: Secrets, Lies, and Tales from Development Hell (data projector optional) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • The Writing of Gladiator (data projector optional) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Tragedy and Cinema: Parallel Lives (data projector needed) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Ancient Greece in Fiction (data projector optional) - Dr Nick Lowe
  • Hollywood and Epic (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips) – Dr Liz Gloyn
  • How Do You Look At Medusa? Hollywood's Monster (requires Powerpoint & access to internet for video clips) – Dr Liz Gloyn
  • The modern reception of ancient women in films, novels and poetry (PowerPoint desirable)- Dr Richard Hawley
  • Ancient Texts and Modern Art - Prof. Ahuvia Kahane
  • Writing her story: the female voice in Latin poetry From Troy to Hollywood: the Story of the Hero Helen of Troy: a classical symbol in modern literature and art - Dr. Efi Spentzou

Click here to view our new Classics newsletter, Non Sequitur

 
 
 
 

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