Skip to main content

Publications

Publications

Our publications, papers and articles

Our world-class researchers are working on pioneering topics within the world of economics – here is a flavour of the recent output, some of which is highly rated for its wider societal impact.

2018

Published in 'Review of Economic Studies'

Dr Jesper Bagger’s research estimates an equilibrium on-the-job search model with endogenous search intensity. Workers differ by skill, firms by productivity. Workers respond to mismatch by intensive search, and sorting may result from complementarities in the match-level production function. The model is estimated on Danish matched employer-employee data.

Read the paper.

Published in 'Journal of Economic Theory'

Dr Michael Richter's research explores how aspirations for desired but  unavailable alternatives influence decisions, steering agents to choose similar available alternatives. His model links together disparate economic scenarios, helping to explain decisions such as: how the high price of luxury brands leads consumers to purchase similar and cheaper counterfeit products; “keeping up with the Joneses” or the mimicry of neighbors even though (or perhaps because) those alternatives are not feasible for them; how an employer may change her ranking of job applicants after interviewing a “superstar” who is clearly out of reach; how past consumption can create habits that influence current consumption, especially when past consumption levels are no longer attainable.

Read the paper.

2017

Published in 'Journal of Economic History'

Professor Andrew Seltzer's research examines the effects of the Victorian Factory and Shops Act, the first minimum wage law in Australia. 

Read the paper.

Published in 'Journal of Political Economy'

Professor Arnaud Chevalier’s research documents how children born during a period of high economic turmoil perform worse on various dimensions of education. He subsequently studies the possible mechanisms driving this phenomenon, focusing on family composition and certain parenting behavior that could lead to negative educational outcomes. The results confirm the large effect of parental selection. Further tests dismiss alternative explanations of the poorer educational attainment of the affected cohorts.

Read the paper.

Published in 'American Economic Review'

Professor Manolis Galenianos’s helps shed light on illicit drugs markets using data on purchases of crack cocaine. Sellers can rip off first-time buyers or can offer higher-quality drugs to induce buyers to purchase from them again. The estimated model implies that if drugs were legalized, in which case purity could be regulated and hence observable, the average purity of drugs would increase by approximately 20 percent. Moreover, increasing penalties may raise the purity and affordability of the drugs traded by increasing sellers' relative profitability of targeting loyal buyers versus first-time buyers.

Read the paper.

Published in 'International Economic Review'

Dr Ija Trapeznikova's research is concerned with developing a structural general equilibrium model that introduces labor adjustment on both intensive and extensive margins. The model includes a theory of a producer with multiple jobs, heterogeneous proÖtability and hiring that is impeded by search frictions.

Read the paper.

2016

Published in 'Journal of Econometrics'

Dr Jungyoon Lee’s research develops statistics to account for interdependence in economic data arising from externalities, spill-overs or the presence of common shocks. She develops an asymptotic theory for series estimation of nonparametric and semiparametric regression models for cross-sectional data under conditions on disturbances that allow for forms of cross-sectional dependence and heterogeneity. Because the estimation is nonparametric, it enables assumptions of a known parametric functional form, that are frequently not warranted by economic theory, to be dropped or relaxed. 

Read the paper.

Published in 'Journal of the European Economic Association'

Dr Melanie Luhrmann's research seeks to show that the decline in calories between 1980 and 2013 can be partially, but not entirely, rationalized with weight gain by a decline in the strenuousness of work and daily life. 

Read the paper.

Published in 'The Economic Journal'

Using a field experiment that assigned graders randomly to students’ examinations that did/did not contain names, Professor Daniel Hamermesh's research finds favouritism but no discrimination by nationality nor by gender. He was able to identify these preferences under a wide range of behavioural scenarios regarding the graders.

Read the paper.

Published in 'Economic Journal'

Does rising unemployment really increase domestic violence as many commentators expect? The contribution of Dr Dan Anderberg and Professor Jonathan Wadsworth's research is to examine how changes in unemployment affect the incidence of domestic abuse.

Read the paper.

2015

Published in 'Journal of Economic Theory'

Professor Michael Mandler's research consider agents who choose by proceeding through a checklist of criteria (for any pair of alternatives the first criterion that ranks the pair determines the agent's choice). Professor Mandler finds that, regardless of the discriminating capacity of the criteria in a checklist,choices that maximize complete and transitive preferences can always be the outcome of a 'quick' checklist that uses a small number of criteria. For any irrational preference on the other hand there is always a discriminatory capacity for criteria such that the preference is not the outcome of a quick checklist.

Read the paper.

Published in 'Economic Journal'

Dr Juan Pablo Rud examines the effect of polluting industries on agricultural productivity. The focus is on large-scale gold mining in Ghana that, similar to other fuel intensive activities, releases environmental pollutants with the potential to have cumulative negative effects on crops’ health and key agricultural inputs.

Read the paper.

Published in 'International Economic Review'

Dr Robert Sauer's publication estimates the economic and noneconomic returns to volunteering for prime-aged women. Dr Sauer finds that the economic returns to volunteering are more important than the noneconomic returns in increasing lifetime utility. The model he uses also reveals an adverse selection mechanism into volunteering that helps explain why reduced-form regressions of the returns to working for free will likely be downward biased.

Read the paper.

2014

Published in 'Econometrica'

Professor Francesco Feri's research studies behavior and equilibrium selection in network games. Professor Feri conducts a series of experiments (with 580 participants) in which actions are either strategic substitutes or strategic complements, and participants have either complete or incomplete information about the structure of a random network. Overall, the research sees  strong evidence that choices and the equilibrium played depend on one’s degree and the connectivity of the network, and suggestive evidence that choices also depend on the clustering in the network.

Read the paper.

Published in 'International Economic Review'

Although women in the United States now complete more college degrees than men, the distribution of college majors among college graduates remains unequal, with women about two-thirds as likely as men to major in business or science. Dr Ahu Gemici's research develops and estimates a dynamic, overlapping generations model of human capital investments and labor supply. Dr Gemici allows for specific college major choices, instead of aggregating these choices to the education level. Results show that changes in skill prices, higher schooling costs, and gender-specific changes in home value were each important to the long-term trends.

Read the paper.

Explore Royal Holloway

Get help paying for your studies at Royal Holloway through a range of scholarships and bursaries.

There are lots of exciting ways to get involved at Royal Holloway. Discover new interests and enjoy existing ones

Heading to university is exciting. Finding the right place to live will get you off to a good start

Whether you need support with your health or practical advice on budgeting or finding part-time work, we can help

Discover more about our 21 departments and schools

Find out why Royal Holloway is in the top 25% of UK universities for research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’

They say the two most important days of your life are the day you were born, and the day you find out why

Discover world-class research at Royal Holloway

Discover more about who we are today, and our vision for the future

Royal Holloway began as two pioneering colleges for the education of women in the 19th century, and their spirit lives on today

We’ve played a role in thousands of careers, some of them particularly remarkable

Find about our decision-making processes and the people who lead and manage Royal Holloway today