We use cookies on this site. By browsing our site you agree to our use of cookies. Close this message Find out more

Home > Philosophy home > Prospective students > Undergraduate degrees
More in this section Prospective students

Undergraduate degrees

Royal Holloway offers a wide away of undergraduate, postgraduate, and research degrees. In addition to the new Single Honours degree (starting in September 2014), Philosophy can form a minor component of degrees across the academic spectrum, including Mathematics, Physics, and film Studies, and forms 50% of the content of joint degrees offered with Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, Drama, English, Modern Languages, Music, and Politics and International Relations. We also offer a Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) degree with options to vary the weighting of each subject over the course of your degree.

Download our undergraduate brochure here

Our degrees are open to any students who have an interest in philosophical issues, whatever subjects they have previously studied, and are available on a part-time basis. Our first year courses are specially designed to introduce students to the main issues in philosophy, and courses in the second and third years provide opportunities to study ancient philosophy, modern and contemporary political thought, ethics, epistemology and scepticism, and major modern and contemporary Anglo-American and European thinkers,

No previous experience of Philosophy is necessary, just the desire to think rigorously and in detail about how we understand the world.

Standard offers vary from AAB (35 IB points) and 340 UCAS Tariff Points to ABB (34 IB points) and 320 UCAS Tariff Points, depending on the degree programme. For Politics, Philosophy and Economics the standard offer is AAB with at least a B in A-Level Maths, AAA with at least A in GCSE Maths or B in AS Maths, or an IB score of 35 with at least 5 in SL Maths.

For further information on undergraduate philosophy degrees please contact the Undergraduate Programme Director, Dr Henry Somers-Hall

Year 1

  • Introduction to Ancient Philosophy (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Modern Philosophy  (½ unit)
  • Epistemology and Metaphysics (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Aesthetics and Morals (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Political Philosophy (½ unit)
  • Mind and Consciousness (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Logic (½ unit)
  • Tutorial Special Study (½ unit)

Year 2

Students must take:

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 1: From Kant to Hegel (½ unit)
  • Mind and World (½ unit)

and choose options equal to the value of three units (with no more than one unit of political philosophy) from the following:

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 2: The Critique of Idealism (½ unit)
  • Philosophy and the Arts (½ unit)
  • Practical Ethics (½ unit)
  • Scepticism (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Psychology (1 unit)
  • Modern French Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Religion (1 unit)
  • Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy (1 unit)
  • The Good Life (1 unit)
  • Modern Political Thought (1 unit)
  • Contemporary Political Theory (1 unit)

Year 3

Students will take a one unit dissertation course, plus three units (no more than one unit of political philosophy) from the following:

  • Modern European Philosophy 1: From Husserl to Heidegger (½ unit)
  • Modern European Philosophy 2: Poststructuralism and its Critics (½ unit)
  • Recovering Reality (½ unit)
  • Philosophy and the Arts (½ unit)
  • Practical Ethics (½ unit)
  • Scepticism (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Psychology (1 unit)
  • Modern French Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Religion (1 unit)
  • Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy (1 unit)
  • The Good Life (1 unit)
  • Literature and Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Key Thinkers (1 unit)
  • Radical Political Theory (1 unit)
  • The Politics of Toleration (½ unit)
  • Social Justice: From Theory to Practice (½ unit)
  • Issues in Democratic Theory (1 unit)

(Note: some units above are offered on alternating years and so will only be available to students in their second or their third year, but not both)

Joint degree programmes whose content is 50% in philosophy and 50% in another area are available with twelve different subjects. The content and specific requirements of the non-philosophy component differ from degree to degree in accordance with the partnering academic department. The Philosophy component of the degree consists in compulsory first year foundation courses, with increasing flexibility of choice in the second and third years. Students must write a final year dissertation based on independent research in either philosophy or in the partnering subject area. The philosophy programme consists of:

Year 1

  • Introduction to Ancient Philosophy (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Modern Philosophy (½ unit)
  • Epistemology and Metaphysics (½ unit)

And then one of the following:

  • Introduction to Aesthetics and Morals (½ unit)
  • Mind and Consciousness (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Logic (½ unit)

Year 2

Students must take:

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 1: From Kant to Hegel (½ unit)
  • Mind and World (½ unit)

and choose options equal to the value of one unit from the following:

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 2: The Critique of Idealism (½ unit)
  • Philosophy and the Arts (½ unit)
  • Practical Ethics (½ unit)
  • Scepticism (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Psychology (1 unit)
  • Modern French Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Religion (1 unit)
  • Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy (1 unit)
  • The Good Life (1 unit)
  • Modern Political Thought (1 unit)
  • Contemporary Political Theory (1 unit)

Year 3

Students will take a one unit dissertation course in either philosophy or their partnering subject, plus additional courses such that their final year is composed of two units of philosophy.

  • Modern European Philosophy 1: From Husserl to Heidegger (½ unit)
  • Modern European Philosophy 2: Poststructuralism and its Critics (½ unit)
  • Recovering Reality (½ unit)
  • Philosophy and the Arts (½ unit)
  • Practical Ethics (½ unit)
  • Scepticism (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Psychology (1 unit)
  • Modern French Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Religion (1 unit)
  • Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy (1 unit)
  • The Good Life (1 unit)
  • Literature and Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Key Thinkers (1 unit)
  • Radical Political Theory (1 unit)
  • The Politics of Toleration (½ unit)
  • Social Justice: From Theory to Practice (½ unit)
  • Issues in Democratic Theory (1 unit)
(Note: some units above are offered on alternating years and so will only be available to students in their second or their third year, but not both. Also, there are some restrictions on the third year courses listed above if students choose not to write their dissertation in philosophy. In cases where these courses are being contributed to the philosophy programme by the partnering department, they cannot be taken as part of the philosophy component of the degree).

This exciting degree provides students with the opportunity to study three disciplines that are crucial for an understanding of the complex dynamics of today’s world. Students will study a common foundation in the first year, and an advanced seminar and dissertation unit in their final year that develops links across the three disciplines – a distinctive feature of the course. Students have great flexibility to vary their degrees in the second and third years in such a way as to graduate with one of three awards: BSc Politics, Philosophy and Economics; BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics; and BA Politics and Philosophy with Economics.

Year 1

  • Principles of Economics (1 unit)
  • Quantiative Methods of Economics (1 unit)
  • Introduction to Politics and Government (1 unit)
  • Epistemology and Metaphysics (½ unit)

And then one of the following:

  • Introduction to Aesthetics and Morals (½ unit)
  • Mind and Consciousness (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Logic (½ unit)

Year 2

Students must choose at least one unit, and no more than two, from available options in each of the three subject areas, for a total of four units for the year. In Philosophy they must take:

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 1: From Kant to Hegel (½ unit)
  • Mind and World (½ unit)

and in Economics their course choices are limited to:

  • Microeconomics (1 unit)
  • Macroeconomics (1 unit)

Year 3

Advanced Seminar and Dissertation in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (one unit)

Students then choose three units of available courses in at least two of the subject areas. In Economics, they must have taken both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics in their second year to be able to choose third year Economics courses. If they have taken only one of those courses in Year 2, they may only choose the other in Year 3.

(Note: some units above are offered on alternating years and so will only be available to students in their second or their third year, but not both)

The minor degree programmes in philosophy consist of 25% philosophy and 75% of the partnering subject. These combinations are available with twelve different subjects, including Film Studies, Mathematics and Physics.

Year 1

  • Epistemology and Metaphysics (½ unit)

And then one of the following:

  • Introduction to Aesthetics and Morals (½ unit)
  • Mind and Consciousness (½ unit)
  • Introduction to Logic (½ unit)

Year 2

  • Introduction to European Philosophy 1: From Kant to Hegel (½ unit)
  • Mind and World (½ unit)

Year 3

Students must take one unit from the following courses (note: some courses only available on alternate years):

  • Modern European Philosophy 1: From Husserl to Heidegger (½ unit)
  • Modern European Philosophy 2: Poststructuralism and its Critics (½ unit)
  • Recovering Reality (½ unit)
  • Philosophy and the Arts (½ unit)
  • Practical Ethics (½ unit)
  • Scepticism (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Psychology (1 unit)
  • Modern French Philosophy (1 unit)
  • Philosophy of Religion (1 unit)
  • Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy (1 unit)
  • The Good Life (1 unit)

 

 
 
 
 

Comment on this page

Did you find the information you were looking for? Is there a broken link or content that needs updating? Let us know so we can improve the page.

Note: If you need further information or have a question that cannot be satisfied by this page, please call our switchboard on +44 (0)1784 434455.

This window will close when you submit your comment.

Add Your Feedback
Close