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Find out more about who you may be taught by while studying for a Modern Languages degree at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Daniela Cerimonia

Daniela Cerimonia

Daniela lectures in Italian, Comparative Literature and the Visual Arts. She teaches modules including 19th and 20th-century Italian literature such as Italian crime fiction, the postmodern in Italian literature, art and culture in Renaissance Florence, Aestheticism and Futurism, and modern Italian cultural history. She also teaches a final-year course on Italian Fashion and Design. Check out the dedicated website where students can share their research.

Alba Chaparro

Alba Chaporro

Alba is the Spanish Language Coordinator. She teaches Spanish at all levels, specialising in grammar, lexicography and general linguistics as well as translation. She also teaches a second year English to Spanish translation course for native and near native speakers of Spanish focusing on journalistic as well as literary translation. Her final year course, Advanced Literary Translation, takes on a critical and diachronic perspective.

Ruth Cruickshank

Ruth Cruikshank

Ruth lectures in Comparative Literature and Culture and French. She specialises in identifying and comparing how literature, film and visual arts reflect the contexts in which they are produced. She is fascinated by the effects of consumer culture and globalisation, and this informs many different courses, including Histories of Representation and her final-year option, Image, Identity and Consumer Culture: Post-War French Fiction and Film. As well as researching food culture, Ruth is a specialist in translation, and teaches final-year Advanced Translating Skills. You can read more about her and her research and publications here.

Colin Davis

CD

Colin teaches French and Comparative Literature. He is particularly interested in the ways in which literature and film can be understood from philosophical perspectives. His final-year course Ethics and Violence: Murder, Suicide, and Genocide in Literature and Film looks at how literature and films deal with the theme of killing. You can find out more about his interests and research here.

Fabrizio De Donno

Fabrizio De Donna

Fabrizio lectures in Italian and Comparative Culture, as well as in Liberal Arts. He specialises in the relationship between politics and culture, with a focus on political violence. His second year Liberal Arts course, Power and Dissent, looks at a variety of political contexts, from Italy and India to Africa and China, and different media, from political tract to literature and music. Similarly, his final year course in Italian: Shooting History: Dictatorship, Terror and Crime in Italian film, deals with movies about fascism, communist terrorism and organised crime. His final year course in Comparative Literature and Culture, Transnationalism, Diaspora and Globalisation in Contemporary Film, explores cinematic representations of the current migration crisis, global terrorism and postcolonial globalisation.

Miguel Garcia

Miguel Garcia

Miguel is a PhD student in Hispanic Studies and conducts Spanish language and translation classes. His teaching focuses on Spanish oral practice and conversation as part of the core language modules for students of all years. Involving a varied range of topics from Hispanic literature, cinema, the visual arts and current and historical socio-political issues in Spanish-speaking countries, students can improve their spoken language level while developing their communicative and analytical skills. He also teaches on the first-year course Introduction to Translation, which looks at literary and quality journalistic texts from multiple sources offering a variety of translation techniques. Miguel is also a writer of poetry in both Spanish and English.

Miriam Haddu

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Miriam lectures in Hispanic Studies, with a focus on Latin America. Her specialist area is Mexican Visual Culture, on which she teaches a second year course called Mexican Visual Arts and Film. This course introduces students to the work of photographers, muralists and filmmakers from Mexico. Her final year course Contemporary Mexican Cinema looks at a variety of films that reflect some of the main social concerns and changes affecting current Mexican society, from effects of violence and neoliberalism, to the recent Drug Wars and the challenges of high school bullying. Miriam publishes and has given public lectures on the topic of Mexican photography and film. You can find out more on her Pure profile.

Joe Harris

Joe Harris

Joe specialises in early-modern French literature, especially seventeenth- and eighteenth-century drama. His research interests include gender and sexuality, comedy and laughter, psychology, audience response, death, and misanthropy. He is the author of Inventing the Spectator: Subjectivity and the Theatrical Experience in Early Modern France (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Hidden Agendas: Cross-Dressing in Seventeenth-Century France (Gunther Narr, 2005), and editor of Identification Before Freud: French Perspectives (2008), and he wrote the introduction to Four French Plays (Penguin Classics, 2013). He is currently co-editing a volume on fame and posterity in early modern France, editing an edition of two eighteenth-century sequels to Molière's comedy Le Misanthrope, and writing a monograph on death and murder in Corneille.  You can find out more about his interests and research here.

Jon Hughes

Jon Hughes

Jon specialises in early 20th-century literature and culture, especially film, journalism and visual arts of the 1920s and 1930s. Jon's first-year teaching includes a number of Comparative Literature courses covering iconic films such as MetropolisThe Blue AngelCitizen Kane and Psycho. His second-year course Childhood and Youth in Modern German Culture covers drama, novels and films from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Almost all of Jon's teaching is comparative and interdisciplinary in nature. He also researches the history and cultural representation of sport, and his forthcoming book looks at the representation of the boxer Max Schmeling as a national hero through nearly a 100 years of turbulent German history. Read more about his research and publications here.

Ruth Hemus

Ruth Hemus

Ruth has a background in French and German and enjoys teaching across geographical boundaries and disciplines. Her final year course Wanton Women: Artists and Writers of the French avant-garde encourages research into women artists and writers who participated in Dada and Surrealism. For the Comparative Literature and Culture programme she co-devised the second-year course Gender and Clothing in 20th Century Literature and Culture, taking in novels, films and artworks. For Cultural Encounters, the core first-year course for Liberal Arts, she takes students into the Picture Gallery to work on their group project. Read more about her publications and projects here.

Agathe Henssien

Agathe Henssie

Agathe is a French lectrice, who teaches French language seminars. She has worked as a language teacher in different cultural backgrounds and she has also worked on a translation into French of an Italian work on the philosophy of art. With Lisa Letourneau she co-organises the famous Royal Holloway French Film Club.

Maura Iannelli-Chanda

Maura

Maura has been enjoying teaching Italian for the past 30 years at Royal Holloway. She teaches all levels from the beginners’ course to the finalists’ translation class. Maura prefers a “hands-on” teaching style and has been involved in running various extracurricular activities such as the Italian Film Club. Her love of theatre has inspired her to co-direct the play L’uomo, la bestia e la virtù, and to direct and produce her adaptation of the play Così è se vi pare. Both plays are by the Sicilian playwright, Luigi Pirandello and were acted by her students.

James Kent

James Kent

James lectures in Hispanic Studies and the majority of his courses involve the study of film and visual cultures. He specialises in Cuban photography and is also a practising photographer. His second-year course Rebels, Revolution and Representation in Latin America looks at the work of photographers such as Henri Cartier Bresson and Nacho López. On his final-year course Horror Cinema in the Hispanic World students explore Spanish-language horror films made since the 1970s in relation to key works from the history of global horror filmmaking. Follow him on Instagram @jckfoto and read more about his research and publications here.

Emily Jeremiah

Emily Jeremiah

Emily lectures in German and Comparative Literature. She primarily teaches courses on German literature and culture, such as Introduction to German Studies and Death, Desire, Decline. Her final-year course Narrative and Identity looks at the German novel since Goethe as well as important theories of identity. Emily also teaches translation and is herself a prize-winning translator of Finnish fiction and poetry, as well as a longstanding judge of the Schlegel-Tieck Prize. She is fascinated by gender and teaches on Gender and Clothing, a course she helped set up. Find out more about her research and publications here.

Stefano Jossa

Stefano Jossa

Stefano teaches Italian literature and culture. Being a passionate reader and scholar of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ariosto and Tasso, he specialises in early modern Italian narratives. His courses are essentially meant to introduce British and international students to reading and understanding Italian classics, including their legacy in the English speaking culture. Stefano is also interested in the construction of Italian national identity, which he teaches in his first-year course Building the Italian Nation: Heroes and Anti-heroes from Pinocchio to The Leopard. You can read about his research here.

Abigail Lee Six

Abigail Lee Six

Abigail lectures in Spanish and Comparative Literature. As well as teaching Spanish to English literary translation, she specialises in Peninsular Spanish prose fiction from the 19th century to the present day. Her final-year courses, on short fiction by Spanish women writers and Gothic Literature in Spanish and English, reflect her research interests in gender and the Spanish Gothic. Discover more about her research.

Arantza Mayo

Arantza Mayo

Arantza enjoys teaching Early Modern Hispanic Literature and Visual Arts as well as 20th-century Latin American Literature. Some of her courses, such as Comparative Hispanic Culture and Spanish American Literature: An Overview (taught in Spanish), give you the opportunity to study diverse materials ―from poetry to painting via music and chronicles― across periods while others focus on more specific areas. Devotion, Deceit, Desire considers the tensions between truth and fiction in prose and drama while From Public Display to Private Devotion examines the role of religion in shaping early modern writing and visual arts. You can read about her research here.

Anja Peters

Anja Petes

Anja lectures in German language and literature with a particular emphasis on 19th-century literature and culture. She is currently teaching courses on Theodor Fontane and German literature in the Gothic tradition as well as German core language units. She is also the German Year Abroad Tutor supporting students before and during their Year Abroad. In her teaching she places particular emphasis on student participation and the creation of a supportive, stimulating and enjoyable learning environment that enables students to actively engage with the teaching material and to become independent and successful learners.

Giuliana Pieri

Giuliana Pieri

Giuliana lectures in Italian, Comparative Literature, and the History of Art and Visual Culture. She specialises in both Renaissance art and 19th and 20th-century visual culture in Italy and Europe. Her courses include art and culture in Renaissance Italy, the Italian Fascist movement, and Italian 20th- and 21st-century literature, especially crime fiction. Her final year course Italian Fashion and Design focuses on Italian culture and society in the period 1945-1992 through the analysis of a number of key Italian architect-designers and fashion designers including Gio Ponti, Ettore Sottsass, Emilio Pucci, Giorgio Armani and Dolce & Gabbana. You can read about her research here.

Abigail Richards

Abigail Richards

Abigail is a PhD French student in her second year. She has a great interest in French language and culture and teaches French Pratique classes to second year undergraduate students. Read more about her research here.

Eric Robertson

Eric Robertson

Eric lectures in French and Comparative Literature. Besides teaching French language and French-English translation, he specialises in courses on modern French literature and its relationship with the visual arts (primarily painting, collage, drawing and sculpture, but also film). His final-year course Text and Image in France: from Cubism to the Present examines the work of influential writers and artists from the past century whose ground-breaking interactions have brought an array of creative forms into dialogue. You can read more about his research and publications here.

Avril Tynan

Avril Tynan

Avril is a French language tutor and lectures in contemporary French literature. Her background is in French literature and Holocaust Studies, and she was recently awarded her PhD on Franco-Spanish author Jorge Semprun. She is the tutor on the new Intensive French for Beginners programme and also teaches the French Languages for All evening classes. She teaches a module on Nobel Prize Winner Patrick Modiano’s Dora Bruder as part of the first-year course The Individual and Society. Read more about her research and publications here.

Danielle Sands

Danielle Sands

Danielle lectures in Comparative Literature and Liberal Arts. She is interested in the relationship between literary texts and philosophical questions. One question which continues to puzzle her is ‘what does it mean to be human?’ She looks to address this, by way of elephants, chimpanzees and microbes, in her final-year course Humans and Other Animals in Twenty-First Century Fiction and Thought. Follow her on Twitter @DanielleCSands and read more about her research and publications here.

Hannah Thompson

Hannah Thompson

Hannah lectures in French and Comparative Literature and Culture. As well as teaching written French and literary translation, she specialises in the French novel. Her final-year course Blindness and Vision in French Culture also looks at film and photography from a Disability Studies perspective and is complemented by her popular Blind Spot blog. Hannah’s favourite novel is Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, which she teaches as part of Writing Romance and Desire. Follow her on twitter @BlindSpotHannah and read more about her research and publications here.

Sarah Wright

wright2

Sarah lectures in Spanish cinema, theatre and comparative literature. She delivers regular workshops for schools at the BFI on Almodóvar and on Spanish cinema. Her final year course Seducing the Nation: Spanish Film 1940s to 1980s focuses on film under Francoism, while in her second year course Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spanish Cinema students explore recent trends in Spanish film. She is currently leading a network of scholars on Childhood and Nation in World Cinemas and has recently worked on a literal translation of Blood Wedding with playwright David Ireland and award-winning disabilities theatre company Graeae. Read more about her research and publications here.

James Williams

james Williams

James lectures in French and Comparative Literature. He specialises in French and European cinema and draws on his own filmmaking experience to teach about aspects of film style such as montage. In the final-year course Transnationalism, Diaspora and Globalisation in Contemporary Film he looks at the work of key African Francophone directors like Ousmane Sembene and Abderrahmane Sissako. One of James’s favourite films is Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974) by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, which he teaches on the second-year course International Film II about readings and representations of world cinema. Read more about his research and publications here.

Anne-Pauline Crepet

Anne-Pauline Crepet

Anne-Pauline is a French language tutor. She teaches French at all levels, as well as translation for first and second years. Over the past few years, she has worked as a language tutor at Durham University and University of London Institute in Paris. She has a keen interest in history, particularly in seventeenth-century gender and diplomacy, topics she researched for her PhD.

 

 
 
 

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