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Advanced Shakespeare: The Problem Plays (EN3011)

Summer Reading List 2016-17

Course tutor: Dr Harry Newman 

Editions

  • Troilus and Cressida, ed. David Bevington, Arden Shakespeare, third series (Walton-on-Thames: Thomas Nelson, 1998).
  • All’s Well That Ends Well, ed. Susan Snyder, Oxford World’s Classics (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).
  • Measure for Measure, ed. Brian Gibbons, New Cambridge Shakespeare, second edition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).

Videos/DVDs

  • Troilus and Cressida, dir. Jonathan Miller (GB, 1992), BBC Educational.
  • All’s Well That Ends Well, dir. Elijah Moshinsky (GB, 1981), BBC Enterprises.
  • Measure for Measure, dir. Desmond Davis (GB, 1990), BBC Enterprises.
  • Measure for Measure, dir. David Thacker (GB, 1994), BBC 2 broadcast.
  • Measure for Measure, BBC 4 live broadcast from the Globe, 2004.

Note: Copies ofthese videos/DVDs can be borrowed from Founder’s Library and also from the English Department Office.

Audio-recordings

  • The Complete Arkangel Shakespeare: 38 Fully Dramatized Unabridged Plays on CD (Auburn, Calif.: Arkangel, 2003). Available in the Department Office and in Founders Library.

Troilus and Cressida

  • Adams, Howard C., ‘What Cressid Is’, in Sexuality and Politics in Renaissance Drama, ed. Carole Levin and Karen Robertson (Lewiston, NY: Mellen, 1991), pp. 75-93.
  • Adamson, Jane, Troilus and Cressida (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1987).
  • Adelman, Janet, ‘“This is and is not Cressid”: The Characterization of Cressida’, in The (M)other Tongue: Essays in Feminist Psychoanalytic Interpretation, ed. Shirley Nelson Garner, Claire Kehane and Madelon Sprengnether (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1985), pp. 119-41.
  • Adelman, Janet, Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare’s Plays, Hamlet to The Tempest (New York and London: Routledge, 1992), Ch. 3: ‘“Is Thy Union Here?”: Union and Its Discontents in Troilus and Cressida and Othello’, pp. 38-63. Link to e-book copy on Moodle.
  • Barfoot, C.C., ‘Troilus and Cressida: “Praise us as we are tasted”, Shakespeare Quarterly, 39 (1988), 45-57. Copy on Moodle.
  • Bayley, John, ‘Time and the Trojans’, Essays in Criticism, 25 (1975), pp. 55-73; reprinted in Priscilla Martin (ed.), Troilus and Cressida: A Casebook (London: Macmillan, 1976). Copy on Moodle.
  • Bayley, John, Shakespeare and Tragedy (London: Routledge, 1981), Ch. 4: ‘Longing and Homesickness: Troilus and Cressida’, pp. 96-117.
  • Beale, Simon Russell, ‘Thersites in Troilus and Cressida’, in Players of Shakespeare 3, ed. Russell Jackson and Robert Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 160-73.
  • Bloom, Harold, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (London: Fourth Estate, 1999), pp. 327-44. Copy on Moodle.
  • Bowen, Barbara E., Gender in the Theatre of War: Shakespeare’s ‘Troilus and Cressida’ (New York: Garland, 1993).
  • Bradshaw, Graham, Shakespeare’s Scepticism (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1987), Ch. 4: ‘The Genealogy of Ideals: Troylus and Cressida’.
  • Bruster, Douglas, ‘“The Alteration of Men”: Troilus and Cressida, Troynovant, and Trade’, in Drama and the Market in the Age of Shakespeare (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 97-117.
  • Charnes, Linda, ‘“So unsecret to ourselves”: Notorious Identity and the Material Subject in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida”, Shakespeare Quarterly, 40 (1989), pp. 413-40: copy on Moodle; reprinted in Charnes, Notorious Identity: Materializing the Subject in Shakespeare (Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 1993), Ch. 2, pp. 70-102.
  • Charnes, Linda, ‘The Two-Party System in Troilus and Cressida’, in A Companion to Shakespeare, Volume 1V: The Poems, Problem Comedies, Late Plays, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean Howard (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003).
  • Colie, Rosalie, ‘Forms and their Meaning: “Monumental Mockery”’, in her Shakespeare’s Living Art (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974).
  • Dusinberre, Juliet, ‘Troilus and Cressida and the Definition of Beauty’, Shakespeare Survey, 36 (1983), pp. 85-95. Copy on Moodle.
  • Engle, Lars, Shakespeare and Pragmatism: Market of his Time (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993), Ch. 2, pp. 147-63.
  • Everett, Barbara, ‘The Inaction of Troilus and Cressida’, Essays in Criticism, 32 (1982), pp. 119-39. Copy on Moodle.
  • Freund, Elizabeth, ‘“Ariachne’s Broken Woof”: The Rhetoric of Citation in Troilus and Cressida’, in Shakespeare and the Question of Theory, ed. Patricia Parker and Geoffrey Hartman (New York and London: Methuen, 1985), pp. 19-36. Copy on Moodle.
  • Girard, René, ‘The Politics of Desire in Troilus and Cressida’, in Shakespeare and the Question of Theory, ed. Patricia Parker and Geoffrey Hartman  (New York and London: Methuen, 1985), pp. 188-209. Link to e-book copy on Moodle.
  • Grady, Hugh, Shakespeare’s Universal Wolf: Postmodernist Studies in Early Modern Reification (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), Ch. 2: ‘“Mad Idolatry”: Commodification and Reification in Troilus and Cressida’, pp. 58-94.
  • Greene, Gayle, ‘Shakespeare’s Cressida: “a kind of self”’, in The Woman’s Part, ed. C. Lenz, R. Swift, G.
  • Greene and C. Neely (Urbana, Chicago and London: University of Illinois Press, 1980), pp. 133-49.
  • Greene, Gayle, ‘Language and Value in Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 21 (1981), 271-85. Copy on Moodle.
  • Greenfield, Matthew, ‘Fragments of Nationalism in Troilus and Cressida’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 199-222.
  • Hillman, David, ‘The Gastric Epic: Troilus and Cressida’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 48 (1997), pp. 295-313. Copy on Moodle.
  • Hodgdon, Barbara, ‘He Do Cressida in Different Voices’, English Literary Renaissance, 20 (1990), pp. 254-86.
  • James, Heather, ‘“Tricks We Play on the Dead”: Making History in Troilus and Cressida’, in her Shakespeare’s Troy: Drama, Politics and the Translation of Empire (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), pp. 85-118; also in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 159-76.
  • Jensen, Phebe, ‘The Textual Politics of Troilus and Cressida’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 46 (1995), pp. 414-23. Copy on Moodle.
  • Kermode, Frank, ‘“Opinion” in Troilus and Cressida’, in Critical Quarterly, 54:1 (April 2012), 88-102. Copy on Moodle.
  • Kermode, Frank, Shakespeare’s Language (London: Allen Lane, 2000), pp. 126-41.
  • Kopper, John, ‘Troilus at Pluto’s Gates: Subjectivity and the Duplicity of Discourse in Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida’, in Shakespeare and Deconstruction, ed. G. Douglas Atkins and David M.
  • Bergeron (New York, Bern, Frankfurt and Paris: Peter Lang, 1988).
  • Kott, Jan, ‘Troilus and Cressida: Amazing and Modern’, in his Shakespeare Our Contemporary (London: Methuen, 1965), pp. 61-7.
  • Levine, Laura, ‘Troilus and Cressida and the Politics of Rage’, in her Men in Women’s  Clothing: Anti-theatricality and Effeminization, 1579-1642 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp.26-43.
  • Long, Michael, The Unnatural Scene: A Study in Shakespearean Tragedy (London: Methuen, 1976), Ch. 5: ‘The Comedy of Troilus and Cressida’, pp. 102-22.
  • Mallin, Eric S., ‘Emulous Factions and the Collapse of Chivalry’, Representations, 29 (1990), pp. 145-79; reprinted in Mallin, Inscribing the Time: Shakespeare and the End of Elizabethan England (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995), pp. 25-61. Copy on Moodle.
  • Martin, Priscilla (ed.), Troilus and Cressida: A Casebook (London: Macmillan, 1976).
  • Mead, Stephen X., ‘“Thou Art Chang’d”: Public Value and Personal Identity in Troilus and Cressida’, Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 22 (1992), pp. 237-59. Copy on Moodle.
  • McAlindon, T., ‘Language, Style and Meaning in Troilus and Cressida’, PMLA, 84 (1969), pp. 29-43; extract in Priscilla Martin (ed.), Troilus and Cressida: A Casebook (London: Macmillan, 1976).
  • Norbrook, David, ‘Rhetoric, Ideology and the Elizabethan World Picture’, in Renaissance Rhetoric, ed. Peter Mack (London: Macmillan, 1994), pp. 140-64.
  • Novy, Marianne L., Love’s Argument: Gender Relations in Shakespeare (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1984), pp. 99-124.
  • Nowottny, Winifred, ‘“Opinion” and “Value” in Troilus and Cressida’, Essays in Criticism, 4 (1954), pp. 282-96. Copy on Moodle.
  • O’Rourke, James, ‘“Rule in Unity” and Otherwise: Love and Sex in Troilus and Cressida’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 43 (1992), pp. 139-58. Copy on Moodle.
  • Parker, Patricia, Shakespeare from the Margins (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996), Ch. 6: ‘Dilation and Inflation: All’s Well That Ends Well, Troilus and Cressida, and Shakespearean Increase’, pp. 185-228.
  • Rossiter, A.P., Angel with Horns and Other Shakespeare Lectures (London: Longman, 1961), Ch. 7; extract in Priscilla Martin (ed.), Troilus and Cressida: A Casebook (London : Macmillan, 1976).
  • Ryan, Kiernan, ‘Troilus and Cressida: The Perils of Presentism’, in Presentist Shakespeares, ed. Terence Hawkes and Hugh Grady (New York and London: Routledge, 2006), pp. 164-83. Link to e-book copy on Moodle.
  • Scott, William O., ‘Self-Difference in Troilus and Cressida’, in Shakespeare and Deconstruction, ed. G.Douglas Atkins and David M. Bergeron (New York, Bern, Frankfurt and Paris: Peter Lang, 1988).
  • Shirley, Frances A. (ed.), Troilus and Cressida, Shakespeare in Production (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).
  • Spear, Gary, ‘Shakespeare’s “Manly” Parts: Masculinity and Effeminacy in Troilus and Cressida’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 44 (1993), pp. 409-22. Copy on Moodle.
  • Thomson, Patricia, ‘Rant and Cant in Troilus and Cressida’, Essays and Studies, 22 (1969), pp. 33-56.
  • Tiffany, Grace, ‘Not saying No: Female Self-Erasure in Troilus and Cressida’, Texas Studies in English Literature and Language, 35 (1993), 44-56. Copy on Moodle.
  • Traub, Valerie, ‘Invading Bodies/Bawdy Exchanges: Disease, Desire and Representation’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 177-98.
  • Tylee, Claire M., ‘The Text of Cressida and Every Ticklish Reader: Troilus and Cressida, the Greek Camp Scene’, Shakespeare Survey, 41 (1989), pp. 63-76. Copy on Moodle.
  • Wilson, Robert Rawdon and Edward Milowicki, ‘Troilus and Cressida: Voices in the Darkness of Troy’, in
  • Jonathan Hart (ed.), Reading the Renaissance: Culture, Poetics, and Drama (New York: Garland, 1996), pp. 129-44.

All’s Well That Ends Well                 

  • Adelman, Janet, Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare’s Plays, Hamlet to The Tempest (New York and London: Routledge, 1992), Ch. 4: ‘Marriage and the Maternal Body: On Marriage as the End of Comedy in All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure’. Copy on Moodle.
  • Asp, Caroline, ‘Subjectivity, Desire and Female Friendship in All’s Well That Ends Well’, in Shakespeare’s Comedies, ed. Gary Waller (London and New York: Longman, 1991), pp. 175-92; also in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 74-94.
  • Berkeley, David S. and Donald Keesee, ‘Bertram’s Blood-Consciousness in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 31 (1991), 247-58. Copy on Moodle.
  • Bloom, Harold, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (London: Fourth Estate, 1999), pp. 345-57.
  • Briggs, Julia, ‘Shakespeare’s Bed-Tricks’, Essays in Criticism, 44 (1994), pp. 293-314. Copy on Moodle.
  • Brooke, Nicholas, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Survey, 30 (1977), pp. 73-84. Copy on Moodle.
  • Crider, Scott F., ‘Our Boundary Stones: “Torture” in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Ben Jonson Journal, 2(1995), pp. 73-100.
  • Donaldson, Ian, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well: Shakespeare’s Play of Endings’, Essays in Criticism, 27 (1977), pp. 34-55. Copy on Moodle.
  • Ellis, David, ‘Finding a Part for Parolles’, Essays in Criticism, 39 (1989), pp. 289-304. Copy on Moodle.
  • Erickson, Peter, ‘The Political Effects of Gender and Class in All’s Well That Ends Well’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 54-73.
  • Everett, Barbara, All’s Well That Ends Well, New Penguin Shakespeare (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1970), ‘Introduction’, pp. 7-42.
  • Free, Mary, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well as Non-comic Comedy’, in Frances Teague (ed.), Acting Funny: Comic Theory and Practice in Shakespeare’s Plays (London: Associated University Presses, 1994), pp. 40-51.
  • Friedman, Michael D., ‘“Service Is No Heritage”: Bertram and the Ideology of Procreation’, Studies in Philology, 92 (1995), pp. 80-101. Copy on Moodle.
  • Friedman, Michael D., ‘Male Bonds and Marriage in All’s Well and Much Ado’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 35 (1995), pp. 231-49. Copy on Moodle.
  • Gross, Gerard J.,‘The Conclusion to All’s Well That Ends Well’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 23 (1983), 257-76. Copy on Moodle.
  • Hall, Jonathan, Anxious Pleasures: Shakespearean Comedy and the Nation-State (Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 1995), Ch. 8: ‘“Adoption Strives with Nature”: The Slip of Patriarchal Signifiers in All’s Well That Ends Well’, pp. 127-50.
  • Hapgood, Robert, ‘The Life of Shame: Parolles and All’s Well’, Essays in Criticism, 15 (1965), pp. 269-78.Copy on Moodle.
  • Hodgdon, Barbara, ‘The Making of Virgins and Mothers: Sexual Signs, Substitute Scenes, and Doubled Presences in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Philological Quarterly, 66 (1987), pp. 47-71. Copy on Moodle.
  • Kastan, David Scott, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well and the Limits of Comedy’, English Literary History, 52 (1985), pp. 575-89. Copy on Moodle.
  • Leggatt, Alexander, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well: The Testing of Romance’, Modern Language Quarterly, 32 (1971), pp. 21-41.
  • McCandless, David, ‘Helena’s Bed-Trick: Gender and Performance in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 45 (1994), pp. 449-68. Copy on Moodle.
  • Nevo, Ruth, ‘Motive and Meaning in All’s Well That Ends Well’, in John Mahon and Thomas A. Pendelton (eds), Fanned and Winnowed Opinions (London and New York: Methuen, 1987) , pp. 26-51.
  • Parker, Patricia, Shakespeare from the Margins (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996), Ch. 6: ‘Dilation and Inflation: All’s Well That Ends Well, Troilus and Cressida, and Shakespearean Increase’, pp. 185-228.
  • Parker, R. B., ‘War and Sex in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Survey, 37 (1984), pp. 99-113. Copy on Moodle.
  • Price, Joseph G., The Unfortunate Comedy: A Study of ‘All’s Well That Ends Well’ and its Critics (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1968).
  • Rawnsley, Ciara, ‘Behind the Happily-Ever-After: Shakespeare’s Use of Fairy Tales and All’s Well That Ends Well’, Journal of Early Modern Studies, 2 (2013), 141-58.Copy on Moodle.
  • Rossiter, A.P., Angel with Horns and Other Shakespeare Lectures (London: Longman, 1961), Ch. 5.
  • Ryan, Kiernan, ‘“Where Hope is Coldest”: All’s Well That Ends Well’, in Spiritual Shakespeares, ed. Ewan Fernie (London and New York: Routledge, 2005), pp. 28-49. Link to e-book on Moodle.
  • Rothman, J., ‘A Vindication of Parolles’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 23 (1972), pp. 183-96. Copy on Moodle.
  • Schwarz, Kathryn, ‘“My intents are fix’d”: Constant Will in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 58 (2007), 200-27. Copy on Moodle.
  • Scragg, Leah, ‘All’s Well That Ends Well and the Tale of the Chivalric Quest’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 29-53.
  • Simonds, Peggy M., ‘Sacred and Sexual Motifs in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Renaissance Quarterly, 42 (1989), pp. 33-59. Copy on Moodle.
  • Snyder, Susan, ‘Naming Names in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 43 (1992), 265-79. Copy on Moodle.
  • Styan, J. L., All’s Well That Ends Well, Shakespeare in Performance (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1984).
  • Sullivan, Garrett A., Jr., ‘“Be this sweet Helen's knell, and now forget her”: Forgetting, Memory, and Identity in All’s Well That Ends Well’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 50 (1999), pp. 51-69. Copy on Moodle.
  • Traister, Barbara Howard, ‘Doctor She: Healing and Sex in All’s Well That Ends Well’, in A Companion to Shakespeare, Volume 1V: The Poems, Problem Comedies, Late Plays, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean Howard (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003).
  • Waller, Gary (ed.), ‘All’s Well That Ends Well’: New Critical Essays (London and New York, Routledge, 2006).
  • Wheeler, Richard P., Shakespeare’s Development and the Problem Comedies: Turn and Counter-Turn (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981), Ch. 11.
  • Zitner, Sheldon P., All’s Well That Ends Well (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1989).

Measure for Measure                        

  • Adelman, Janet, Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare’s Plays, Hamlet to The Tempest (New York and London: Routledge, 1992), Ch. 4: ‘Marriage and the Maternal Body: On Marriage as the End of Comedy in All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure’. Copy on Moodle.
  • Berger, Harry, Making Trifles of Terrors: Redistributing Complicities in Shakespeare (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997), Ch. 14: ‘What Does the Duke Know and When Does He Know It? Carrying the Torch in Measure for Measure’, pp. 335-426.
  • Bernthal, Craig A., ‘Staging Justice: James I and the Trial Scenes of Measure for Measure’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 32 (1992), pp. 247-69. Copy on Moodle.
  • Burkhardt, Louis, ‘Spectator Seduction: Measure for Measure’, Texas Studies in English Literature and Language, 37 (1995), 236-63. Copy on Moodle.
  • Bloom, Harold, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (London: Fourth Estate, 1999), pp. 358-80.
  • Bradshaw, Graham, Shakespeare’s Scepticism (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1987), Ch. 5: ‘Tempering Mercy with Justice: Measure for Measure’, pp. 164-218. Copy on Moodle.
  • Crane, Mary Thomas, ‘Male Pregnancy and Cognitive Permeability in Measure for Measure’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 49 (1998), pp. 269-92. Copy on Moodle.
  • Cunningham, Karen, ‘Opening Doubts Upon the Law: Measure for Measure’, in A Companion to Shakespeare, Volume 1V: The Poems, Problem Comedies, Late Plays, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean Howard (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003).
  • Dawson, Anthony B., ‘Measure for Measure, New Historicism, and Theatrical Power’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 39 (1988), pp. 328-41. Copy on Moodle.
  • Digangi, Mario, ‘Pleasure and Danger: Measuring Female Sexuality in Measure for Measure’, English Literary History, 60 (1993), 589-609. Copy on Moodle.
  • Dollimore, Jonathan, ‘Transgression and Surveillance in Measure for Measure’, in Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism, ed. Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield, 2nd edn (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994), pp. 72-87; also in Shakespeare’s Comedies, ed. Gary Waller (London and New York: Longman, 1991) and in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 95-112.
  • Engle, Lars, ‘Measure for Measure and Modernity: The Problem of the Sceptic’s Authority’, in Shakespeare and Modernity: Early Modern to Millennium, ed. Hugh Grady (London and New York: Routledge, 2000), pp. 85-104.
  • Fernie, Ewan, Shame in Shakespeare (London and New York: Routledge, 2002), pp. 103-8.
  • Folkerth, Wes, ‘The Willing Ear in Measure for Measure’, in his The Sound of Shakespeare (London and New York: Routledge, 2002), pp. 112-18.
  • Friedman, Michael D., ‘“O, Let Him Marry Her!’: Matrimony and Recompense in Measure for Measure’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 46 (1995), pp. 454-64. Copy on Moodle.
  • Goldberg, Jonathan, James I and the Politics of Literature: Jonson, Shakespeare, Donne and Their Contemporaries (Baltimore, MD and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983), Ch. 5: ‘Social Texts, Royal Measures: Donne, Jonson, and Measure for Measure’, pp. 230-9; also in
  • Kiernan Ryan (ed.), New Historicism and Cultural Materialism: A Reader (London: Edward Arnold, 1996), pp. 117-24.
  • Greenblatt, Stephen, Shakespearean Negotiations (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988), pp. 129-42.
  • Gross, Kenneth, Shakespeare’s Noise (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), Ch. 3: ‘A Disturbance of Hearing in Vienna’, pp. 68-101.
  • Gurr, Andrew, ‘Measure for Measure’s Hoods and Masks: The Duke, Isabella, and Liberty’, English Literary Renaissance, 27 (1997), pp. 89-105. Copy on Moodle.
  • Hall, Jonathan, Anxious Pleasures: Shakespearean Comedy and the Nation-State (Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 1995), Ch. 13: ‘Measure for Measure and the Displacement of Carnival’, pp. 235-56.
  • Hampton-Reeves, Stuart, Measure for Measure, Shakespeare Handbooks (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2006).
  • Hawkins, Harriet, Measure for Measure (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1987).
  • Healy, Margaret, Fictions of Disease in Early Modern England (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2001), pp. 172-87.
  • Holderness, Graham, ‘Crossing the Moat: Mariana’, in Measure for Measure, ed. Linda Cookson and Bryan Loughrey, Longman Critical Essays (Harlow: Longman, 1991), pp. 67-74.
  • Howard, Jean E., ‘Measure for Measure and the Restraints of Convention’, Essays in Literature, 10 (1983), pp. 149-58.
  • Kamps, Ivo, and Karen Raber (eds), Measure for Measure: Texts and Contexts (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004).
  • Kermode, Frank, Shakespeare’s Language (London: Allen Lane, 2000), pp. 142-64.
  • Knight, G. Wilson, The Wheel of Fire, fourth edn (London: Methuen, 1949), Ch. 4: ‘Measure for Measure and the Gospels’, pp. 73-96.
  • Knoppers, Laura Lunger, ‘(En)gendering Shame: Measure for Measure and the Spectacles of  Power’, English Literary Renaissance, 23 (1993), pp. 450-71.
  • Leavis, F. R., ‘Measure for Measure’ in his The Common Pursuit (London: Chatto and Windus, 1952), pp. 160-72.
  • Leggatt, Alexander, ‘Substitution in Measure for Measure’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 39 (1988), pp. 342-59. Copy on Moodle.
  • Lindley, David, ‘The Stubbornness of Barnardine: Justice and Mercy in Measure for Measure’, Shakespeare Yearbook (1996), pp. 333-51.
  • Little, Arthur L., ‘Absolute Bodies, Absolute Laws: Staging Punishment in Measure for Measure’, in Gillian Murray Kendall (ed.), Shakespearean Power and Punishment (London: Associated University Presses, 1998), pp. 113-29.
  • Lupton, Julia Reinhard, ‘Antigone in Vienna’, in her Citizen–Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2005), pp. 127-57.
  • Macdonald, Ronald R., ‘Measure for Measure: The Flesh made Word’, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 30 (1990), 265-82. Copy on Moodle.
  • Marcus, Leah, ‘London in Measure for Measure’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 113-25.
  • Marowitz, Charles, Measure for Measure, in Adaptations of Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology of Plays from the Seventeenth Century to the Present, ed. Daniel Fischlin and Mark Fortier (London and New York: Routledge, 2000), pp. 188-207.
  • Maus, Katharine Eisaman, Inwardness and Theater in the English Renaissance (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1995), Ch. V, Part II: ‘Sexual Secrecy in Measure for Measure’, pp. 157-81.
  • McCandless, David, ‘“I’ll Pray to Increase Your Bondage”: Power and Punishment in Measure for Measure’, in Gillian Murray Kendall (ed.), Shakespearean Power and Punishment (London: Associated University Presses, 1998), pp. 89-112.
  • McLuskie, Kathleen, ‘The Patriarchal Bard: Feminist Criticism and Shakespeare: King Lear and Measure for Measure’, in Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism, ed. Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield, second edn (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994), pp. 88-108, esp. pp. 92-8.
  • Nevo, Ruth, ‘Measure for Measure: Mirror for Mirror’, Shakespeare Survey, 40 (1988), pp. 107-22. Copy on Moodle.
  • Nicholls, Graham, Measure for Measure: Text and Performance (London: Macmillan, 1986).
  • Pater, Walter, Appreciations (London: Macmillan, 1989), pp. 176-91.
  • Rose, Jacqueline, ‘Sexuality in the Reading of Shakespeare: Hamlet and Measure for Measure’, in Alternative Shakespeares, ed. John Drakakis (London and New York: Methuen, 1985), pp. 95-118, esp. pp. 103-8, 117-18.
  • Rossiter, A.P., Angel with Horns and Other Shakespeare Lectures (London: Longman, 1961), Ch. 8.
  • Ryan, Kiernan, ‘Measure for Measure: Marxism Before Marx’, in Marxist Shakespeares, ed. Jean Howard and Scott Shershow (New York and London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 227-44; shorter version, ‘Measure for Measure: Double Trouble’, in Ryan, Shakespeare, 3rd edn (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002), pp. 133-47. Link to e-book on Moodle.
  • Shell, Marc, The End of Kinship: ‘Measure for Measure’, Incest and the Ideal of Universal Siblinghood (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988).
  • Shuger, Debora, Political Theologies in Shakespeare’s England: The Sacred and the State in ‘Measure for Measure’ (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2001).
  • Stead, C. K. (ed.), Measure for Measure: A Casebook (London: Macmillan, 1971).
  • Thatcher, David, ‘Questionable Purpose in Measure for Measure: A Test of Seeming or a Seeming Test?’, English Literary Renaissance, 25 (1995), pp. 26-44.
  • Watson, Robert N., ‘False Immortality in Measure for Measure: Comic Means, Tragic Ends’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 41(1990), 411-32.  Copy on Moodle.
  • Watson, Robert N., ‘The State of Life and the Power of Death: Measure for Measure’, in Gillian Murray Kendall (ed.), Shakespearean Power and Punishment (London: Associated University Presses, 1998), pp. 130-56.
  • Wharton, T. F., Measure for Measure: The Critics Debate (London: Macmillan, 1989).
  • Wilson, Richard, Will Power: Essays on Shakespearean Authority (Hemel Hempstead: Harvester
  • Wheatsheaf), Ch. 5: ‘The Quality of Mercy: Discipline and Punishment in Shakespearean Comedy’, pp. 118-31.
  • Wood, Nigel (ed.), Theory in Practice: Measure for Measure (Buckingham: Open University Press, 1996).

Studies of the Problem Plays as a Group

  • Adelman, Janet, ‘Bed Tricks: On Marriage as the End of Comedy in All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure’, in Shakespeare’s Personality, ed. Norman Holland, Sidney Homan and Bernard Paris (Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 1989), pp. 151-74. Copy on Moodle.
  • Barker, Simon (ed.), Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005).
  • Briggs, Julia, ‘Shakespeare’s Bed-Tricks’, Essays in Criticism, 44 (1994), pp. 293-314. Copy on Moodle.
  • Cohen, Eileen Z., ‘“Virtue is bold”: The Bed-trick and Characterization in All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure’, Philological Quarterly, 65 (1986), pp. 171-86. Copy on Moodle.
  • Desens, Marliss C., The Bed-Trick in English Renaissance Drama: Explorations in Gender, Sexuality, and Power (Newark: University of Delaware Press; London and Toronto: AUP, 1994).
  • Eagleton, Terry, William Shakespeare (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986), Ch. 3: ‘Law: The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida’.
  • Foakes, R.A., Shakespeare: The Dark Comedies to the Last Plays: From Satire to Celebration (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1971).
  • Frye, Northrop, The Myth of Deliverance: Reflections on Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1983).
  • Hillman, Richard, Shakespeare: The Problem Plays (London and New York: Twayne, 1993).
  • Hillman, Richard, ‘Love’s Tyranny Inside-out in the Problem Plays’, in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 126-58.
  • Jankowski, Theodora A., ‘Hymeneal Blood, Interchangeable Women, and the Early Modern Marriage Economy in Measure for Measure and All’s Well That Ends Well’, in A Companion to Shakespeare,Volume 1V: The Poems, Problem Comedies, Late Plays, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean Howard (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003).
  • Leonard, Nancy S., ‘Substitution in Shakespeare’s Problem Plays’, English Literary Renaissance, 9 (1979), pp. 281-301.
  • Lawrence, W. W., Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies (New York: Macmillan, 1931).
  • Maquerlot, Jean-Pierre, Shakespeare and the Mannerist Tradition: A Reading of Five Problem Plays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).
  • McCandless, David, Gender and Performance in Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies, Drama and Performance Studies (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997).
  • Marsh, Nicholas, Shakespeare: Three Problem Plays, Analysing Texts (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003).
  • Mowat, Barbara A., ‘Shakespearean Tragicomedy’, in Renaissance Tragicomedy: Explorations in Genre and Politics (New York: AMS Press, 1987), pp. 80-96.
  • Muir, Kenneth and Stanley Wells (eds), Aspects of Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Articles Reprinted from Shakespeare Survey (London and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982).              
  • Palmer, D.J. (ed.), Shakespeare’s Later Comedies (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971).
  • Rhodes, Neil, ‘The Controversial Plot: Declamation and the Concept of the “Problem Play”’, Modern Language Review, 95 (2000), pp. 609-22. Copy on Moodle.
  • Rossiter, A.P., Angel with Horns and Other Shakespeare Lectures (London: Longman, 1961), Ch. 6: ‘The Problem Plays’. Copy on Moodle.
  • Thomas, Vivian, The Moral Universe of Shakespeare’s Problem Plays (New York: Routledge, Chapman & Hall, 1991).
  • Thomas, Vivian, ‘Shakespeare’s Problem Plays: Concepts and Perspectives’, in Shakespeare’s Problem  Plays: Contemporary Critical Essays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), pp. 21-8.
  • Tillyard, E.M.W., Shakespeare’s Problem Plays (London: Chatto & Windus, 1949).
  • Watson, Shawn, ‘Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies: An Hegelian Approach to Genre’, in Drama and Philosophy, ed. James Redmond (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 61-71.
  • Welsh, Alexander, ‘The Loss of Men and Getting of Children: All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure’, Modern Language Review, 73 (1978), pp. 17-28. Copy on Moodle.
  • Wheeler, Richard P., Shakespeare’s Development and the Problem Comedies: Turn and Counter-Turn (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981).
  • Wilders, John, ‘The Problem Plays: Troilus and Cressida, All’s Well That Ends Well, and Measure for Measure’, in Stanley Wells (ed.), Shakespeare: A Bibliographical Guide (Oxford: Clarendon, 1990), pp. 137-58.
  • Yachnin, Paul, ‘Shakespeare’s Problem Plays and the Drama of His Time: Troilus and Cressida, All’s Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure’, in A Companion to Shakespeare, Volume 1V: The Poems, Problem Comedies, Late Plays, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean Howard (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003).

 

 

  
 
 
 
 

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