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Home > Courses > Undergraduate > European and International Studies (French)
More in this section Politics & International Relations

European and International Studies (French) BA

UCAS code R100
Year of entry 2018
Course Length
4 years full time
Department Politics and International Relations »
Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures »

European and International Studies explores the key areas of contemporary European politics and international relations, and combines these with the in-depth study of French language, society and culture. Taught in partnership between the Department of Politics and International Relations and the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, this course is informed by the outstanding research and international outlook of both departments.

The politics element of the course provides an introduction to the working of international relations and the growth of Europe as a political entity. This includes research into areas such as Brexit, the European Union’s Budget, the European Parliament, security, international diplomacy, and the use of military force, as well as European languages and cultures. Your second and final year courses in European politics and international relations will be taught by Giacomo Benedetto, who holds a Jean Monnet professorship in European integration awarded by the European Union.

The prominence of France and the French-speaking countries when it comes to literature, art, thought and culture makes the study of the French language highly rewarding and engaging.

As a modern linguist, you will not only learn to speak and write fluently, you will also develop excellent communication and research skills and combine language proficiency with cross-cultural perspectives.

As a part of Royal Holloway’s close-knit international community based in our beautiful historic campus, you will be within easy reach of London, France’s “sixth biggest city”, with its wealth of French cultural resources. You will also have the exciting opportunity to spend a year working, teaching or studying in France or a French-speaking country, when you will immerse yourself in the language and culture and truly broaden your horizons. Among the universities we have exchange links with is Sciences Po Strasbourg, one of France’s most respected schools for politics and international relations.

  • Whether you are a beginner or advanced student when you start, by the time you graduate you will be fluent in French: confident in reading, understanding and analysing text and able to write with ease and accuracy.
  • Modern Languages research staff are engaged in research at the highest level internationally; we are in the top 10 of UK Modern Language departments for research quality and the top in London (Research Assessment Exercise 2014).
  • We have an active and engaged student community, with opportunities for you to take part in debating, Model United Nations and party political societies on campus.
  • In the Department of Politics and International Relations we offer students research placement opportunities with our staff, gaining valuable experience of working at the forefront of political enquiry.

Core modules

Year 1

For European Studies you will take:

Introduction to International Relations

This module offers a broad introduction to theory and history in international relations since 1870. You will look at a variety of different theoretical lenses, ranging from orthodox to critical perspectives, in order to understand events from the collapse of the Bismarckian European order and the origins of World War 1 to the contemporary War on Terror. Along the way you will also explore the origins and the end of the Cold War, decolonisation and the End of Empire, the rise of international institutions, humanitarian intervention and new security issues.

Introduction to Politics and Government

This module will introduce you to the academic study of politics and to the ‘real world’ of contemporary politics. You will be equipped with the essential tools to understand the nature of politics and analyse the way different political systems work. You will be introduced to key concepts such as politics, power, rights, ideologies, democracy and representation, and will learn about the different actors, institutions and processes that make up politics today.

If you choose to study French ab initio (from scratch) you will take Intensive French for Beginners 1. If you have studied the language to A-level (or equivalent) standard you will take Pratique du Français 1. If you are a native speaker then you will take French Language - Culture and Translation.

Intensive French for Beginners I

In this module you will develop your core skills in French without prior knowledge of the language. You will look at the basic French grammatical structures and examine the diversity of culture in Francophone countries. You will gain confidence in conversing everyday matters with clear pronounciation, and read simple written texts in French. You will become familiar with writing short paragraphs in French on everyday matters, or in answer to reading comprehension questions, and enhance your comprehension skills to understand simple recordings and conversations.

Pratique du Français I

In this module you will develop your skills in writing, speaking and comprehending the French language, building a wide and specific vocabulary. In written French, you will look at a range of themes, including French Institutions, the French Revolution, 'Laïcité' and 'La francophonie'. In spoken French, you will discuss and present on a variety of audio-visual materials as well as texts, with topics linked to French current affairs, media, cultural issues in French and other Francophone countries. In the practice seminars, you will gain enhanced listening comprehension skills, oral skills and knowledge of grammatical structure.

French Language - Culture and Translation

In this module you will develop an understanding of both French-English translation and critical analysis of French-language material. You will look at a range of source material, which may include prose fiction, poetry, drama, film, graphic novels, multimedia and web content, and / or newspaper and magazine articles. You will closely examine the syntactical, stylistic, lexical and culturally specific features of a range of French-language text types, and explore published translations of French material to discern the translation strategies adopted. You will consider a range of translation issues, including cultural specificity, untranslatability, intercultural communication, as well as stylistic features, idioms, techniques of linguistic compensation, and word order.

Year 2

For European Studies you will take:

Understanding the European Union - Politics and Theory

In this module you will analyse the contemporary politics of the European Union and its institutions, amid the challenges of the triple crisis of economics, migration and Brexit. You will learn about the political history of European integration after 1949 and the contemporary theory of European integration. The first term will begin with an introduction to the European Union as a political system followed by an overview of the European Union's historical development.  The second term will focus on contestation of the European Union and the theories that underpin this, in order to explain how the EU developed and the challenges that it faces. Topics will include Euroscepticism, party politics, public opinion, Brexit and EU-UK relations, and European Parliament elections. The theory sessions comprise of federalism, neo-functionalism, liberal intergovernmentalism and the new institutionalisms.

If you are stuyding French ab initio (from scratch) you will take Intensive French for Beginners 2. If you have taken the subject to A-level (or equivalent) standard you will take Pratique du Français 2. If you are a native speaker then you will take Advanced French Translation - Skills and Practice

Intensive French for Beginners 2

In this module you will further develop your ability to communicate effectively in French, in writing or orally, with good grammatical and lexical accuracy. You will look at texts from a variety of sources and examine authentic recordings from a range of subjects. Much of the content is delivered in French, with the exception of grammar classes, which are taught in English.

Pratique du Français 2

In this module you will further develop your ability to communicate effectively in French, enhancing your linguistic and analytical skills. You will learn to write concisely, accurately and effectively, paying particular attention to style and register as well as to specific methods of analysis. You will study key themes, such as ‘Le travail en France’, ‘le malaise social’, and ‘les jeunes et la société’, gaining an enhanced understanding of contemporary French cultural and social issues. You will read and analyse texts from a variety of sources, ranging from literature to journalism, with particular focus on how to structure an argument. You will also look at the techniques of film analysis.

Advanced French Translation - Skills and Practice

In this module you will develop an understanding of translation from French to English through sustained translation practice. You will look at the syntactical, stylistic, lexical and culturally specific problems generated when translating from French source text to English target text in a range of translation scenarios and across range of text types. You will consider common translation challenges, such as conversion, transfer, compensation, gloss, exoticism, deceptive cognates, lexical gaps and cultural specificities, as well as examining the constraints of character count and house style.

Year 3

The third year of this degree programme will be spent abroad, either studying, working, or both. It is usually expected that you will spend at least 9 months in a country where the native language is the same as the language you are studying. The School of Modern Languages, Literatures & Cultures will support you in finding a suitable study or work placement, but you will also be expected to explore opportunities independently. Ultimate responsibility for securing such a placement lies with yourself. Alternatively, you may choose to enrol for modules at a partner university in your chosen country. This year forms an integral part of your degree programme. If you undertake a placement then you will be asked to complete assessed work which will be credited towards your degree, while in the case of those studying at a university, marks obtained for modules taken will be credited towards your degree. The same applies to your practical oral assessment on return to Royal Holloway from your year abroad.

Year 4

For European Studies you will take:

European Union Public Policy

In thid module you will develop an understanding of regulation in the European Union, including delivery of policy and administration. You will look at how the world's largest market operatures, with a focus on EU public policy, including de-regulation, re-regulation, budgets and spending. You will examine the concept of the single market, the Euro and its crisis, justice, home affairs and counter-terrorism, the EU budget, agriculture, regional development, and social and environmental politicies.

European Union Foreign Policy

In this module you will develop an understanding of the European Union's foreign relations, focussing on political, security and economic impacts. You will examine its international role, looking at the Common Foreign and Security Policy, its relationship with NATO, the USA and Russia, its connection to immediate neighbours in Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean, and its role in global trade negotiations.

If you are stuyding French then you will take Pratique du Français 3.

Pratique du Français 3

In this module you will enhance your ability to analyse and compare written material from different sources. You will develop competence in accurate and discursive French, and extend your oral presentation skills, with particular emphasis on the formal spoken register. You will look at extracts from French documentaries and feature films, and listen to recordings and podcasts, such as the France Inter and France Culture programmes. You will also look at a range of of cultural questions and examine the key features of French culture and society.

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

Year 1

Comparative Literature and Culture: The Birth of Film

Comparative Literature and Culture: Visual Arts 1 - An Introduction to Visual Media

Comparative Literature and Culture: The Visual Image in French Culture and Society

Comparative Literature and Culture: The Individual and Society - Key Works

Comparative Literature and Culture: German History and Culture - Past and Present

Comparative Literature and Culture: Introduction to German Studies

Comparative Literature and Culture: Culture and Identity in Latin America

Comparative Literature and Culture: Authors and Readers in Twentieth Century Spanish-American fiction

Comparative Literature and Culture: Comparative Hispanic Culture

Comparative Literature and Culture: The Heritage of Dante and the Renaissance

Comparative Literature and Culture: Building the Italian Nation - from Pinocchio to the Leopard

Comparative Literature and Culture: Facist Italy

Management: International Business

Management: Markets and Consumption

Management: Accounting

Management: Organisational Studies

History: Republic, Kings and People - European Political Thought from Plato to Rousseau

History: The Rich Tapestry of Life - Early Modern England, Europe and the Wider World, 1453 to 1789

History: Conflict and Identity in the Modern World from 1789 to the present

Geography: Physical Geography 1 - Atmosphere, Oceans and the Geosphere

Geography: Introduction to Human Geography

Geography: Physical Geography 2 - Biogeography, Ecology and Scales of Change

Geography: Geographies of Development

Politics and International Relations: Introduction to Politics and Government

Optional cultural modules in French include:

The Visual Image in French Culture and Society

 

Introduction to French Literature - Critical Skills

 

The Individual and Society - Key Works

 

French History Through Film

 

Year 2

Comparative Literature and Culture: International Film 2 - Readings and Representations

Comparative Literature and Culture: Visual Arts 2 - Genres and Movements

Comparative Literature and Culture: Gender and Clothing in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture

Comparative Literature and Culture: Writing Romance and Desire

Comparative Literature and Culture: Cinema in France - From Modernism to the Postmodern

Comparative Literature and Culture: Death, Desire, Decline, Thomas Mann and Franz Kafka

Comparative Literature and Culture: Love and Marriage in Major Novels by Theodor Fontane

Comparative Literature and Culture: Representations of Childhood and Youth in Modern German Culture

Comparative Literature and Culture: Philosophy and the Arts

Comparative Literature and Culture: Constructing Identity in Contemporary Spanish Film

Comparative Literature and Culture: Love in the Contemporary Spanish-American Novel

Comparative Literature and Culture: Dante's Divine Comedy - theme and Ideas

Comparative Literature and Culture: Postwar Italian Cinema

Comparative Literature and Culture: Renaissance Florence

Comparative Literature and Culture: Italian Crime Fiction

Comparative Literature and Culture: Boccaccio - Decameron

Management: Strategic Management

Management: Marketing Strategy in Context

Management: Managerial Accounting

Management: Human Resource Management

History: From Blood and Guts to the Worried Well - Medicine in Britain, 1750 to 1990

History: The Russian Empire in the Age of Reform and Revolution, 1856 to 1917

History: Spain in Conflict, 1930 to 1953

History: Nationalism, Democracy and Minorities, 1918 to 1945

History: Modern Political Ideas

History: Children of the Revolution? France from 1789 to the Great War

History: From Constantinople to Alexandria - Eastern Mediterranean Cities, 1798 to 1956

History: The European Cruciple, 1914 to 1945

History: Ninteenth Century Europe - Society and Culture, 1789 to 1905

History: Daily Life in Renaissance and Baroque Italian Cities - Social and Domestic Life

History: The Victorians - Brtitish History, 1837 to 1901

History: Spain, 1898 to 1939

History: History of the British Empire, 1763 to 1900

History: The Politics of Postwar Europe, 1945 to 2000

History: The Georgians - Societ, Culture and Crime, 1714 to 1830

History: Modern British History, 1914 to 1973

History: Spain - From Dictatorship to Democracy, 1939 to 1989

Geography: Environmental Systems - Processes and Sustainability

Geography: Geomorphology

Geography: Environmental Change

Geography: Biogeography

Geography: Political Geography

Geography: Cities, Economies and Ecologies

Geography: Cultural Geographies and the Modern World

Geography: Perspectives of Development

Politics and International Relations: International Relations Theory

Politics and International Relations: Introduction to Global Studies

Politics and International Relations: Democracy in Britain

Politics and International Relations: Contemporary Poltical Theory

Politics and International Relations: International Organisations

Optional cultural modules in French include:

Approaches to Translation Work

 

Socio-Political Issues of Contemporary France in Fiction and Translation

 

Writing Romance and Desire

 

Cinema in France

 

Year 4

Comparative Literature and Culture: From Aestheticism to the Avant-Garde

Comparative Literature and Culture: Trends in Contemporary Theory

Comparative Literature and Culture: Transnational Cinema

Comparative Literature and Culture: Postcolonial Literatures

Comparative Literature and Culture: Arthurian Romance - Chretien de Troyes

Comparative Literature and Culture: Image, Identity and Consumer Culture

Comparative Literature and Culture: Text and Image in France - From Cubism to the Present

Comparative Literature and Culture: Ethics and Violence - Murder, Suicide and Genocide

Comparative Literature and Culture: Wanton Women - Artists and Writers

Comparative Literature and Culture: Blindness and Vision in French Culture

Comparative Literature and Culture: Doubles, Devils and Deadly Spiders

Comparative Literature and Culture: Narrative and Identity - The German Novel

Comparative Literature and Culture: Dream Factories - Recent German Film

Comparative Literature and Culture: Of Women, Knights, Weapons and Loves

Comparative Literature and Culture: Shooting History - Dictatorship, Terror and Crime

Comparative Literature and Culture: The Postmodern in Italian Literature

Comparative Literature and Culture: Dissertation

Management: International Financial Accounting

Management: Consumer Behaviour

Management: Emerging Markets

Management: Asia Pacific Multinationals

Management: European Business

Management: Accounting for Corporate Accountability

Management: Globalisation and Employment - The India and China Experience

Management: International Human Resource Management

Management: The Individual at Work

Management: Business in International Competitive Perspective

Management: Brands and Branding

Management: Global Marketing

Management: Strategic Management Accounting

Management: Strategic Finance

Management: Adveritisng and Communications

Management: Clusters, Small Business and International Competition

Management: Business Data Analytics

Management: Digital Innovation Management

Management: Enterprise Systems Management

Management: Project Management

Management: Small Business Management and Growth

Management: Entrepreneurship - Theory and History

Management: Corporate Entrepreneurship and Strategy

Management: Strategic Entrpreneurship

Management: Innovation, Strategy and the Corporation

Management: Ethical and Environmental Economics

Management: Accounting for Sustainability

Management: Corporate Governance

Management: Ethical Marketing

History: Froom Blood and Guts to the Worries Well - Medicine in Britain, 1750 to 1990

History: The Russian Empire in the Age of Reform and Revolution, 1856 to 1917

History: Spain in Conflict, 1930 to 1953

History: Nationalism, Democracy and Minorities, 1918 to 1945

History: Modern Poltical Ideas

History: Children of the Revolution? France from 1789 to the Great War

History: From Constantinople to Alexandria - Eastern Mediterranean Cities, 1798 to 1956

History: The European Crucible, 1914 to 1945

History: Nineteeth Century Europe - Society and Culture, 1789 to 1905

History: Daily Life in Renaissance and Baroque Italian Cities - Social and Domestic Life

History: The Victorians - British History, 1837 to 1901

History: Spain, 1898 to 1939

History: History of the British Empire, 1763 to 1900

History: The Politics of Postwar Europe, 1945 to 2000

History: The Georgians - Society, Culture and Crime, 1714 to 1830

History: Modern British History, 1914 to 1973

History: Spain - From Dictatorship to Democracy, 1939 to 1989

Geography: Rivers and Landscapes

Geography: Defending Coastal and Wetland Environments

Geography: Savannas

Geography: Global Warming

Geography: Regeneration and Urban Policy

Geography: Geographies of Commodities 

Geography: Geopolitics of Media and Communications

Geography: Exploration, Science and the Making of Geography

Geography: Creative Geographies

Geography: Critical GIS

Geography: Conservation Biogeography

Geography: Wetland Environments - Process and Policy

Geography: Glacial Environments

Geography: Digital Landscapes

Geography: Arid Africa

Geography: Images of Earth - Homer to Google

Geography: Geography of Museums and Collections

Geography: Geopolitics on Film

Geography: Geographies of Home

Geography: Mobilities

Geography: Fair Trade

Geography: Cities and Development

Politics and International Relations: Comparatice Democracy and Elections

Politics and International Relations: Comparative Foreign Policy

Politics and International Relations: Young People's Politics

Politics and International Relations:  Advanced Seminar in British Politics

Politics and International Relations: Defence in the Post-Cold War World

Politics and International Relations: Statecraft and Diplomacy

Politics and International Relations: Dissertation

Optional cultural modules in French include:

French Advanced Translating Skills

 

Image, Identity and Consumer Culture in Post-war French Fiction and Film

 

Text and Image in France - From Cubism to the Present

 

Ethics and Violence - Murder, Suicide and Genocide in Literature and Film

 

Artists and Writers of the French Avant-Garde

 

Blindness and Vision in French Culture

 

Villains and Villainy in Seventeenth Century France

 

French Dissertation

 

The course has a modular structure, whereby you will take 14 units at the rate of four per year in the first, second and fourth years, plus two in the third year, which is spent working or studying abroad. Most modules contain an element of assessed coursework, which contributes to the final mark awarded.

Your first year is formative, though your results will determine whether you can progress to the second year. Your second and fourth year results, alongside those of the third year spent abroad, will contribute to your final degree classifcation. Work completed in your fourth year will count for a larger proportion of the result.

You will be assigned a personal tutor who will provide you with support, guidance and advice throughout your studies.

You will also have access to the comprehensive e-learning facility Moodle, which features lecture handouts and other supporting materials, such as lecture slides, quizzes, video clips, and links to relevant academic journal articles.

Study time

Proportions of study time will vary depending on modules taken, but typically:

Year 1

You will spend 17% of your study time in scheduled learning and teaching activities, and 83% in guided independent study.

Year 2

You will spend 18% of your study time in scheduled learning and teaching activities, and 82% in guided independent study.

Year 3

You will spend 100% of your time on placement.

Year 4

You will spend 17% of your study time in scheduled learning and teaching activities, and 83% in guided independent study.

Assessment

Proportions of assessment types will vary depending on modules taken, but typically:

Year 1

Written exams account for 45% of the total assessment for this year of study, 19% will be assessed through practical exams, and 36% will be assessed through coursework.

Year 2

Written exams account for 49% of the total assessment for this year of study, 17% will be assessed through practical exams, and 34% will be assessed through coursework.

Year 3

Practical exams account for 50% of the total assessment for this year of study, and 50% will be assessed through coursework.

Year 4

Written exams account for 49% of the total assessment for this year of study, 23% will be assessed through practical exams, and 28% will be assessed through coursework.

Typical offers

Typical offers
A-levels

ABB-BBB 
How we assess your application:  predicted grades lower than our typical offers are considered.  Read more about what we look for here.

  • Where an applicant is taking the EPQ alongside A-levels, the EPQ will be taken into consideration and result in lower A-level grades being required.
  • Socio-economic factors which may have impacted an applicant’s education will be taken into consideration and alternative offers may be made to these applicants
Required/preferred subjects

Required subjects: 

  • At least one A Level in an essay based subject.
  • At least five GCSEs at grade A*-C or 9 - 4 including English and Mathematics.
  • Grade B at A level in French for the advanced level language pathway.For the beginners language pathway there is no language requirement. 
Other UK Qualifications
International Baccalaureate 5,5,5 at Higher Level including an essay based subject with a minimum of 32 points overall.
BTEC Extended Diploma Distinction, Distinction, Distinction in a relevant subject 
BTEC National Extended Diploma Distinction, Distinction in a relevant subject plus A-Level grade B in an essay based subject. 
BTEC National Extended Certificate Distinction plus A level grades B,B including an essay-based subject. 
Welsh Baccalaureate Requirements are as for A-levels where one non-subject-specified A-level can be replaced by the same grade in the Welsh Baccalaureate - Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate
Scottish Advanced Highers

ABB-BBB if French is taken at Higher Level a grade B is required

Scottish Highers

AABBB if French is taken at Higher Level a grade B is required

Irish Leaving Certificate H2, H2, H3, H3, H3 at Higher Level including H3 in an essay-based subject, if French is taken at Higher Level a grade H3 is required 
Access to Higher Education Diploma

Pass with at least 15 level 3 credits at Distinction and the remaining level 3 credits at Merit in a relevant subject area. Please note that the Access to Higher Education Diploma will only be acceptable if the applicant has had a considerable break from education.

Other UK qualifications

Please select your UK qualification from the drop-down list below



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International and EU entry requirements

Please select your country from the drop-down list below

English language
requirements

IELTS 6.5 overall with 7.0 in writing and a minimum of 5.5 in each remaining subscore

  • For equivalencies please see here 

For more information about entry requirements for your country please visit our International pages. For international students who do not meet the direct entry requirements, we offer an International Foundation Year, run by Study Group at the Royal Holloway International Study Centre. Upon successful completion, students can progress on to selected undergraduate degree programmes at Royal Holloway, University of London.

A global economy offers exciting opportunities to those wanting to pursue successful and rewarding careers. An ability to speak several languages and a keen analytical mind are among the most sought-after qualities in today’s highly competitive job market; European Studies equips students with both.

Our European Studies and International Relations course fosters a deeper cultural understanding of a foreign language which can be a great asset in industries such as export, trade and international marketing. In these fields, workers need to build and maintain solid relationships with foreign partners, so a cultural understanding can help workers anticipate foreign clients’ expectations. Many government jobs require language skills, particularly in the sectors of immigration and diplomacy.

This course produces high calibre graduates with the skills and knowledge to fully exploit every opportunity including those presented during the study year abroad. Studies show that students who have spent time abroad as part of their degree programme gain higher status and better paid jobs. As part of the study year abroad, those of our students who wish to pursue a career in teaching can apply to work as an English language assistant in a continental school. Alternatively, there is an opportunity to spend the year in employment on an approved work placement (former students have worked for companies such as IBM in Marseilles and Ferrari at Marinello, Italy) or apply to work as an intern for an MEP or in a European institution in the host country. This latter option is a popular choice for European Studies students who wish to gain work experience in politics.

Our outstanding record of success for work and further study puts Royal Holloway in the top 10 for graduate career prospects (Complete University Guide, 2015). It goes to show that our degree programmes not only promote academic achievement but also the means to hone the life-skills necessary to excel, post-graduation.  Our students have an excellent record of finding appropriate and interesting professions. In fact, six-months after graduation, 95% of our most recent graduates (Unistats 2015) are enhancing their skills with further study or forging careers in companies and institutions such as:

  • The European Commission
  • Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative
  • Citi
  • Proctor & Gamble
  • Bloomberg
  • Henry Jackson Society
  • Mazda Motor Europe
  • British Council
  • Oxfam Head Office
  • Merlin Entertainments Group
  • Ralph Lauren

Home and EU students tuition fee per year*: £9,250

International students tuition fee per year**: £16,500

Other essential costs***: The cost of your year abroad will vary by country. Typical living costs to consider will be accommodation, food and household items, entertainment, travel, books and bills (including your mobile phone). You'll also need to budget for travel to and from your country of study. Additional costs compared to studying in the UK will also depend on personal choices and it is important to research the cost of living before the year commences.

How do I pay for it?  Find out more about funding options, including loans, grants, scholarships and bursaries.

*Tuition fees for UK and EU nationals starting a degree in the academic year 2017/18 will be £9,250 for that year, and is shown for reference purposes only. The tuition fee for UK and EU undergraduates starting their degrees in 2018 is controlled by Government regulations, and details are not yet known. The UK Government has also announced that EU students starting an undergraduate degree in 2018/19 will pay the same level of fee as a UK student for the duration of their degree.

**Fees for international students may increase year-on-year in line with the rate of inflation. Royal Holloway's policy is that any increases in fees will not exceed 5% for continuing students. For further information see fees and funding and our  terms & conditions.

***These estimated costs relate to studying this particular degree programme at Royal Holloway. Costs, such as accommodation, food, books and other learning materials and printing etc., have not been included.

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