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City in the City: Contemporary Importance

The aim of the project is to sponsor debate on the built environment and community building. This is an issue of abiding political concern and social concern. From projects on urban renewal, through concern at social degeneration, and worries on social segregation and the development of an urban 'under-class', communities, urban environment, and political and social idealism are inextricably central to our public debate. 

A desire for new Garden Cities was at the centre of Miliband’s speech of 24th September 2013 to the Labour Party Conference. The coalition government’s ‘Big Society’ initiative (see Cameron’s speech of 14th February 2011) builds on a political philosophy that has arisen in reaction to debates on urbanism and in particular the Classicism inherent in the building of new communities. 

The project focuses on representation of the city and its heritage in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, the moment when many of our cities received their distinctive shape and also when the 'truths' inherent in the town-planning movement came to be decided and accepted.  

This is a project which centres on the Classical and the built community and the influence of academic and intellectual debate on the general community. It is, thus, a case study in the relationship between intellectual endevour and the building of the world in which we live. 

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