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School Seminar- Dr Veronica Grieneisen

Location
BLT2
Date(s)
24/02/2016 (16:00-17:00)
Description
Arabidopsis

Arabidopsis

Host - Prof Laszlo Bogre

Dr Veronica Grieneisen

John Innes Centre, Norwich

"Tuning into the Cellular Symphony of Development: Cell Shape Polarity and Leaf Growth"

My Lab

https://www.jic.ac.uk/directory/veronica-grieneisen/

aims to understand spatial regulation of intracellular cell polarity, cell shape changes, and intercellular polarity coupling and signalling in morphogenesis. 

To achieve this, we use a combination of approaches: mathematical and computational methods, experiments in Arabidopsis, and (most recently), 'experiences' with autonomous agents (robot swarms). 

In particular, we wish to unravel the complexity of the feedbacks between subcellular mechanisms of cell polarity and tissue-level patterning mechanisms, focusing on hormonal patterning, genetic regulatory networks, biophysical interactions, and the tight-interaction between plant development and the environment.

From a theoretical standpoint, our studies allow us to gain new insights on mechanisms of biological pattern formation and principles of auto-organisation. From a practical point of view, we are interested in understanding how plants control their growth and architecture, and how they optimally regulate their intake of nutrients. 

Our multi-modelling strategy captures biological processes at different levels – molecular and genetic levels, subcellular properties, cells and organs – allowing them to interact under certain hypothesis and within a 'controlled' system (which experiments do not easily permit).

 

Selected publications 1-7

 

1              el-Showk, S. et al. Parsimonious Model of Vascular Patterning Links Transverse Hormone Fluxes to Lateral Root Initiation: Auxin Leads the Way, while Cytokinin Levels Out. PLoS computational biology 11, e1004450, doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004450 (2015).

2              Isman, M. B. & Grieneisen, M. L. Botanical insecticide research: many publications, limited useful data. Trends in plant science 19, 140-145, doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2013.11.005 (2014).

3              Cruz-Ramirez, A. et al. A bistable circuit involving SCARECROW-RETINOBLASTOMA integrates cues to inform asymmetric stem cell division. Cell 150, 1002-1015, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2012.07.017 (2012).

4              Maree, A. F., Grieneisen, V. A. & Edelstein-Keshet, L. How cells integrate complex stimuli: the effect of feedback from phosphoinositides and cell shape on cell polarization and motility. PLoS computational biology 8, e1002402, doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002402 (2012).

5              Grieneisen, V. A. & Scheres, B. Back to the future: evolution of computational models in plant morphogenesis. Current opinion in plant biology 12, 606-614, doi:10.1016/j.pbi.2009.07.008 (2009).

6              Laskowski, M. et al. Root system architecture from coupling cell shape to auxin transport. PLoS biology 6, e307, doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060307 (2008).

7              Grieneisen, V. A., Xu, J., Maree, A. F., Hogeweg, P. & Scheres, B. Auxin transport is sufficient to generate a maximum and gradient guiding root growth. Nature 449, 1008-1013, doi:10.1038/nature06215 (2007).

 

 


   
 
 
 

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