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Doctoral training in Cyber Security receives more funding

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Doctoral training in Cyber Security receives more funding

  • Date04 February 2019

The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has announced that it is renewing support for the Centre for Doctoral Training in Cyber Security (CDT) at Royal Holloway, University of London, as part of the UK Government’s strategy to increase the number of highly trained cyber security experts.

Institute for Cyber Security

The EPSRC has given funding to 75 Centres for Doctoral Training across the UK, to ensure the next generation of doctoral level students are equipped to tackle research and innovation challenges across the engineering and physical sciences landscape, including subjects such as Quantum Engineering, Medical Imaging and Offshore Renewables.

The Centres will be funded through EPSRC, which has allocated £444 million and a further £2.2 million from The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

There are eight academics involved in the project at Royal Holloway include Professor Keith Martin (Director), Professor Peter Adey, Dr Martin Albrecht, Professor Carlos Cid (Deputy Director), Professor Lizzie Coles-Kemp, Dr Rikke Jensen, Professor Peter Komisarczuk and Dr Dan O’Keeffe.

Keith Martin, director of the CDT at Royal Holloway, University of London, said: “We’re thrilled to be given the opportunity to develop further cohorts of PhD cyber security researchers at Royal Holloway.

“Our existing CDT has been extremely successful, attracting outstanding students and helping to develop strong relationships with industry and government partners.

“One of the undoubted highlights of the existing CDT has been the ability to develop cyber security research projects which cross traditional disciplinary borders. This new CDT has an extended scope in this regard, focusing on both the social and technical aspects of cyber security, and we look forward to working with researchers across Royal Holloway to supervise projects within its remit.”

Minister of State for Universities, Research, Science and Innovation,, Chris Skidmore, said: “As we explore new research to boost our economy with an increase of over £7 billion invested in R&D over five years to 2021/22 – the highest increase for over 40 years – we will need skilled people to turn ideas into inventions that can have a positive impact on our daily lives.

“The Centres for Doctoral Training at universities across the country will offer the next generation of PhD students the ability to get ahead of the curve. In addition, this has resulted in nearly £400 million being leveraged from industry partners. This is our modern Industrial Strategy in action, ensuring all corners of the UK thrive with the skills they need for the jobs of tomorrow.

“As Science Minister, I’m delighted we’re making this massive investment in postgraduate students as part of our increased investment in R&D.”

Professor Sir Mark Walport, Chief Executive of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), ,said: “Highly talented people are required to tackle key global challenges such as sustainable energy and cyber security, and provide leadership across industries and our public services.

“Centres for Doctoral Training provide them with the support, tools and training they need to succeed, and the involvement of 1,400 project partners underlines how much industry and the charity sector value this approach.”

Professor Sir Ian Diamond, Overall Chair of the CDT panels, said: “The high number and outstanding quality of CDT proposals put forward demonstrated just how successful the model has been in energizing the research community and their partners. It also made the process a difficult but heartening task. I would like to congratulate all those who were successful in being funded and look forward to hearing of the research that will emanate from the centres.” 

The importance of developing STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) skills is a key part of the Government’s Industrial Strategy, ensuring that all areas of the UK embrace innovation and build the skills the economy needs to thrive.

Professor Lynn Gladden, EPSRC’s Executive Chair, said: “The UK’s research base makes the discoveries that lead to innovations and these can improve lives and generate income for the UK. Centres for Doctoral Training have already proven to be successful in attracting the world’s brightest minds and industry support to address the scientific and engineering challenges we face. This new cadre will continue to build on previous investment.”

The training and research components of Royal Holloway’s CDT involve significant engagement from the wider cyber security sector.

These external relationships should be further strengthened by the development of Royal Holloway's new cyber security and big data innovation centre.                                                      

Click here for further details or how to apply to the CDT.

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