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Friends of the Hellenic Institute: Newsletter 2012-2013

Letter from the Director

 

 30th March 2013

 

Dear Friend,

            This year we are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the establishment of the Hellenic Institute in our College. This gives us the opportunity to reflect on the past, the present and, more importantly, the future.

The Institute was founded in September 1993 by the late Professor Andreas Papadakis, Professor Francis Robinson, then Head of the History Department, and Professor Chris Carey, then Head of Classics at Royal Holloway and subsequently Head of the Department of Greek and Latin at UCL. The first five years of the Institute were the formative years, when the foundations were laid, especially through the establishment of the MA in Hellenic Studies (shared between the Departments of History and Classics), at that time the only MA programme in a British University devoted to the diachronic and interdisciplinary study of Hellenism.

With the departure of Professor Papadakis in 1998, Julian Chrysostomides was invited to assume the directorship of the Institute in a climate of uncertainty about its future. The general feeling was that the omens were not good. In the words of a senior colleague, the Institute ‘was on its death bed’. Convinced that the study of Greek language, history, thought and culture offers an essential element in our education, despite her retirement in 1993, and her galloping age, Julian accepted the invitation, without remuneration, on condition that the College would support the Institute by expanding its teaching activities. The College agreed, provided that external funding could be secured.

The first step in this direction was the re-establishment of the post in Byzantine History, interrupted after Julian’s retirement. As we all know, the study of Byzantium is a sine qua non for the understanding of the continuity of Hellenism. Through the generosity of the Greek Ministry of Culture half of the salary for the Byzantine post was immediately secured and with the support of the College it was soon re-established. The post was filled by Dr Jonathan Harris, then Lecturer and currently Professor in Byzantine History. The next priority was the establishment of a Lectureship in Byzantine Literature and Greek Palaeography, essential for the in-depth study of Byzantine culture. Thanks to a major ten-year grant from The A.G. Leventis Foundation and the generous contribution of The Hellenic Foundation during the first five years, the post was established in November 2004.

In the years that followed, despite some difficult periods, under Julian’s inspiring leadership and perseverance and the support of our Friends, the Institute succeeded in establishing itself as a research centre, conducting research projects, publishing volumes, organising Lectures, Seminars, student exchange programmes, international Colloquia and other events addressed to scholars, students and the educated public. The securing of external funding for a considerable number of studentships, bursaries and other awards was essential for its further development. The establishment of the Friends of the Hellenic Institute in 1999 was decisive in this respect.

During the two decades of its life the Institute has expanded its teaching, research and other activities, covering aspects of Greek language, history and culture from the Homeric, Classical and Hellenistic age, through Late Antiquity to the Byzantine period and, to a certain extent, Post-Byzantine and Modern Hellenism. It is this last area that we consider our next priority. In this context our new Honorary member, Professor Richard Clogg, gave the Twelfth Annual Hellenic Lecture on “Xeniteia: the Greek diaspora in modern times” on 14 March 2013. An eminent historian of Modern Greece, Professor Clogg is advising us and supporting our efforts in establishing a Lectureship in Modern Greek History placing emphasis on Anglo-Hellenic Relations (19th-20th c.), an important area for Britain, Greece and Cyprus. With the support of the Greek Ministry of Culture substantial funds have been secured for this purpose and I hope that we shall be able to raise the remaining funds so that we can proceed with the advertisement of this post as soon as possible. At the same time we shall continue our efforts to secure funds for the establishment of a Lectureship in Greek Maritime History, covering in particular the 18th, 19th and 20th century. This is what Julian Chrysostomides tried to achieve and this we shall try to accomplish, with your help.

More than four years have passed since Julian’s death (†18.III.2008). To celebrate her life and achievements a memorial Lecture on “Byzantine Scholars and the Union of the Churches” by Professor Costas Constantinides (18.X.2011) and an International Colloquium on “George of Cyprus and his World” (18.X.2012), were held at The Hellenic Centre in London. The latter event was dedicated also to the memory of Constantine Leventis (1938-2002), former Chairman of The A.G. Leventis Foundation, Honorary Fellow and patron of Hellenic Studies in our College. Julian’s memory has been honoured also through the publication by Ashgate of a volume with a collection of her articles on Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453, co-edited by Michael Heslop and the undersigned. We would like to thank all students, colleagues and Friends who purchased copies of this memorial volume, the royalties of which are being donated towards the “Julian Chrysostomides Memorial Bursaries” established by the Friends of the Hellenic Institute.

Julian’s principles and academic values remain an unfailing source of inspiration, especially in an age where knowledge is closely associated with material wealth and universities have been transformed into businesses which primarily serve short- and middle-term commercial ends at the expense of their true purpose – the pursuit of knowledge and understanding, and transmitting these to the next generations. In the process universities have been radically altering their character, with the danger of losing their very soul. Julian never ceased defending the highest principles and values of the British academic system, from which she herself had benefitted the utmost, as she always declared. We hope that in the months and years to come British universities will seriously reconsider their position, especially in the face of the current crisis, moral, social and economic, brought about, to a large extent we believe, by successive government policies on public higher education.

Please allow me to update you with certain developments that have taken place in the College and our Institute since my last communication with you. The process of consultation concerning Faculty and Academic Unit Restructuring announced by the College Administration in June 2010, including proposals for the merging of the Departments of History and Classics, has now been completed. As a result of the strong support offered by the national and international academic community to the Classics Department in view of the proposed changes, including the gradual reduction of MA programmes as well as student and staff numbers, the College has withdrawn the proposal for the abrogation of the MA in Classics and has re-considered the restructuring of teaching and research posts in such a way that it is no longer necessary to reduce the number of staff in the Department of Classics as initially proposed by the College Administration. The proposal for the merging of the Departments of Classics and History to form a School was also withdrawn as it was felt that it was not the right time for this. As a result of these developments there were no major changes affecting the two Departments and our Institute, and therefore we continue our close co-operation with both Classics and History as before.

Following the appointment of the Vice-Principal for Research Professor Adam Tickell as Pro-Vice-Chancellor at the University of Birmingham in January 2011, the post of Chairman of the Hellenic Institute’s Steering Group was temporarily covered by Professor Philip Beasley until April 2012, when Professor Paul Hogg was appointed Vice-Principal for Research and assumed (ex-officio) the Chairmanship of our Institute’s Steering Group. In addition, Professor Geoff Ward, Vice-Principal for Students and Staff and member of our Steering Group, has been appointed Principal of Homerton College, Cambridge, and will be taking up his new position later in the year.

There have been developments also in the administrative structure of Departments and Faculties in the College. The Faculty of Arts has merged with that of History and Social Sciences. Following the appointment of the Dean of History and Social Science, Professor Rosemary Deem, as Vice Principal for Education, the new Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, under which the Departments of History and Classics are now placed, is headed by Professor Katie Normington. Finally, Professor Anne Sheppard was succeeded by Professor Ahuvia Kahane as Head of the Classics Department and (ex-officio) member of our Steering Group.

May I take the opportunity to express my deepest thanks to the aforementioned colleagues who have been offering us their support over the years. To them and our new Chairman, Professor Paul Hogg, we wish every success in their new posts. May I also express our profound gratitude to Sir Andrew Burns, former Chairman of the College Council, for his invaluable advice and immense support, which proved instrumental in the preservation and further development of our Institute in a critical phase of its life.

During the last two years, together with the arrival of new members at our Institute we also suffered loss with the passing away of Koula Lemos (26.IX.1932-25.VIII.2011) and David Bennett (21.III.1940-12.X.2012), both loyal Friends and supporters of our Institute. They will be remembered with deep affection, respect and admiration for their generosity, gentleness and humanity, and, above all, for their love for Hellenism.

The Games of the XXXth Olympiad in London last summer reminded the world of its debt to Hellenism, its principles and ideals. In the Eleventh Annual Hellenic Lecture on “The Olympic Games and the Olympic Truce in the Modern World”, held in College on 5 March 2012, Mr Stavros Lambrinidis reflected on those elements of the Greek psyche that found expression in the Olympic ideals and the Olympic Truce, in the process of ‘realising beauty and virtue, thus lifting life onto a higher intellectual and moral level, far above the depth of a superficial and materialistic existence’. He also explained, through his personal experience as a diplomat and politician, how these ideals can be realistically implemented in our modern world in pursuit of peace and understanding among groups, peoples and nations.

The Olympic Games coincided with the celebrations of the Diamond Jubilee marking the 60th anniversary of H.M. Queen Elisabeth II’s accession to the throne of the United Kingdom. On this special occasion, the Hellenic Institute has produced, in collaboration with the British Library, an electronic edition of the unpublished Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I, composed in Greek by George Etheridge, Regius Professor of Greek, on the occasion of Elizabeth’s visit to Oxford in 1566. The online annotated edition and translation of this text, which highlights the Royal patronage of Greek Studies in Tudor England, is dedicated to H.M. Queen Elizabeth II as a token of profound respect and gratitude for her long and devoted service to the nation and her contribution to Anglo-Hellenic relations.

Nothing would have been achieved all these years without the support of our College, the Chairmen and Members of our Steering Group, our Friends and sponsors, notably the Greek Ministries of Education and Culture, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, The A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, The Archdiocese of Thyateira and Great Britain, the Orthodox Cultural Association of Athens, and private donors, as well as our external collaborators, especially the Lambeth Palace Library and the British Library – above all our students and academic staff.

On behalf of the Hellenic Institute I would like to express my deepest thanks to them and you personally for all the support and encouragement we have been receiving, which gives us strength in our efforts to pass on the knowledge and love for Hellenism to the next generation of students and future scholars. This has been, and remains, our ultimate aim and destination.

At the dawn of the third decade of our journey we are reminded of the words of our great Greek poet Constantine Kavafy (1863-1933), whose 150th birth anniversary we shall be celebrating in a month’s time:

Πάντα στὸ νοῦ σου νά ῾χεις τὴν Ἰθάκη.

Τὸ φθάσιμον ἐκεῖ εἶν᾿ ὁ προορισμός σου.

Keep Ithaka always in your mind.

Arriving there is what you are destined for.

 

With warmest wishes for a Peaceful and Happy Easter,

 

Charalambos Dendrinos

 

About the Hellenic Institute

Established in 1993, The Hellenic Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, is a research centre of the History Department maintaining links with the Department of Classics and the Department of Drama & Theatre. It brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royal Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, and Byzantine Studies. It aims to consolidate these strengths and to extend them by promoting further the study of Hellenic tradition across the centuries, from the archaic and classical Greece, through the Hellenistic times, Byzantium and the Post-Byzantine period, to the modern world. The Hellenic Institute hosts a number of research projects and organises seminars, lectures and conferences addressed to students, scholars and to a wider public.

The Hellenic Institute also seeks to bring together at a national and international level all those who share its interests. It collaborates closely with other institutions in the University of London and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London. It maintains links with Universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus.

As part of its teaching activities The Hellenic Institute runs the taught MA degree course in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and the MA History: Hellenic Studies. The Institute also offers supervision to research students. Tutorials, formal and informal courses in Modern Greek Language and Culture are also offered by Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, seconded by the Greek Ministry of Education.

In 1999 The Friends of the Hellenic Institute were established with the aim to provide funding for The Nikolaos Oikonomides Studentship, to enable gifted students to pursue postgraduate studies in Byzantine History and Literature at the Institute. Since then the Friends have been supporting the Institute through fundraising and establishing a number of bursaries and prizes.

The Hellenic Institute is currently receiving funding and support from the College, the Greek Ministry of Culture, the Greek Ministry of Education (through the secondment of a philologist), the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, The A.G. Leventis Foundation, The Hellenic Foundation, the London Hellenic Society, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), the Friends of the Hellenic Institute, and private donors.

For updated information on the Institute’s activities, including forthcoming events please visit: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/hellenic-institute/

Students’ news

The following students are currently conducting MPhil/PhD research in Hellenic subjects at the Departments of History, Classics, and Drama & Theatre:

  • Sofia Alagkiozidou (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Reception of Trachiniae
  • Antiopi Argyriou-Casmeridis (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Aretē in Hellenistic inscriptions
  • Maria Argyrou (PhD, History), The printed Greek book production and trade in the eastern Mediterranean in the sixteenth century: the case of the editio princeps of St Basil’s Συγγράμματά τινα. Opera quaedam beati Basilii Caesariensis episcopi by Stefano de Sabio (Venice, 1535)
  • Katie Billotte (PhD, Classics), Latin American adaptations of Greek tragedy, 1989-2011
  • Carolyn Bowyer (MPhil/PhD, Classics) Greek Trumpets
  • Matt Cawson (PhD, Drama & Theatre), Mask and self in Western theatre (including Bacchae and Greek ideas of the self)
  • Andriana Domouzi (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Fragments of Euripides
  • Daniel Goad (MPhil/PhD, Classics) Performance reception of Aristophanes
  • Mark Guscin (PhD, History), The Tradition of the Image of Edessa
  • Christopher Hobbs (MPhil/PhD, History), A Study of the Historia Byzantina of Doukas
  • Edward Humphreys (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Epictetus on Anger
  • Eleni Katsae (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Daimones in Homer
  • Stavroula Kiritsi (PhD, Classics), Characters in Menander
  • Michael Konstantinou-Rizos (MPhil/PhD, History), The transmission of Latin philosophical and theological writings in Late Byzantium: Prochoros Cydones’ Greek translations of Thomas Aquinas’ Quaestiones disputatae de potentia and Quaestiones disputatae de spiritualibus creaturis, and their manuscript background
  • Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (MPhil/PhD, History), The Orthodox Church in Late Frankish and Venetian-Ruled Cyprus (ca. 1350 – 1571): Society, Spirituality and Identity
  • Photis Loizou (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Philotimia in Classical and Hellenistic Greece
  • Peter Long (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Guarantors in Classical and Hellenistic city-state
  • Jarrid Looney (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Euripides’ Hippolytus: a Production History
  • Beverley Lunn (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Aristotle and Screenwriting  
  • Brian McLaughlin (PhD, History), An annotated translation of Emperor John VI Kantakouzenos, History, Book III
  • Alexandra Melita (PhD, History), Magic and healing and the Greeks in seventeenth-century Venice
  • Andria Michael (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Reception of tragedy in modern Greece
  • Nil Palabiyik (PhD, History), The first Greek Press of Constantinople
  • Christina Pouros (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Mythological murderous women in Greek and Roman drama and poetry: consequences and punishments
  • Kostas Prapoglou (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Late Roman residences in Thessalonica
  • David Preston (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Philosophy and comedy in 4th century BC
  • Judith Rice (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Plato and Memory 
  • Peggy Shannon (PhD, Drama & Theatre), Women and War in ancient Greek Theatre
  • George Siderountios (PhD, History), Historical Early Christianity and its perceptions of Hellēnes (thesis submitted in March 2013)
  • Stephen Smith (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Greek architectural forms in Republican Rome
  • Panayiotis Tofis (MPhil/PhD, History), Copying activity in Thessalonike in the Palaeologan period (1246-1430)
  • Fotios Vasileiou (MPhil/PhD, History), British influence on Greek educational thought in the early nineteenth century
  • Mark Whelan (MPhil/PhD, History), Outside expertise in the Turkish wars of the kings of Hungary, 1396-1460
  • Jenny Winter (MPhil/PhD, Classics) Speeches in Xenophon
  • Andrea Zerbini (MPhil/PhD, Classics), Production and trade in marginal lands: a study of the Levantine agricultural economy in Late Antiquity
  • Magdalena Zira (MPhil/PhD, Drama & Theatre) Approaches to the Chorus in Greek Theatre Performance: Community and Ritual

The following students have successfully defended their PhD theses in March 2013:

  • Christina Kakkoura (History), An annotated critical edition of Emperor Manuel II Palaeologus’ Seven Ethico-political Orations
  • Vasos Pasiourtides (History), An annotated critical edition of Demetrios Chrysoloras’ Dialogue on Demetrios Kydones’ Antirrhetic against Neilos Kabasilas

Congratulations to the following students who were awarded the PhD degree by the University of London in 2011/12:

  • Konstantinos Palaiologos (History), An annotated critical edition of the Refutation of the Errors of the Latins by Matthaios Blastares
  • Mike Carr (History), Motivations and Response to Crusades in the Aegean, 1302-1348
  • Kenneth Scot Parker (History),The Indigenous Christians of the Arabic Middle East in an Age of Crusaders, Mongols, and Mamlūks (1244-1366)

Olivia Brackley, Christopher Hobbs, Michael Konstantinou-Rizos, Chrysovalantis Kyriacou, Efstathios Lianos-Liantis, Aris Magoutis, Connor Osborne, Elias Petrou, Ourania Vachlioti, James Wills and Athina Xoura successfully completed the MA degree in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies in 2011/12. Toby Bromige and Christopher Budleigh are currently attending this programme and Elliot Mason has joined the MA History: Hellenic Studies programme this year (2012/13).

Studentships and bursaries awarded to students (2011/12-2012/13)

H.A.H. The Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomaios I   Studentship in Byzantine Studies:

2011/12: Mark Guskin (£1,866) and Brian McLaughlin (£1,866)

2012/13: Mark Guskin (£1,914) and Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (£3,828)

The Nikolaos Oikonomides Studentship in Byzantine Studies:

2011/12: Nil Pektas (née Palabiyik) (£3,732)

2012/13: Brian McLaughlin (£1,914) and Nil Pektas (née Palabiyik) (£3,828)

The Panagiotis and Eleni Xenou Postgraduate Studentship in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies:

2012/13: Michael Konstantinou-Rizos (£3,828)

The Joan M. Hussey Memorial Prize in Byzantine Studies:

2011/12: Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (£500)

The George of Cyprus Bursaries:

2011/12: Christina Pouros (£1,866) towards tuition fees

2012/13: Elliot Mason (£1,000) and Toby Bromige (£1,000) towards maintenance expenses; and Fotios Vassileiou (£1,000) towards tuition fees

The Julian Chrysostomides Memorial Bursaries in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies:

2011/12: Helen Moore (£1,866) towards tuition fees

2012/13: Elliot Mason (£500) and Toby Bromige(£500) towards tuition fees

The Pat Macklin Memorial Bursaries in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies:

2011/12: Fotios Vasileiou (£126) towards tuition fees

Grants awarded to students by the College and other institutions (2011-2013):

  • Christopher Hobbs, RHUL Crossland Studentship and fee waiver (2011/12-2012/13)
  • Michael Konstantinou-Rizos (€6,000) Grant from the Foundation for Education and European Culture, Athens, towards maintenance expenses (2012/13)
  • Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (€6,000) Grant from the Holy Church of Panagia Phaneromeni, Nicosia, towards maintenance expenses (2012/13)
  • Nil Pektas (née Palabiyik) (£6,000) College Maintenance Scholarship for overseas students (2011/12-2012/13); Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Summer School in Greek Language and Culture Scholarship (Thessalonike, August 2011 and August 2012)
  • Mark Whelan, RHUL College Research Scholarship (2010-2013); Dorothy Dunnett History Prize (2011 and 2012); RHUL Caroline Barron Prize (2010). Romanian Academy of Sciences (2010, 2011); Erasmus Grant, Freie Universität, Berlin (September 2012-April 2013); Graduiertenstipendium, Preußischer Kulturbesitz (November-December 2012); Geheimes Staatsarchiv, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin; RHUL Helen Cam Award (October 2012); Haus, Hof und Staatsarchiv, and the Deutschordens Zentralarchiv, Vienna; Research Scholarship, Deutsche Akademischer Austauschdienst (August 2012); Stadtarchiv Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main; RHUL Postgraduate Expenses Award (February 2013); for research in the Vatican Secret Archives, Rome.

Grants and donations to the Institute (2011-2013)

  • £60,000 from The A.G. Leventis Foundation in support of the full-time Lectureship in Byzantine Literature and Greek Palaeography
  • £121,000 from The A.G. Leventis Foundation towards the Lambeth Palace Library Greek Manuscripts Cataloguing Project
  • US$14,186 from Mrs Angeliki Frangou towards The Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomaios I Studentship in Byzantine Studies, established by the Orthodox Cultural Association
  • £5,910 from the Ministry of Education and Culture of Cyprus in support of the Institute’s activities for the academic years 2010/11-2012/13
  • £4,000 from Friends and donors towards The Nikolaos Oikonomides Studentship in Byzantine Studies, The Julian Chrysostomides Memorial Bursaries Fund and The Pat Macklin Memorial Bursaries Fund
  • £1,000 from the A.G. Leventis Foundation towards the organising of the International Colloquium George of Cyprus and his World in memory of Constantine Leventis and Julian Chrysostomides (18 October 2012)
  • £500 from Mr and Mrs Nicholas Egon towards the aforementoned memorial Colloquium
  • £500 from the History Department towards the aforementoned memorial Colloquium
  • £300 from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences towards the aforementoned memorial Colloquium
  • £500 from the Institute of Classical Studies (ICS) towards the organising of the 2012 ICS Byzantine ColloquiumWhen East met West: the Reception of Latin Philosophical and Theological Thought in Late Byzantium (11-12 June 2012)
  • £1,000 from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Research Initiative Funds towards the electronic edition of the British Library Royal Manuscript Project
  • £500 from Professor Annaclara Cataldi Palau towards the above research Project
  • £450 from the royalties of the sale of the volume by †Julian Chrysostomides, Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453, eds M. Heslop and Ch. Dendrinos, Variorum Collected Studies Series (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, VT, 2011)
  • Secondment by the Greek Ministry of Education of Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, instructor of Modern Greek at The Hellenic Institute and Classics Department

News & Events

Visiting scholars: Professor Costas Constantinides (University of Ioannina) visited the Institute in October 2011 and October 2012 to give memorial lectures on the occasion of the third and fourth anniversaries of Julian Chrysostomides’ passing away, and to conduct research in Byzantine History and Greek Palaeography. Dr Andreas Meitanis (Zurich International School) visited the Institute in June 2011, and June and October 2012 to conduct research in Byzantine Literature and Greek Palaeography. The hieromonk Dr Chrysostomos Koutloumousianos visited the Institute from Mount Athos in June 2012 and January 2013 to conduct research in Celtic and Orthodox Theology and Spirituality. Dr John Demetracopoulos visited the Institute in June 2012 to give the keynote lecture in the 2012 ICS Byzantine Colloquium co-organised by the Hellenic Institute and to conduct research in Byzantine philosophical texts.

New Honorary Member

Professor Richard Clogg is an eminent British historian of modern Greece. He read History at the University of Edinburgh and subsequently spent an academic year at the British School at Athens where he conducted research on various aspects of the modern history of the Greek world. Subsequently, he was appointed Research Fellow of the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland (1967-69) and Lecturer in Modern European History at the University of Edinburgh (1968-69). In 1969 he was appointed to a lectureship in Modern Greek History in the University of London, shared between King’s College and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies. In 1983 he was appointed Reader in Modern Greek History and in 1992 Professor of Modern Balkan History. He held an Associate Fellowship (1990-95) and subsequently a Senior Research Fellowship at St Antony’s College, Oxford. In 2005, he was elected an Emeritus Fellow.

Professor Clogg is the author of numerous monographs and articles on post-Byzantine Greek and Balkan history. Among his major works are A Concise History of Greece (Cambridge University Press 1992; 2nd edn. 2002; 3rd edn. 2013). This was awarded the Runciman Prize for the best book on a Greek topic published in the UK in 1992. It has been translated into twelve languages and is currently used as a textbook in Greek universities. Other publications include Politics and the Academy: Arnold Toynbee and the Koraes Chair (Frank Cass 1986); Parties and Elections in Greece: the Search for Legitimacy (Hurst 1987); The Movement for Greek Independence 1770-1821: a Collection of Documents (Macmillan 1976); Anatolica: Studies in the Greek East in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Variorum 1996); Anglo-Greek Attitudes: Studies in History (Macmillan 2000); and Greece 1940-1949: Occupation, Resistance, Civil War: A Documentary History (Palgrave 2002).

During his career Professor Clogg has supervised many students of the modern history of Greece, a number of whom hold teaching and research posts in universities and research centres. In recognition of his major contribution to Hellenic Studies, Professor Clogg was awarded the Gold Cross of the Legion of Honour by the President of Hellenic Republic in 2002.

As Visiting Professor in Modern Greek History Professor Clogg will continue to support our efforts to promote Modern Greek Studies in our College.

Events (June 2011 to present)

13 June 2011: The John Penrose Barron Annual Memorial Lecture “Athletics and Politics in the Ancient Greek Games” by Dr Panos Valavanis, Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens was held at Beveridge Hall, Senate House, University of London. Organised by the Institute of Classical Studies (ICS) in association with The Embassy of Greece and sponsored by the Greek Archaeological Committee (UK), the lecture was well attended. Among the distinguishd guests H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain, H.E. The Ambassador of Greece Mr Aristidis Sandis and Mrs Sandis, Professor Caroline Barron, Mr and Mrs Nicholas Egon, the ICS Acting Director, Professor John North, the ICS Deputy Director and Administrator Dr Olga Krzyszkowska, and over two hundred students and members of staff from Colleges of the University of London and other Universities in Britain and abroad. The Hellenic Institute was represented by its Director.

30 June 2011: the College received Mr Anastasios P. Leventis, Chairman of The A.G. Leventis Foundation. In a lunch held in honour of Mr Leventis in the Large Board Room, the Principal, Professor Paul Layzell, expressed deep thanks on behalf of the College for the continued generous support The A.G. Leventis Foundation, Mrs Edmée Leventis and Mr Leventis personally have been offering to the College and the Hellenic Institute in particular. In his response Mr Leventis expressed his appreciation for the College’s and Hellenic Institute’s work in promoting Hellenic Studies and reassured the Principal that The A.G. Leventis Foundation will continue offering its moral and financial support in the future. In his closing thanking speech the Director remarked on the immense contribution of The A.G. Leventis Foundation in promoting Hellenic Studies in particular, and education and culture in general, in this country and all over the world during the thirty years of its life. The volume recording the Foundation’s achievements in its third decade is dedicated to the late Constantine Leventis, a patron of Hellenic Studies at Royal Holloway, and to other eminent Hellenists, who had passed away before this volume was published. Among them, Julian Chrysostomides. Apart from their unassuming, kind and gentle natrure, their modesty and integrity, their culture and great generosity, Julian and Constantine, or Dinos as he was known among his family and friends, shared the same vision. They both strongly believed that knowledge and education, if pursued with selflessness, dedication and compassion, could act as a remedy for the wrongs and evils of this world. And they pursued this throughout their life, by word and deed. “It is this legacy”, Dr Dendrinos concluded, “that they handed to us, and it is for us to hand it to the next generation”. The lunch, held in the Large Boardroom of Founder’s Building and co-organised by the Hellenic Institute and the College Events Manager, Mrs Marta Baker, was attended by the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Professor Katie Normington, the members of the Hellenic Institute’s Steering Group Dr Sarah Ansari, Professor Anne Sheppard, Professor Francis Robinson, and Mr Michael Heslop, and members, Friends and collaborators of the Institute including Dr Giles Mondelbrotte and Mrs Clare Brown, Librarian and Archivist, and Assistant Archivist, respectively, of Lambeth Palace Library, Professor Richard Clogg, Dr Peter Dewey, Professor David Cesarani, Director of Research at the History Department, Mrs Janice Cullen, Research and Business Development Manager, Dr Christos Kremmydas, Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, Dr Christopher Wright, Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos and Mr Vasos Pasiourtides.

5 July 2011: an illustrated lecture on “Cyprus and the Sinai Icons” by Professor Robin Cormack was delivered at The Hellenic Centre, Great Hall, 16-18 Paddington Street, Marylebone, London. The lecture was sponsored by the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies (SPBS) and co-organised by Mr Michael Heslop in his capacity as SPBS Chairman of the Membership Commitee.

25 May-29 July 2011: the Director represented the Hellenic Institute at the opening of the Exhibition “’Out of the Original Sacred Tongues’: The Bible and Translation” held in the Great Hall of Lambeth Palace to celebrate 400 years of the King James Bible. This exhibition set in historical context the translation of the sacred texts of the Bible into the languages of everyday life. On display was a wide range of important manuscripts and books offering a glimpse into the practical processes involved, as well as the motives behind these great achievements. At the centre of the exhibition was the 1611 edition of the King James Version, set in the context of the scholarship which created it. Other highlights of the exhibition include: Medieval English Bible translations and documents relating to their suppression; the landmark editions which drew on the new textual scholarship of the Renaissance and Reformation, including the first edition of Erasmus’ New Testament in Greek (1516); early printed vernacular translations in various languages including the first edition of Martin Luther’s German Bible; the first complete Bible in Icelandic; translations intended for missions, such as Gospel editions in Maori and Mohawk; documents showing the drive towards modern English translations for the twentieth century; and last but not least Byzantine Greek Gospel Books together with manuscripts with collations of the text by nineteenth-century British scholars who were preparing a critical edition of the Greek New Testament. In the reception that followed the welcoming speech of the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams, the Director expressed his deep thanks to His Grace for supporting the Institute’s work in cataloguing and studying the Greek Manuscript Collection of the Archiepiscopal Library.

25 August 2011: it is with profound sadness that the Institute was informed of the passing away of Koula Lemos (26.IX.1932-25.VIII.2011), a generous philanthropist, distinguished member of the Greek Community in London and a loyal Friend and supporter of the Hellenic Institute. Born in a maritime family in Chios, she received her early education there before she moved first to Athens, where she studied Law at the University of Athens, and afterwards, on her marriage in 1954, to London. In the next six decades she would devote herself to her family and her educational and charitable work. A founding member of the London branch of the Lyceum of Greek Women in the late 1970s, which she subsequently served as President (1982-1989), she was actively involved in the Cyprus Relief Fund in support of Cypriot children in need, following the 1974 invasion, and in the parish school of St Andrew and the St Nicholas Educational Trust. Koula Lemos’ presence and contribution was felt particularly through her close involvement in The Hellenic Centre in London. Since the inception and establishment of the Centre in 1994, her invaluable organising skills and indefatiguable fundraising efforts contributed decisively in its success. For seventeen years she offered her services, also as Chairman and Vice-Chairman of its Executive Board. She was particularly pleased when, in 2011, the Centre received an award by the Academy of Athens. In recognition of her own major contribution to Hellenism Koula Lemos was awarded the Order of Beneficence by the Hellenic Republic. Her passing away, in her beloved Chios, caused all of her numerous friends a sense of great loss of a brilliant and inspiring Hellenis. She will be remembered for her great kindness and generosity, her modesty and sensitivity, her dynamism and perseverance, her idealism and practical wisdom. Among Greek academics, Koula Lemos valued highly her friendship with the late Julian Chrysostomides. Indeed, she had been a pillar of support to Julian and the Hellenic Institute, especially in difficult times. This Julian never forgot. The Funeral Service was performed at the Metropolitan Church of Chios on 28 August 2011 and a Memorial Service, officiated by H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain, was held at the Greek Cathedral of St Sophia in London on 9 October 2011. Both services were attended by numerous friends. The family expressed the wish for Donations in memory of Koula Lemos to be made either to the Macular Disease Society (www.maculardisease.org) or to The Hellenic Centre, 16-18 Paddington Street, London W1U 5AS. Koula Lemos will be remembered with deep affection, respect and admiration.

8-9 July 2011: an Interdisciplinary International Workshop and Conference on “The Crusades, Islam and Byzantium” was held at the German Historical Institute, London. Students in the latter stages of their PhD and young scholars from across these three subject areas gathered to generate scholarly contacts and to give an insight into the workings and approaches of these fields. The event also provided participants with an opportunity to have their work analysed by contemporaries and a panel of distinguished commentators. The format of the event was different to many conferences with a requirement that those giving papers had to submit their work in advance in order that all attendees could study it. Thus the papers were not read out in their entirety, but each was assigned to another member of the workshop whose task was to make a detailed response to it (thus everyone had two roles in the event, as speaker and, in a different session, as a respondent). Each speaker was permitted to make a reply to the comments on their paper before the floor was open to questions. This provided a far more rigorous environment than the 20 minute presentations commonly experienced at international conferences. Twenty speakers from six countries (UK, USA, Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Spain) took part. Academics from the UK, Germany, Denmark and the USA acted as convenors for each session. In addition, we heard three plenary speakers, one on each of our themes: Professor Thomas Madden (St Louis, USA) on the Crusades, Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburgh) on Islam, and Professor Jonathan Harris (RHUL) on Byzantium. Speakers included Danielle Park (RHUL): Behold here are two swords – is it enough? Defending those left behind: The co-operation of papal and secular crusade protection in practice, Daniel Franke (Rochester): England and the Jerusalem crusade in the fourteenth century: The enigma of Edward III, Jonathan Rubin (Jerusalem): Benoit d’Alignan and Thomas Agni: Two Frankish intellectuals and their activities vis-à-vis oriental Christianity in 13th-century Acre, Scott Parker (RHUL): The indigenous Christians of the Near East and the crusade of Alexandria, 1365, Timo Kirschberger (Göttingen): Of Maccabees and Trojans in the Crusader States: Ralph of Caen and Fulcher of Chartres as chroniclers and propagators of ethnogenesis in the Latin East, Liz Mylod (Leeds): Seeing the boy Jesus: Thirteenth-century pilgrimage in Galilee, Megan Holmes Worth (Tennessee): The politics of composition: Fulcher of Chartres’ Historia Iherosolymitana, Jilana Ordman (Chicago): The inscrutable Odo of Deuil’s instrumental attributions of emotions, Martin Vucetic (Münster): Byzantine emperors encountering foreign rulers in the time of the First to the Fourth Crusades, Cristina Stancioiu (California): Byzantium remembered and imagined: dress and authority in Venetian Crete, 14th-16th century, Barbara Packard (RHUL): Remembering the First Crusade: The impact of politics and literature, Simon John (Swansea): Godfrey of Bouillon and the Swan Knight: The emergence of mythic ancestry in the crusade cycle, Osman Latiff (RHUL): The place of Jesus. Qur’anic imagery and the double-edged sword of physical and spiritual jihad in Muslim poetry during the crusades, Uri Shachar (Chicago): Thirteenth-century Jewish narratives on pre-Messianic holy wars: The use of the Other in establishing an ideal of militant piety, Alex Mallett (RHUL): The conversion of Muslims to Christianity in the Near East, c.1097–1291, Valentin Portnykh (Novosibirsk) Humbert of Romans’ treatise about the preaching of the holy cross: The viewpoint on the perspectives of conversion of the Saracens, Georg Jostkleigrewe (Münster): Franco-Levantine relations and state formation in 14th-century France: Networks and agents, Alexander Berner (Bochum): Crusading in a regional context: The case of Cologne and the lower Rhine area, Cristian Caselli (La Rioja): Crusade against the Turks: War and propaganda in the humanistic image of Alfonso the Magnanimous, and Liya Chechik (Moscow): The actualization of the concept of the crusades and its reflection in the iconography of Venetian art of the Renaissance. The content of a number of the papers reflected a strong interest in source criticism, investigating the construction of historical narratives and the memory and memorialisation of particular events. A number of speakers and respondents grappled with ties between the three primary themes of the meeting. Thus, issues of intercultural relationships, cultural transfer and identity emerged from a variety of interdisciplinary and methodological approaches to produce further stimulating discussion. Professor Bernard Hamilton (Nottingham) gave a summary at the end of the event. A further fifteen scholars and students were present at the meeting as registered attendees and they were able to read the papers in advance as well. Co-organised by Dr Jochen Schenk (German Historical Institute), Professor Jonathan Phillips (RHUL), Dr William Purkis (Birmingham), Professor Jonathan Harris (RHUL), the Conference was funded by the German Historical Institute, RHUL, The Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, The Royal Historical Society and anonymous donors.

10-11 September 2011: the Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Ancient Literature (AMPAL) was held at RHUL Egham Campus. The theme of the conference was “Power and Manipulation”, which encompassed many different interpretations and specialisations within the field of Classics, including consideration of the power of manipulation or the manipulation of power in Greek and Roman literature, language, politics, historiography, religion, mythology, drama, philosophy, and archaeology. This two-day residential event, co-funded by the Classics Department and the Hellenic Institute, was organised by Christina Pouros, Giulia Brunetta and Katie East.

18 October 2011: a lecture on “Byzantine Scholars and the Union of the Churches” was given by Professor Costas Constantinides to commemorate the third anniversary of the passing away of Julian Chrysostomides († 18.X.2008). The lecture examined the role played and the stance taken by leading Byzantine scholars after the Union of the Churches at the Councils of Lyons (1274) and of Florence (1439), discussing their views highlighted by the dilemma between submission to Roman Catholicism and subsubsquent adulteration of their faith in the hope of financial and military assistance or accommodation with the Ottoman rule with the dogmatic identity remaining intact. Co-organised by the Hellenic Institute and The Hellenic Centre, the lecture was held at The Hellenic Centre in London, followed by a reception. More than seventy students, scholars and friends attended the event, which was a tribute to Julian’s legacy as a historian of the Palaeologan period. Among distinguished guests were the Very Revd Archimandrite Aimilianos Papadakis, representing H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain, Revd Dr Joseph A. Munitiz SJ, who gave the Vote of Thanks, Mrs Varvara Kambouridi, Educational Counsellor of the Embassy of Greece, Professor Soteroula Constantinides, Mrs Eirene harvalia-Crook, Dr Andreas Meitanis and Dr Andreas Pelendrides.

9 February 2012: the 2012 Annual Dabis Lecture, entitled “Why Pericles matters?”, was given by Dr Robin Lane Fox, Fellow and Tutor in Ancient History at New College, Oxford and University Reader in Ancient History, at RHUL Egham Campus, Windsor Building Auditorium. The lecture examined the relevance of the ideas, life and deeds of the great Athenian statesman for the modern world. Focusing on Pericles’ celebrated Funeral Oration, as related by Thucydides, which presents an idealised image of Athens and its citizens, Dr Lane Fox discussed various scholarly views on its message and value, spanning between its characterisation as a monument of political thought to an odious expression of collectivism, nationalism, militarism and totalitarianism. What this oration reflects, Dr Lane Fox argued, is its radical democratic ethos. This is a speech to addressed an assembly of citizens not by a hereditary ruler, elected leader, powerful general, a member of the social or itellectual elite, or indeed a representative of a group or the people, but by one citizen to another, on equal basis. This stresses the interlinked bond between the city and its citizens. What makes this symbiosis of the polites and the polis possible, and moreover enhances it, is paideia, through which citizens are prepared from an early age to take full part in civic and public life, and at the same time enables them to appreciate and love beauty and wisdom without sacrificing the virtues of courage and bravery. Despite its love for arts, festivals, athletic games and magnificent civic buildings, far from uniformity or private luxury Periclean Athens encouraged variety and modesty, and promoted individual freedom while at the same time cultivated equality and communal spirit. For all these reasons, Dr Lane Fox concluded, Pericles and the Athenian polis serve as a model for the modern statesman and society. The lecture, followed by a reception, was attended by a good number of students and staff from the College and other Colleges of the University of London.

5 March 2012: the Eleventh Annual Hellenic Lecture on “The Olympic Games and the Olympic Truce in the Modern World” was delivered by Mr Stavros Lambrinidis, formerly Foreign Minister of Greece, Vice-President of the European Parliament and Director-General of the International Olympic Truce Centre. With the eyes of the world fixed on the Games of the XXXth Olympiad in London, a celebration of peace and friendship among peoples and nations all over the world, Mr Lambrinidis offered us an opportunity to reflect on the values, principles and institutions that gave rise to the Olympic spirit and ideals in ancient Greece, as expressed in the Olympic Games and the Olympic Truce, and asked to what extent these could help us solve internal and external conflicts and crises the modern world is facing today. In his lecture Mr Lambrinidis drew mainly from his long experience as a politician and diplomat to show to what extent and in what way the Olympic ideals can be realistically used by political institutions and organisations in order to bring peace in the world, even sporadically, as in the case of the truce between fighting groups during the Bosnian war, which though lasted a few hours it enabled the Red Cross to distribute humanitarian aid to the bombarded population, and in other cases he witnessed as part of his official duties. The Lecture, held in the Windsor Building Auditorium and followed by a reception in the Foyer and Dinner in honour of the Speaker, was co-organised by the Hellenic Institute, Mrs Marta Baker, College Events Manager and Dr Katerina Diamantaki, Assistant to Mr Lambrinidis. Hosted by the Principal, Professor Paul Layzell, the event was attended by over eighty students, members of staff and friends of the College and the Institute. Among our distinguished guests were H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain escorted by the Revd Evangelos Nikolaos Liasis, H.E. The Ambassador of Greece in the United Kingdom Mr Aristeidis Sandis with Mrs Sandis, the Minister Counsellor (Cultural Affairs) of the Embassy of Greece, Dr Victoria Solomonides, the Press Counsellor Mr Spyros Diamiantis and the Educational Counsellor Mrs Varvara Kambouridi, Mr Anastasios P. Leventis, the Chairman and members of the Hellenic Institute’s Steering Group, Professor Philip Beesley, Professor Katie Normington, Dr Sarah Ansari, Professor Ahuvia Kahane, Mrs Edmée Leventis and Mr Michael Heslop. Other colleagues, members, Friends and supporters of the Institute who were present included Dr Giacomo Benedetto, Professor David Cesarani, Professor Richard Clogg, Mrs Janice Cullen, Ms Máire Davies, Professor Peter Dewey, Professor Helen Gilbert, Dr Helen Heslop, Mr Simon Higman, Dr Christos Kremmydas, Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos, Professor Boris Rankov, Professor Anne Sheppard, Mr Philip Taylor, Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, Miss Maria Venetidou, and Dr Christopher Wright.In the months that followed the lecture, the Olympic flame was carried through land and sea from ancient Olympia to London, spreading its warm light once more Urbi et Orbi. In this memorable event the College is proud to have actively taken part by hosting the Olympic rowing and sprint canoe teams within its grounds.

3 February-23 March 2012: the University of London Postgraduate Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts resumed its regular meetings on Fridays at The Warburg Institute, University of London, Woburn Square, London. The Seminar, convened by Dr Christopher Wright and Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos, continued its annotated edition and translation of the lengthy Correspondence of George of Cyprus (Ecumenical Patriarch Gregory II, 1283-89). Scholars and postgradute students from RHUL, King’s College, University College London and a corresponding member from the University of Patras participated in the Seminar.

17 March 2012: a one-day International Conference on “Simon of Genoa’s Medical Lexicon” was held at RHUL premises at 2 Gower Street, Bedford Square, London. It brought together a number of scholars in Britain and abroad, who explored the historical context in which the clavis sanationis came into existence; the sources, both Latin and Greek, Simon may have used to compile it; and Simon’s command of Arabic. The Proceedings will be published by Versita in a volume which will be available online. Organised by Dr Barbara Zipser and funded by RHUL History Department and the Wellcome Trust, the Conference was part of the Simon Online edition project, which is accessible at http://www.simonofgenoa.org/index.php5?title= Simon_Online

11-12 June 2012:the Institute of Classical Studies (ICS) 2012 Byzantine Colloquium, entitled “When East met West: the Reception of Latin Philosophical and theological thought in Late Byzantium”, was held in Senate House, University of London, Room G22/26. The first day Dr John Demetracopoulos (Patras) gave the keynote lecture on the “Influence of Thomas Aquinas on Late Byzantine philosophical and theological thought”, which was linked with the introductory paper by Dr Dendrinos on “Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus”, an International collaborative research project, currently co-hosted by the University of Patras and the Hellenic Institute. This project aims to contribute to the study of the reception and use of Thomas Aquinas’ theological and philosophical thought by Byzantine intellectual circles, both Latinophile and Orthodox, by producing critical editions of Greek translations of, and commentaries on, various Thomistic works composed by Byzantine scholars and theologians between the late thirteenth and fifteenth centuries. The majority of these texts remain hitherto unpublished, or partially edited, or published on the basis of a limited number of manuscripts, often lacking information on sources cited therein. Following standard modern methodology, the critical editions, prepared by doctoral students and scholars participating in this project, are based on all extant manuscripts; they comprise a short introduction on the text and the manuscript tradition, while the text is accompanied by an apparatus fontium identifying sources and an apparatus criticus recording all palaeographical and textual phenomena. An index verborum, an index locorum and facsimiles of selected folios of the extant manuscripts are also included. The editions of these texts will shed more light on the philosophical and theological dialogue between the Greek East and the Latin West in a period of intensive intellectual creativity. In this sense, the publication of these texts will become a useful tool for scholars and students of Byzantine and Western European history and thought. This project involves established and younger scholars and doctoral students based at Universities and research centres in London, Paris, Rome, Bari, Munich, Cologne, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Sofia, Athens, Thessaloniki, Patras, Corfu and New York. The remaining papers of the Colloquium focused on editions of some of these texts currently prepared by members of our Institute, including Dr Christopher Wright, who presented his on-going edition of Demetrios Kydones’ translation of Aquinas’ Summa theologiae, Prima Pars; Mr Vasos Pasiourtides, who discussed his recently completed edition of an unpublished fictitious Dialogue with Aquinas by Demetrios Chrysoloras; and Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos who examined the use of Latin theological sources in the unpublished treatise On the Error of the Latins by Matthaios Blastares. The last three speakers included the Revd. Professor Andrew Louth (Durham), who explored the reception of St Augustine in Late Byzantium, the Revd. Professor Richard Price (Heythrope College) who re-examined the citation of Latin authorities at the Council of Union in Florence (1439), and Revd Dr Christiaan Kappes (Athens and Equador), who presented his findings on the influence of John Duns Scotus on the theology of Gennadius Scholarius. The Colloquium closed with a round table discussion summarising the views of the speakers with reference to the theological dialogue between East and West in the Palaeologan period and the lessons we can learn in view of the current dialogue between the Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches. Attended by more than fifty students and scholars, both clergy and laity, from Europe and the United States, the Colloquium attracted international attention including the Vatican, who advertised its Proceedings through their official journal (l’Osservatore Romano). The annotated papers will be published in a forthcoming volume of the theological journal Nicolaus (University of Bari). Abstracts of papers are accessible online at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/Reception.html Funded by ICS the Colloquium was co-organised by Dr Christopher Wright, Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos, Dr Olga Krzyszkowska and Dr Dendrinos, with the collaboration of Dr John Demetracopoulos, Dr Andreas Meitanis and Vasos Pasiourtides.

15 June 2012: a one-day Colloquium devoted to “The Writing of Medieval History: Debates, Definitions and Approaches” was held at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), Senate House, London. Scholars of Medieval History, from MA students through to post-doctoral researchers, gave papers addressing key questions in current historical writing on Western Europe, Byzantium and the Eastern Mediterranean throughout the Middle Ages. The keynote lecture was given by Professor David Bates (University of East Anglia): “Is it possible to write a cultural biography of William the Conqueror?” This event provided a unique opportunity for researchers to contribute to some of the most pressing debates in current historiography of the Middle Ages. Each strand was inspired by an example of historical writing and explored the topic through a broad opening question. Participants acted as lead respondents, presenting a 10-minute pre-prepared response before taking part in a roundtable discussion. Strand 1 – The Early Middle Ages: To what extent are questions of literate culture relevant for historians in discussions of property in early medieval Europe? Discussing Patrick Geary, ‘Land, Language, and Memory in Europe, 700-1100’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 9 (1999), 169-84. Strand 2 – Byzantium and the Eastern Mediterranean: Did the Byzantines have their own version of Holy War? Discussing Tia Kolbaba, ‘Fighting for Christianity. Holy War in the Byzantine Empire’, Byzantion 68 (1998), 194-221. Strand 3 – High Medieval Europe: Can historians of kingship, politics and parliament in high medieval Europe learn from the work of early medievalists on ‘assembly politics’ and ‘symbolic communication’? Discussing Timothy Reuter, ‘Velle sibi fieri in forma hac: symbolic acts in the Becket dispute’, in Timothy Reuter, Medieval Polities and Modern Mentalities (Cambridge, 2006), 167-90. Strand 4 – The Crusades: To what extent does the ‘pluralist’ view of crusade history dominate historiography on the subject? Discussing Giles Constable, ‘The Historiography of the Crusades’, in The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World, eds Angeliki E. Laiou and Roy Parviz Mottahedeh (Dumbarton Oaks, 2001), 1-22. Sponsored by RHUL Hellenic Institute, the Institute of Historical Research, and the University of London, School of Advanced Study, the Conference was co-organised by Mr Simon John, Ms Sophie Ambler and Dr Mike Carr.

23 August 2012: the Director attended a farewell Dinner in honour of H.E. the Ambassador of Greece in the United Kingdom Mr Aristidis Sandis and Mrs Sandis, organised by H.E. the Archbishop Gregorios in the Archdiocese of Thyateira and Great Britain in London. Over fifty guests, representing various professions and groups among the Greek and Cypriot community, attended the Dinner. In his farewell speech His Eminence expressed His deep thanks to Mr Sandis for his contribution to the Anglo-Hellenic relations during a difficult period in Greece and Europe, and paid tribute to Mrs Sandis’ important role in indefatiguably supporting social, cultural and philanthropic causes and events, highlighting the freedom, security and respect the Greek and Cypriot community is enjoying in Britain. In his response Mr Sandis recalled the support he has been receiving throughout his ambassadorial duties in Britain, reflected on the long and close relations between our two nations and stressed the important role of the Greek Diaspora (of which Mr and Mrs Sandis themselves are members, been born in the Greek Community in Egypt), in preserving and disseminating the Hellenic spirit to the world.

12 October 2012: it is with deep sadness that the College and the Institute was informed of the passing away of David Bennett (21.III.1940-12.X.2012), a loyal Friend of the Hellenic Institute. A former doctoral student of our College, David was an expert in Xenonica, Greek medical texts associated with hospitals in the late Byzantine period. This was the theme of his Phd thesis which he conducted under the supervision of Professor Peregrine Horden and the late Julian Chrysostomides. After his graduation (2003) David maintained close ties with the History Department, the Hellenic Institute and the University of London Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts of which he was an enthusiastic member. A passionate bibliophile David was the proud owner of a large and beautiful library with rare books, most of which reflected his love for Classical Greek and Byzantine history and literature. Following an ischemic attack during holidays in Cornwall he passed away in the Royal Hospital in Truro on Friday 12th October about midnight. The funeral service took place in King Charles the Martyr Church, Royal Tunbridge Wells on 2 November 2012. Professor Horden, representing the College, gave the funeral oration reflecting on David’s character and personality, his academic life and achievements. The Institute was represented by Dr Dendrinos. The family expressed the wish for donations in memory of David to be made to RNLI c/o E.R. Hickmott & Son, 41 Grove Hill Road, Royal Tunbridge Wells TN1 1SD. David will be remembered for his warmth and gentleness, his modesty and generosity, his mischievous sense of humour and above all his love for scholarship.

18 October 2012:a one-day International Colloquium on “George of Cyprus and his World” was held in memory of Constantine Leventis (1938-2002) and Julian Chrysostomides (1928-2008) at the Great Hall of The Hellenic Centre in London. Seven speakers, both seasoned and younger scholars, covered various aspects of the life, work and personality of the distinguished Byzantine teacher, scholar and theologian George of Cyprus, later Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Gregory II (1283-9), whose lengthy Correspondence is being edited at the University of London Seminar over the last fifteen years. Revd Dr Joseph Munitiz, SJ (Oxford), co-founder of the Seminar, introduced the Colloquium reflecting on its scholarly work over the years, stressing the atmoshere of friendship and collegiality in the common effort. Professor Costas Constantinides (Ioannina) spoke about the life and career of our protagonist, following him through the extant sources in his journeys from Latin-occupied Cyprus to Ephesos and Constantinople (at the end also using the Google map!) Professor Aristeides Papadakis (Maryland) explored George of Cyprus as a theologian in the wider context of the theological dialogue on the Trinitarian doctrine between East and West. He was followed by Dr Inmaculada Pérez Martín (Madrid), a distinguished palaeographer who specialises in classical texts copied by George of Cyprus as part of his scholarly and teaching activities. The paper by Professor Sofia Kotzabassi (Thessalonike), on George’s activities as a scribe and bibliophile, was read by Dr Andreas Meitanis (Zurich) as she was unable to travel for reasons beyond her control. Dr Charalampos Chotzakoglou (Athens and Nicosia) placed George’s life and work in the broader context of art as a refection of the social, ecclesiastical and theological dialogue between the Orthodox East and the Latin West in Byzantium in general and Cyprus in particular. The work at the University of London Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts was then presented by its co-director Dr Christopher Wright, who announced the results of its editorial work so far and Philip Taylor who explained the future plans for a new electronic edition and translation of George of Cyprus’ Letters, designed to be constantly updated and freely accessible to the academic community and the public online. Finally, Dr Andreas Pelendrides (London) re-read Julian Chrysostomides’ paper entitled “George of Cyprus: Self portrait of a Scholar”. This was a moving occasion uniting the memory of the two honorands, for Julian had devoted this paper to Constantine Leventis at a Colloquium in his memory co-organised in London by the ICS and the British School at Athens to mark the second anniversary of his passing away in November 2004. Over seventy students, scholars, Friends and supporters attended the event. Among them H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain, who addressed the audience at the closing of the event, Mrs Varvara Kambouridi, Educational Councellor of the Greek Embassy in London, Mrs Edmée Leventis, Mr George Lemos and Mrs Natasha Lemos, Mrs Eirene Harvalia-Crook, Professor Soteria Constantinides, Professor Alice-Mary Talbot, Mrs Diana Maynard, Dr Fevronia Nousia, Ms Eirene Nousia, Dr Ilse De Vos, Dr Viviana Tagliaferri, Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, and other friends, former and current students, some of whom travelled from distant cities and lands to be present on this special occasion. Sponsored by The Hellenic Centre, RHUL Hellenic Institute, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences and History Department, The A.G. Leventis Foundation, Mr and Mrs Nicholas Egon, with the kind support of the Society of Cypriot Studies, and the Postgraduate Programme of Mediaeval Studies, University of Ioannina, the Colloquium was co-organised by Mrs Agathe Kalispera, Dr Maria Kalli, Ms Evangelia Roussou, Ms Christina Vagioti, Dr Christopher Wright, Mr Vasos Pasiourtides, Professor Costas Constantinides and Dr Dendrinos. The Proceedings of the Colloquium will be published in a volume on Byzantine Manuscripts, Scholars and Teachers in the Palaeologan period, currently being prepared at the Hellenic Institute. Abstracts of papers are available online at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/George-of-Cyprus.html

25 November 2012: the inauguration concert of the Symphonic Orchestra Arcadia Mundi took place in St John, Smith’s Square, London, under the auspices of the International Society for Arcadia as part of the London Festival of Bulgarian Culture. The repertoire included Prokofiev, Classical Symphony, Beethoven, Violin Concerto, the premiere of Arnaoudov’s Violin Concerto, Mozart, Symphony no. 41 ‘Jupiter’, with Ivo Stankov, violin, George Hlawiczka violin and conductor, and Anastasios Strikos conductor. The Hellenic Institute is a founding member of the International Society for Arcadia (ISA). As we know, Arcadia, more than a historical and a modern geographical region, is a name which carries a connotation which prevailed in world civilisation as a reminder of a simple and attainable happiness, intertwined with the concepts of harmony, innocence, joy of life, sensitivity, measure and return to what is essential. From Antiquity to our days, in opposition to fanaticism, lack of self-consciousness and responsibility, many distinguished personalities, based on this poetic image of Arcadia, maintained an attitude of resistance against these vices. The ISA aims to continue and broaden their efforts and example in response to the present challenges, including the conservation of natural environment, sustainable development, fair trade, humanism and man's reconciliation with himself and his environment. For this reason, in Spring 2007, a small group of people from different countries founded ISA for the study and the utilisation of the Arcadian world legacy by creating a channel worldwide between the real Arcadia and ‘Arcadia’ as a concept and ideal. The wealth linked with the name of Arcadia can form the basis for the contact and co-operation among people and institutions inspired by the Arcadian ideal for the common benefit. For further information on ISA and its activities please visit: http://www.isarcadia.org/

4 December 2012: a paper entitled “How to spend it: Wealth and its Investments in the Last Centuries of Byzantium” was delivered by Dr Dionysios Stathakopoulos, Lecturer in Byzantine History at King’s College London, at the Research Seminar of the History Department in the McRae Building. As is well known, during the Palaeologan period, though the Byzantine State was poor some of its citizens were very wealthy. In his paper Dr Stathakopoulos looked at the dialectics of expansion and retraction with reference to the Palaeologan aristocracy, and more specifically at the patterns of investment and disinvestment of rich Byzantines, especially at the convergence of charity, medicine and the cult of remembrance, in the last centuries of the Empire. In the discussion that followed the view that wealthy Byzantines were not prepared to assist with the defence of Constantinople in the face of the iminent Ottoman threat but tried to secure their own financial interests against the common good was challenged by Professor Jonathan Harris, who produced evidence that shows the opposite. Indeed, this important area needs to be explored further.

10 December 2012: the Director attended a reception to celebrate the reopening of the A. G. Leventis Gallery of Ancient Cyprus at the British Museum. The reopening marked Cyprus’ Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The A.G. Leventis Foundation was represented by Ms Louisa Leventis. In her opening speech Ms Leventis reminded that this Gallery was inaugurated by her late father, Constantine Leventis, in 1987, who had expressed the hope that this would serve Cypriots living in Britain as a link between their native island of Cyprus and their adopted British isles. This historical and symbolic dimension of the Gallery as a bridge between the two countries was also stressed by the Director of the British Museum, Dr Neil McGregor, who paid tribute to Constantine Leventis’ vision. In his closing speech, H.E. The High Commisssioner of Cyprus in the United Kingdom, Mr Alexandros Zenon, highlighted the major contribution of The A.G. Leventis Foundation in preserving and promoting Cypriot history and culture in Britain and the world, and underlined the Hellenic and European identity of Cyprus. The event was attended by H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain, Professor Irene Lemos, Professor Charlotte Roueché, Professor Paul Cartledge, Ms Agathe Kalispera, students and teachers from University of London Colleges, and members of the Greek and Cypriot Community in London, and many philhellenes.

24 January 2013: Inaugural Lecture on “Philosophy, Politics and Education: the significance of Plato’s Gorgias” by Professor Anne Sheppard, held in the Windsor Building Auditorium. In her lecture Professor Sheppard explained that she had first been interested in Plato’s Gorgias as a work of literature and a discussion of rhetoric. Over time, however, she had increasingly come to appreciate the political implications of this dialogue. She focused on the way in which philosophy and politics are contrasted in the Gorgias as well as Socrates’ harsh criticisms of the politics and politicians of classical Athens. She went on to consider the commentary on the Gorgias by Olympiodorus, an Alexandrian Neoplatonist writing in the sixth century ad. Olympiodorus defended Plato against the criticisms of the second-century sophist Aelius Aristides, accepting Plato’s criticisms of democracy and the political theory of the Republic in a way which reflects his historical circumstances. In the closing section of her lecture Professor Sheppard stressed the importance of studying philosophy, as valuable now as in the fourth century bc or the sixth century ad.

1 February-22 March 2013: the University of London Postgraduate Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts was re-convened by Dr Christopher Wright and Dr Charalambos Dendrinos, to continue preparing an annotated edition and translation of the Letters of George of Cyprus at The Warburg Institute, University of London. For further information please visit http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/research/Seminar.htm

16 February 2013: a Colloquium entitled “Greece/Precarious/ Europe: Culture and Crisis”, held at The Hellenic Centre in London, brought together academics, artists and writers, who discussed how contemporary Greek culture is transformed in the current economic and socio-political crisis, questioning established orthodoxies and hierarchies, looking for new ways of creating a Greek national/transnational imaginary and reassessing the relationship between the present and ‘the archive’, which determines the historical and cultural inheritance of Greece. Panel 1: Crisis and the Past, dicsussed by Dr Dimitris Plantzos (Athens), Dr Dimitris Papanikolaou (Oxford), and Professor Richard Alston (RHUL). Panel 2: Representations (1) chaired by Professor Roderick Beaton (King’s College London); Dr Theodoros Chiotis (Oxford) discussed Crisis and poetry, Dr Eleftheria Ioannidou (Birmingham) discussed Crisis and theatre, Dr Maria Margaronis (London correspondent for the Nation and freelance correspondent for the Guardian) discussed Crisis and Media. Panel 3: Representations (2), Dr Angela Dimitrikaki (Edinburgh), Dr Sozita Goudouna (Curator and Artistic Director of Out of the Box Intermedia) and Dr Georgios Papadopoulos (Erasmus University Rotterdam) discussed Visual Art and Crisis. The final session, by Dr Kostas Douzinas (Birkbeck College, University of London), was followed by a Round Table discussion chaired by Dr Efi Spentzou (RHUL). The event was organised jointly by The Hellenic Centre, the Subfaculty of Modern Greek, Oxford University, and RHUL Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome with the support of RHUL Humanities and Arts Research Centre. The Conference, convened by Dr Dimitris Papanikolaou, Dr Efi Spentzou and Professor Richard Alston, was attended by over a hundred delegates.

25 February 2013:the 2013 Annual Dabis Lecture, entitled “Visual Ontologies: Style, Archaism and the Construction of the Sacred in the Western Tradition”, was given by Dr Jas Elsner, Humfrey Payne Senior Research Fellow in Classical Archaeology and Art at the University of Oxford, and Professor of the History of Art at the University of Chicago. In his lecture Dr Elsner showed ways in which sacred images have been framed by other images, often in different styles, within the Western tradition in order to establish their aura. The lecture moved from ancient Greece and Rome via the middle ages in Byzantium and the West to the Counter Reformation. The lecture, held at RHUL Picture Gallery, was well attended.

6 March 2013: the RHUL Classical Society organised the “Classics Day” with various events taking place around the College Egham Campus between 11am-9pm. These included “Tales From Ovid” preview performance, talks on “Fun with Ovid in the Metamorphoses” by Dr Llewelyn Morgan (Oxford), “Homeric Epic and Rap Culture” by Professor Ahuvia Kahane (RHUL), “Plato on Poetry” by Professor Anne Sheppard (RHUL), “Greek for the Innocents” by Professor Jonathan Powell (RHUL), “Latin and Greek Poetry Recital” by David Raeburn (Oxford), “Judgement of Paris” by the Film Festival Society, as well as “Absolute Harmony performance, Charity Gladiator Battles by the Philosophy Society, informal debates” by the Debating Society, University Challenge, Comedy Society Stand-up and last but not least Karaoke!

14 March 2013:the Twelfth Annual Hellenic Lecture on Xeniteia: the Greek diaspora in modern times” was delivered by Professor Richard Clogg, Emeritus Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford and Visiting Professor in Modern Greek History at RHUL Hellenic Institute. In his lecture Professor Clogg explored the evolution of the diaspora and its relation with the Greek State and καθ’ ἡμᾶς Ἀνατολή, the Greek East. The Greeks are an archetypal diaspora people. Xeniteia, sojourning in foreign lands, has been central to the experience of the Greek people from time immemorial to the modern world. From the eighteenth century onwards emigration from the Greek lands has accelerated, reaching significant peaks between the mid-1890s and the outbreak of the First World War, and in the late 1950s and 1960s. This has led to a significant Greek presence in the United States, Australia, Canada, Western Europe and elsewhere. Towards the end of the twentieth century Greece, with growing prosperity, became a country of immigration rather than emigration. Moreover, the present economic crisis has resulted in some Greeks once again taking the path of xeniteia. In his closing remarks Professor Clogg drew attention to the fact the material recording various aspects of the diaspora of the Greek people all over the world is immense and largely unexplored, and therefore systematic research on this important area for the history of Hellenism remains an urgent desideratum. In his Vote of Thanks, Professor Francis Robinson, highlighted the contribution of the Greek diaspora in this country. In his capacity of co-founder of the Hellenic Institute, he reminded us of its establishment in the College twenty years ago, and the contribution of successive Directors, the late Andreas Papadakis and Julian Chrysostomides, and currently Dr Dendrinos, all members of the Greek diaspora. Reflecting on the early days of the Institute and its growth over the last two decades, Professor Robinson expressed the wish, on behalf of the College, friends and supporters, that it would continue its work despite the difficulties in the present financial crisis, for it is now more than ever that it needs to remind us of the value of the Hellenic spirit and tradition. The lecture, hosted by Professor Paul Hogg, Vice-Principal for Research and Enterpise, and Chairman of the Hellenic Institute’s Steering Group, was held in the Windsor Building Auditorium, followed by a reception in the Foyer and Dinner in honour of the Speaker in the Picture Gallery. The event, organised jointly by the Hellenic Institute and the College Events Manager Mrs Marta Baker and Mrs Sue Heath, was attended by over eighty students, members of staff, and friends and supporters. Among our distinguished guests were H.E. The Archbishop Gregorios of Thyateira and Great Britain escorted by the Revd Archimandrite Evangelos Nikolaos Liasis, the Minister Counsellor (Cultural Affairs) of the Embassy of Greece, Dr Victoria Solomonides, the Educational Counsellor Mrs Varvara Kambouridi, Mr George Lemos and Mrs Natasha Lemos, Dr Maria Litina, Professor Ahuvia Kahane, Mr Michael Heslop and Dr helen Heslop, Mrs Janice Cullen, Ms Máire Davies, Professor Peter Dewey, Mr Lakis Kaounides, Dr Christos Kremmydas, Professor Anne Sheppard, Ms Vaso Spanos, Mr Philip Taylor, Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, Mr Colin Wright and Mrs Maureen Wright, and Dr Christopher Wright.

21 March 2012: the College received H. E. The Ambassador of Greece to the United Kingdom Mr Konstantinos Bikas, who gave a lecture on “Geography development and cooperation in the Eastern Mediterranean” at the Main Lecture Theatre. In his lecture Mr Bikas expounded on the indisputable geopolitical importance of the area as a crossroad of peoples and civilisations through the centuries, and presented his views on current developments within the complex socio-economic, political, religious and cultural issues in the wider context of the international state of affairs dominated by the financial crisis. The lecture was followed by a discussion. Co-organised under the auspices of the RHUL Diplomatic Society and Geopolitics and Security Society, with the collaboration of Professor David Gilbert, Dr Peter Adey and Mr Petros Kapsaskis. The lecture was attended by Dr Evdokia Fournatzopoulou, Expert Counsellor at the Embassy of Greece, students and staff from the Departments of Geography, Economics, and Politics & International Relations, and other colleagues including Professor Ahuvia Kahane, Dr Sarah Ansari and Dr Dendrinos.

26 March 2013: at the invitation of the Librarian and Archivist of Lambeth Palace Library (LPL), Dr Giles Mandelbrote, RHUL MA students visited the Library to examine original Greek manuscripts. Mrs Clare Brown, LPL Archivist, introduced the students to the history of LPL and its collections. Dr Christopher Wright presented the Greek Manuscript collection and sub-collections, and Dr Dendrinos guided the students in examining four representative manuscripts. The first MS, LPL 461, contains anti-Latin treatises by George Scholarios. The text, copied by an anonymous scribe, is heavily annotated and corrected by the hand of Scholarios, who placed his autograph signature (f. 1r, top margin), after he became a monk (1450) and before he ascended to the Patriarchal throne as Gennadios II (1454). The codex was owned at some stage by the scholar Patriarch of Alexandria Meletios I Pegas (1590-1601). It seems that either he or his successor and later Patriarch of Constantinople Cyril Loukaris, who in 1595 was syncellus at the Patriarchate of Alexandria, presented it to the Archbishop of Canterbury George Abbot (†1633), who in turn donated it to LPL. The second MS, LPL 1195, an incomplete Acts and Epistles Lectionary for Saturdays/Sundays, was copied by the anagnostes Sophianos on 8 August 1531. In his colophon (p. 148), he records that on completion of his copying the MS in Constantinople he saw ‘the star, namely the sign’, that is the comet of Halley. This codex was acquired by Professor J.D. Carlyle from St Sabas Monastery, Palestine in 1801-2. The third MS, Sion L40.2/G7, preserves Gregory of Nazianzus, Orations with scholia. This 11th/12th century deluxe parchment codex was copied by the scribe Petros and was ornamented by beautiful coloured headpieces and elaborate initials. Interestingly, a ‘corrector’ has carefully erased all muted iotas in the text. Finally, MS Sion L40.2/G9, a 15th/16th century small paper codex (93x67mm), contains an Euchologion copied by various hands who have added simple vignettes and initials in red ink. A subscription on f. <IVr> contains a request for the purchase of a Greek-Latin Bible from England: διμήτριε· καλὸ κατεβόδιο εἰς την εγλητέρα παρακαλό σε να μου φέρης μία παλεια ἤγουν την θια γραφη γκρέκο λατήλα (sic) ἐ[.]μένα τοῦ παπᾶ τοῦ εφημέριου τοῦ ἀγίου νικολάου τοῦ γέρου. This visit is part of a close collaboration between the Hellenic Institute and LPL over the cataloguing and study of the Greek Manuscript Collection.

Forthcoming events

7 April 2013: concert dedicated to ‘Arcadia’ to be performed by the Symphonic Orchestra Arcadia Mundi, under the auspices of the International Society for Arcadia (ISA), in St John, Smith’s Square, London at 7.30pm. The repertoire includes Beethoven, Prometheus Overture, Britten, The Young Apollo, Bernstein, Serenade after Plato’s Symposium, Debussy, Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune and Syrinx, Mouquet, Pan et les Oiseaux, Nielsen, Pan and Syrinx, Sibelius, Pan and Echo, Nikos Skalkottas, Arkadikos, Mikis Theodorakis, Greek Dances and Manos Hadjidakis, Marsyas (first performance).

To be conducted by Anastasios Strikos with Angelos Antonopoulos acting as narrator. For further information please visit http://www.sjss.org.uk/ events/arcadia-mundi-1

25-26 April 2013: International Colloquium “From Antiphon to Autocue: Speechwriting Ancient and Modern” to be held at The Hellenic Centre, 16-18 Paddington Street, London W1U 5AS. The first day will comprise papers on Greek Speechwriting under two Panels: (1) “Speechwriting and the Athenian Law Courts” to be presented by Professor Michael Gagarin (Texas), “Logography and the Development of Athenian Forensic Argument”, Professor Chris Carey (UCL), “Ethics in the Second Oldest Profession: Thoughts on Lysias’ logography”, Professor Mike Edwards (Trinity St David, Lampeter), “Logographer and client in the speeches of Isaeus” and Dr Eleni Volonaki (Peloponnese), “Lykourgos”; and Panel (2) with papers on “Speechwriting for the Assembly?” by Professor Niall Livingstone (Birmingham), “Alcidamas on Improvisation: Theorising Political Authority in a Democracy”, Dr Christos Kremmydas (RHUL), “Political Speechwriting in Classical Athens?”, Professor Lene Rubinstein (RHUL), “Stage-managing symbouleutic speeches”, and Dr Alessandro Vatri (Oxford), “Speeches for hearers, speeches for readers: Attic oratory and the linguistics of performance”. The second day will be devoted to Roman Speechwriting with papers by Professor Catherine Steel (Glasgow), “Orators, speechwriters and other editorial aids in the late Republic”, Dr Gesine Manuwald (UCL), “Cicero as a writer of speeches”, and Dr Jacqueline Klooster (Ghent), “The Speeches of the Roman emperors in Suetonius’ Lives of the twelve Caesars”, followed by Byzantine Speechwriting with papers by Dr Ida Toth (Oxford), title to be announced, Dr Tassos Tyflopoulos (KCL), “Take My Word for It: Speechwriting, Authenticity and the Emperor Constantine I”, and finally Modern Speechwriting with papers by Richard Toye, “Churchill and his Speechwriters”, Tom Clarke, “The speech, the speaker, his script, and its writer: Paul Keating, Don Watson, and the ‘Redfern Park Speech’”, Professor Andrew Tolson (De Montfort), “Audience Address in the 2010 Election”, and Simon Lancaster, title to be announced. The event is organised by RHUL Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric. For further information please visit http://www.rhul.ac.uk/cor/ home.aspx

5 June 2013:  paper on “Wailing, Lamentations and Tears: Byzantium and the Turks in the Fifteenth Century” by Christopher Hobbs, at the History Department Postgraduate Seminar, RHUL premises at 11 Bedford Square, Room G3, London at 5.15pm.

14 June 2013: International Conference “Speaking in Tongues: Language, Communication and Power in the Middle Ages” to be held at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. Communication in the Middle Ages could take place within a wide spectrum of languages, dialects, and tongues. This conference, planned for the 14th of June 2013, will explore how the use and manipulation of language can contribute to our understanding of ‘real-world’ medieval cultural interaction, and investigate how complex ideas and societal mores were communicated and translated between languages. How did people overcome the governmental and administrative challenges in multilingual environments, such as diplomatic missions to the Mongols, knightly organisations, courts, and trading entrepôts? How were concepts and theories transmitted through cultures, across borders, or within the peripheries of Christendom, even within large institutions such as the Church or multi-ethnic polities, such as the Holy Roman or Byzantine empires? What kind of problems presented themselves in the realms of East-West relations, synods, and church councils, where complex doctrine and beliefs were discussed, debated and translated? This interdisciplinary conference, bringing together the linguistic, cultural, and historical, will be held at the IHR in central London. It will comprise of four broad thematic strands, interspersed with refreshments, a catered lunch, and a keynote lecture, delivered by Dr Alan V. Murray (Leeds). Cultural and political interaction in central and eastern Europe”: lines of inquiry could include the imposition of German settlement and law in Slavic lands, how legal problems and grievances were resolved in multi-lingual communities and the difficulties which French and German European noble houses, such as the Angevins or the Luxemburgs, had in ruling their polyglot Eastern domains. Ecclesiastical administration and theory”: the practicalities of synods and councils, managing conflict within ecclesiastical communities, translation of documents involved in papal government, and the problems the papacy and the ecclesiastical hierarchy faced in transmitting its ideas and organisation on a ‘global’ scale. Byzantium and the gateway to Europe”: possible areas of interest may include the transfer of scientific principles into and out of Christian Europe; the Byzantine state’s government of a wide array of different ethnic, and hence linguistic, groups, and the role of language in trading networks in the Aegean and beyond. The Latin East, crusader states, and knightly orders”: potential areas of investigation would be the role of language in the administration and diplomacy of multi-lingual and multi-cultural states in the Holy Land, whether Christian or Muslim; the challenges knightly orders faced when dealing with a ‘worldwide’ membership; and how ideas on religious warfare permeated across cultures. The Conference is sponsored by RHUL, the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, the Hellenic Institute, the Society for the Promotion of Byantine Studies and the German History Society. For further information please visit http://events.history.ac.uk/ event/show/8927 or contact the co-organisers, Simon Parsons and Mark Whelan, at speakingintonguesconference@gmail.com

18 October 2013: Fifth Annual Memorial for Julian Chrysostomides. Details to be announced.

 

Hellenic Institute’s Studentships (2013):

For students who pursue the MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, or MPhil/PhD research in Byzantine Studies at the Hellenic Institute:

  • The Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomaios I Studentship in Byzantine Studies, established by the Orthodox Cultural Association of Athens in honour of His All-Holiness the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomaios I, thanks to the generous donation by Mrs Angeliki Frangou in memory of her mother Stela N. Frangou.
  • The Nikolaos Oikonomides Studentship in Byzantine Studies, established by the Friends of the Hellenic Institute in memory of the distinguished Greek Byzantinist Nikolaos Oikonomides (1934-2000), in recognition of his outstanding contribution to Byzantine Studies.

For students who pursue the MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, or the MA History: Hellenic Studies, or MPhil/PhD research in Byzantine and Hellenic Studies at the Hellenic Institute:

  • The Panagiotis and Eleni Xenou Postgraduate Studentship in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies, established by Mrs Politeia Katekou in memory of her parents.
  • The Charalambos and Eleni Pelendrides Postgraduate Studentship in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies, established by Dr Andreas Pelendrides in memory of his parents.

All Studentships cover the tuition fees at UK/EU rate for one year and are open to full-time and part-time students. They are awarded on the basis of proven academic achievement. Candidates should meet the normal entrance requirements of the University of London. The closing date for submission of applications is 2 September 2013.


Hellenic Institute’s bursaries (2013):

  • The George of Cyprus Bursaries in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies. Sponsored by the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, these bursaries were established in honour of George of Cyprus (later Ecumenical Patriarch Gregory II, 1283-9). Born in Cyprus, in 1240, then under Latin occupation, at the age of seventeen he fled to Nicaea, the Byzantine Empire in exile, in order to pursue his studies. After the restoration of the Byzantine Empire in 1261, he settled in Constantinople, where he completed his higher education and subsequently taught the eminent scholars of the next generation. One aspect of his personality was his tenacity and dedication to his studies, despite enormous adversities.
  • The Julian Chrysostomides Memorial Bursaries in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies, established by the Friends of the Hellenic Institute in memory of the distinguished Byzantinist J. Chrysostomides (1928-2008), Emeritus Reader in Byzantine History, Ambassador of Hellenism and former Director of RHUL Hellenic Institute.
  • The Pat Macklin Memorial Bursaries in Hellenic and Byzantine Studies, established by the Friends of the Hellenic Institute in memory of the former student, Friend and supporter of the Hellenic Institute Pat Macklin (1915-2009).

All bursaries are offered to Hellenic Institute’s part-time or full-time MA and MPhil/PhD students towards maintenance support and general expenses for study and research.

Hellenic Institute’s prizes (2013):
  • The Joan Mervyn Hussey Prize in Byzantine Studies in memory of the distinguished Byzantine scholar and teacher J.M. Hussey (1907-2006), Emeritus Professor of History in the University of London and former Head of the History Department at Royal Holloway College. The Prize (£500) is awarded annually to Hellenic Institute students who complete the MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies with the mark of distinction.
  • The John Penrose Barron Prize in Hellenic Studies in memory of the distinguished Hellenist J.P. Barron (1934-2008), former Director of the Institute of Classical Studies of the University of London, Master of St Peter’s College Oxford, and Member of the Hellenic Institute’s Steering Group. The Prize (£250) is awarded annually to Hellenic Institute students who complete the MA in History: Hellenic Studies with the mark of distinction.

There are no special application forms for the studentships and bursaries. Applicants should send a letter of application to Dr Charalambos Dendrinos, Director, The Hellenic Institute, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX; e-mail: Ch.Dendrinos@rhul.ac.uk.

Courses in Modern Greek Language and Culture to be offered in 2013

  • Aspects of Modern Greek Language and Culture (Modern Greek for Beginners). No previous knowledge of Greek is required.

The course aims at:

  • Establishing basic communication skills in Greek
  • Providing students with the skills to communicate in Greek in a variety of everyday situations
  • Introducing students to a range of grammatical structures
  • Introducing students to some aspects of contemporary Greek culture
  • Establishing linguistic skills and attitudes required for promoting and facilitating further study of Greek

Time and venue: Monday 12:00-13:00 in Bourne Room 602 and 13:00-14:00 in Founder’s Building West, Room 32; Tuesday 14:00-15:00 in Arts Building, Room 16

2. Further aspects of Modern Greek Language and Culture (Intermediate Modern Greek). Basic knowledge of Classical or Modern Greek is required.

The course aims at:

  • Developing communication skills in Greek
  • Providing students with more advanced skills to communicate in Greek in a variety of everyday situations
  • Introducing students to a wider range of grammatical structures
  • Introducing students to further aspects of contemporary Greek culture
  • Developing linguistic skills and attitudes required for promoting and facilitating further study of Greek

Time and venue: Thursday 14:00-16:00, Tuesday 11:00-13:00, Department of Classics, Founder's Building West, Room FBW32

Both courses place emphasis on developing students’ understanding and appreciation of contemporary Greek society and culture. Thus, a variety of topics concerning Greek language and Modern Greek history and literature are discussed in class, including the Greek War for Independence and European Romanticism, the poetry of Dionysios Solomos and the ideal of freedom, the disaster in Asia Minor (Mikrasiatike Katastrophe) and the Greek civil war in Modern Greek poetry and cinema, as well as Public Services in Greece. Both courses also discuss aspects of continuity in Greek language and culture by looking at the classical past in Modern Greek politics.

3. Informal course: Beginners’ Modern Greek

This course is open to all students and members of staff.

Time and venue: Tuesday 12:00-14:00 in Bourne Annexe, Room 290.

Sponsored by the Greek Ministry of Education these courses are open to all students and members of staff. No tuition fees are required for auditing these courses. Further informationis available from Dr Polymnia Tsagouria, Tutor of Modern Greek, Department of Classics, Founder's Building West, Room FBW32, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, United Kingdom; tel. +44 (0)1784 443417 (Department of Classics); fax +44 (0)1784 439855; e-mail: P.Tsagouria@rhul.ac.uk

Major Research Projects

The Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library Cataloguing Project

Lambeth Palace Library (LPL) is the historic library of the archbishops of Canterbury and the principal library and record office for the history of the Church of England. Founded as a public library by Archbishop Bancroft in 1610, its collection have been freely available for research ever since. Officially designated by the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council as outstanding in national and international importance, the LPL Collection, which includes Western medieval and Byzantine manuscripts, focuses on ecclesiastical history. The Library forms part of the National Church Institutions and, as such, receives no public funding.

As part of an on-going collaborative programme between the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) which dates from 2003, University of London students attending Greek Palaeography courses and research students in Classical and Byzantine Studies have been visiting LPL at the invitation of its Librarians and Archivists, to examine and study original Greek manuscripts as part of their training in Greek Palaeography and Codicology. In addition, an exhibition of the Greek Manuscript Collection was organised jointly by LPL and RHUL Hellenic Institute on the occasion of the 21st International Congress of Byzantine Studies in London (23-24 August 2006). The exhibition was accompanied by a catalogue with the first complete inventory of the collection, compiled by a team of scholars and graduate students under the guidance of the late Julian Chrysostomides and Dr Dendrinos, and the support of the late John Barron and Mrs Clare Brown. The inventory, which was warmly received by Byzantinists, was the first stage towards the study of this important collection. In the Preface, the then Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams expressed His intention ‘to make these important manuscripts at last fully available to the scholarly world’ and His wish that this inventory would be followed ‘by their eagerly anticipated full catalogue’.

Thanks to a generous grant (£121,000 over two years) awarded by The A.G. Leventis Foundation and with the support of LPL and Royal Holloway, University of London, a full analytical catalogue of this collection is currently in preparation by Dr Christopher Wright and Miss Maria Argyrou under the guidance of Dr Dendrinos, thus fulfilling the intention and wish on the part of the Anglican Church and at the same time providing a valuable tool for students and scholars of Greek history, literature, theology and palaeography internationally.

The Greek Manuscript Collection consists of fifty-three Greek codices acquired by LPL since its founding as a public library in 1610, including those donated in 2006 by Sion College, an institution for clergy founded in the City of London in the late 1620’s. Dated between the tenth and seventeenth centuries, these manuscripts include the Octateuch with catena and synopses of Old Testament texts, Gospel Books and Lectionaries, Acts and Epistles, the Book of Revelation, Apocryphal texts on Jesus and the Apostles, liturgical texts, Menaia and synaxaria/menologia, theological works, treatises and excerpts (by Justin the Martyr, Irenaeus of Lyon, Athanasius of Alexandria, Clement of Alexandria, John Chrysostom, John Damascene), Gerontika, Classical authors (Aeschylus, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Libanius, Lycophron, Dionysius Periegetes), post-Byzantine texts (Chronicle in vernacular Greek by an anonymous author, and Damaskenos Studites, On Animals), and papers on, and descriptions and collations of, LPL manuscripts. Among the most important manuscripts is codex 461 containing theological treatises by George Scholarios (later Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Gennadios II), with his autograph signature, notes and corrections.

The largest single component of the collection is the set of manuscripts acquired by Professor J.D. Carlyle in the eastern Mediterranean in 1800-1801 for the establishment of a new critical edition of the Greek New Testament and bought for the Library after his death. It transpired that some of the manuscripts had in fact only been borrowed by Carlyle from religious institutions in the East, and when the Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem requested their return, eleven were handed over in 1817 and ordered to be placed in the Patriarchal Library. Three of these are identifiable in the catalogue of that library, but the other eight have yet to be traced. The available information on their contents and binding should enable some or all of these to be identified by examining manuscripts in the Patriarchal
Library in Jerusalem.

The finished catalogue, to be completed in August 2014, will be published in downloadable PDF format on the websites of LPL and RHUL Hellenic Institute, thus further enhancing the accessibility of, and interest in, this collection among scholars and the public worldwide. It will shed light on textual, palaeographical and codicological aspects of these important manuscripts which so far remain largely unexplored and will advance our knowledge on the relations between the Anglican Church and the Eastern Orthodox Patriarchates between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, a period of major political and ecclesiastical changes in Europe and the Middle East.

The progress of the Project is monitored by the Project Board consisting of the following members:

  • Mrs Clare Brown, LPL Archivist - Internal LPL Advisor
  • Dr Annaclara Cataldi Palau, Visiting Professor in Greek Palaeography, RHUL Hellenic Institute, History Department - Internal RHUL Advisor
  • Dr Charalambos Dendrinos - Project Director
  • Dr Pat Easterling, Emeritus Regius Professor of Greek, Cambridge University - External Advisor
  • Dr Giles Mandelbrote, LPL Librarian and Archivist - Chairman of the Project Board
  • Revd Dr Joseph A. Munitiz, S.J., former Master of Campion Hall, Oxford University - External Advisor
  • Professor Nicholas Pickwoad, Director of the Ligatus Research Centre, University of the Arts London - Internal LPL Advisor
  • Mr Philip Taylor, Honorary Research Associate, Hellenic Institute, History Department, former RHUL webmaster - Internal RHUL IT Advisor

The Hellenic Institute would like to express its deepest thanks to the former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams for his kind permission to study the LPL Greek Manuscript Collection; Dr Giles Mandelbrote, Mrs Clare Brown and the LPL staff for their support and co-operation; and the A.G. Leventis Foundation for its generous grant and continued support towards RHUL Hellenic Institute’s research activities for the promotion of Hellenic Studies in general and Anglo-Hellenic Relations in particular.

For further information on the LPL Greek Manuscript Collection and the Project please visit http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/LPL-Greek-MSS-Cataloguing-Project.html

An electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) —British Library MS Royal 16 C X

In December 2009 a group of scholars met in Vienna to present and discuss their research on Greek authors, manuscripts and texts of the Byzantine period, focusing on editorial issues and practices. Part of the proceedings of this International Workshop on Textual Criticism and Editorial Practice for Byzantine Texts, organised jointly by the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Cyprus, was devoted to the editing of autographs and to electronic editions of Greek texts (http://hw.oeaw.ac.at/7132-4). At the closing session of this Workshop Dr Dendrinos and Professor Caroline Macé undertook, on behalf of the group, to produce an electronic edition of an unpublished Greek autograph text in an attempt to explore the possibilities and limitations of such an approach. Soon, a team of postgraduate students, scholars and technical advisors was formed at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL), to put this project into practice in close collaboration with the British Library.

Although the team was aware of existing work in the field, notably The Codex Sinaiticus Project of the British Library (see http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/), they decided to adopt an ex nihilo approach so as to give themselves the necessary freedom to explore the possibilities without the constraints that would have been imposed by an attempt to replicate and then improve existing work. Developing new ideas and techniques the team has since been preparing the present online edition of George Etheridge’s autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I, aiming at offering a useful tool not only to students and scholars but also to the general public. In the process numerous scholarly, educational and technical questions have been raised by members of the team as well as students and colleagues who have been invited to comment and offer suggestions on preliminary versions of the edition. Given the technical, time and funding limitations, not all of these questions have found a satisfactory answer nor have all ideas and suggestions yet been fully explored or applied. It is the aim of this project to continue inviting, developing, testing, applying and sharing new approaches and practices concerning both conventional and electronic editing of texts, Greek in particular.

In this respect, this is an on-going exploratory, interactive editorial project which has a life of its own. Our hope is that in the future it will keep growing, developing and maturing, hopefully with the help of experts and non-experts who would be willing to share their thoughts and work with us in order to improve it. It is just as important for us that members of the public are externally involved in this project, offering their comments, ideas and suggestions on how to make this and similar editions more accessible, readable, useful and indeed enjoyable, without at the same time compromising its quality in terms of scholarship. For this reason we have supplied this web site with a Feedback option.

This annotated edition and translation of George Etheridge’s autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I is the result of concerted effort. Without the help, support and encouragement of the following contributors the realisation of this project would not have been possible. We would first of all like to thank the British Library for their fruitful collaboration and support in providing us with high-resolution digital images of the Royal MS 16 C X, and for their kind permission to reproduce them in our edition. We would also like to express our thanks to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® Digital Library Project at the University of California, Irvine, the Perseus Digital Library Project at Tufts University, and The Archimedes Digital Research Library Project, a joint endeavour of the Classics Department at Harvard University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG) in Berlin, and the English Department at the University of Missouri at Kansas City, for their kind permission to link our edition with entries in their online Liddell and Scott-Jones, Greek-English Lexicon and Lewis and Short, Latin Dictionary.

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support we have received from RHUL Hellenic Institute, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Research Initiative Fund and Professor Annaclara Cataldi Palau towards the completion of the first stage of the project.

Among students and colleagues who have been contributing with their enthusiasm and hard work to the common effort we would like to express our deep thanks to Michail Konstantinou-Rizos for transcribing, editing and translating George Etheridge’s Latin dedication to Queen Elizabeth I; Vasos Pasiourtides for transcribing and editing the Greek text; Dr Christopher Wright for translating and annotating the Greek text and the translation, and for composing the sections on The Author and The Text; Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos for converting the text to HTML, mapping and linking words and semantic units in the transcribed, edited and translated text; Philip Taylor for designing and developing the electronic side of the edition and for his advice on all technical and non-technical aspects of the project; and Robert Turner for his help in designing the website. We are deeply grateful to Dr Scot McKendrick, Head of History and Classics at the British Library, for his co-operation and for his contribution with the section on The British Library’s Collection of Greek Manuscripts; and Professor Annaclara Cataldi Palau for her description of the Royal MS 16 C X. We would also like to express our warm thanks to Professor Caroline Macé for her co-operation and support in the preliminary phase of the project. We are also indebted to the Revd Dr Andreas Löwe, College Chaplain and Gavan Lecturer in Theology, Trinity College, The University of Melbourne, for the encouragement he offered us when we approached him at the inception of the project to learn more about his work on George Etheridge.

So, our door is open to all and we would like to ask our visitors to explore our work and, time permitting, leave their impressions and, more importantly, their corrections and suggestions. The edition is accessible online, free of charge, at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/ Etheridge/

Last but not least, we are pleased and honoured to dedicate this electronic edition of George Etheridge’s Encomium addressed to Queen Elizabeth I to H.M. Queen Elizabeth II on the occasion of the celebrations of the Diamond Jubilee marking the 60th anniversary of her accession to the throne of the United Kingdom. Πολλὰ τὰ ἔτη!

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Digitisation Projects

The British Library has embarked upon two major digitisation projects, aimed at bringing its manuscripts to new audiences and to encouraging new research. The Greek Manuscripts Digitisation Project, generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, was launched in 2009. To date, more than 500 Greek manuscripts have been published in full on the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts site (http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/), ranging in date from the sixth to the eighteenth centuries, and including such treasures as the Theodore Psalter (Additional MS 19352). Before inclusion in the project, each manuscript has been assessed by a conservator to ensure that it is fit for digitisation. The images benefit from deep zoom technology, allowing users to access the images at great speed and with very detailed results. Another feature of the project is the inclusion of enhanced catalogue descriptions, available alongside the images. Dr Dendrinos and Professor Annaclara Cataldi Palau are offering their expert advice and are serving on the Project Board. The British Library’s Harley Science Project has digitised 150 medieval and early modern manuscripts in the Harley collection, encompassing many aspects of early scientific knowledge, such as astronomy, the computus, mathematics, medicine and veterinary science. The manuscripts selected for this second project range in date from the 9th to the 17th centuries, and are written in a variety of western European languages (including Latin, English, French, German and Italian). The images and corresponding descriptions have now been added to the Digitised Manuscripts web site. The British Library is grateful to William and Judith Bollinger for their generous sponsorship of the digitisation of the Harley science manuscripts. Regular reports on both projects continue to be published on the British Library’s Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts Blog at http://britishlibrary. typepad.co.uk/ digitisedmanuscripts/

 

Papers and research projects by members, former students and associated staff:

Professor Richard Alston was a Fellow of the Arts and Humanities Research Council in 2010-2011. He is completing a book on the role of the military in the fall of the Roman Republic, which is for publication in 2014. He has additionally been involved in studying the influence of Classicism on the end of civilisation. This year he published on the influence of Classical ideas on British city planning. Other projects include a seminar series on Ancient Landscapes that took place in Autumn 2011 at the Institute of Classical Studies. He has been involved in a longer term project on Urbanism and the End of the Ancient World, looking particularly at the Near East and mainland Greece and is developing a project on Classicism in ideas of the modern city.

Dr Mike Carr gave the following papers: “Turkish Pirates and Italian Merchants in the Fourteenth-Century Aegean” at the Departmental Seminar Series RHUL (November 2010); “The Influence of Papal Policy on the Italian Merchants and Turkish Maritime Emirates in the Aegean: 1300-1350” at the Union in Separation: Trading Diasporas in the Eastern Mediterranean (1200-1700) Conference, University of Heidelberg (February 2011); “The Hospitallers of Rhodes and their Alliances Against the Turks, c. 1300-1350” at the Islands and the Military Orders Conference, Rhodes (April 2011); “Crusade and Commercial Exchange Between Christians and Muslims in the Aegean: 1300-1350” at the Late Medieval History Seminar, IHR, London (March 2011); “Angevin Attempts to Re-establish the Latin Empire of Constantinople”, at the Between Worlds: The Age of the Angevines Conference, Targoviste, Romania (October 2011); “Early Contacts Between Menteshe and the Latins in the Aegean (c.1310-12)” at the 2nd International Symposium on the History, Culture and Civilization of Western Anatolian Principalities (Menteshe Principality), Muğla Sıtkı Koçman Üniversitesi, Turkey (April 2012); “The Maritime Republics and Crusades in the Aegean, 1300-1350” University of Münster (May 2012); “Allies or Enemies? The Catalan Grand Company And Crusades Against the Turks”, at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference of the SSCLE, Cáceres, Spain (June 2012); “Pope Benedict XII and the Crusades” at the International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds (July 2012); “Merchants as Crusaders During the Period of Turkish Expansion in the Mediterranean, c. 1300-1500”, at the Harlaxton Medieval Symposium, Harlaxton (July 2012); and “Venice and the Turks in the Adriatic. Italy and Albania: Past and Present”, Presentation to the British Academy at The British School at Rome (December 2012). Dr Carr is currently working on a research project, as Rome Fellow at the British School of Rome, entitled Trade and Crusade between the Italian Mercantile Republics and the Turks: 1300-1500, which explores the complex interplay between holy war ideology and the necessities of commercial exchange, with particular focus on a number of unpublished petitions for trade licences found in the Vatican Registra Supplicationum. He is currently writing an extended article on this topic, to be published in 2014.

Professor Annaclara Cataldi Palau was conferred the title of Academician of the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, Classe di Studi Greci e Latini presented by Professor Carlo Maria Mazzucchi (Dies Academicus 14 February 2012). Professor Cataldi Palau gave the following papers: “I manoscritti, gli scribi, la trasmissione dei testi” at the Accademia delle Scienze dell’Istituto di Bologna (7 April 2011); “Manoscritti greci nel fondo Additional della British Library acquistati da collezionisti inglesi nei secoli XIX-XX” at the Conference Bisanzio sulle due sponde del Canale d'Otranto. XI Giornate di Studi dell'Associazione Italiana di Studi Bizantini, organized by Dr Marina Falla Castelfranchi and Dr Manuela De Giorgi in Lecce (25-27 October 2012). Professor Cataldi Palau to the electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X). Professor Cataladi Palau is currently preparing a volume on the Greek manuscript collection of Angela Burdett Coutts. This study sheds light on this important and hitherto little-known collection of ca. 100 Greek manuscripts which belonged to Baroness Burdett-Coutts (1814-1906). The volume comprises a short biography of the British philanthropist and an overview of the manuscripts and their provenance.

Dr Lia Chisacof, Senior Researcher at the Institute for South-East European Studies (ISSEE) of the Romanian Academy, co-organised with Dr Liviu Bordas the Colloquium Dora d’Istria, Balcanii si Orientul (Dora d’Istria, the Balkans and the Orient) held at the Institute for South-East European Studies of the Romanian Academy (September 2012), where she gave the paper “Maestrul si pupila sa G.G.Papadopol si Dora d’Istria” (“The magister and his pupil, Dora D’Istria and G.G.Papadopoulos”). She also gave a paper on “Copiii lungului secol al XVIII-lea romanesc” (“The children of the long Romanian 18th century”) at the Romanian National Conference Copilaria romaneasca intre familie si societate (secolele XVII-XX) (The Romanian childhood between family and society [17th-20th c.]) held at the Institute “Nicolae Iorga” of the Romanian Academy (4-5 October 2012). Dr Chisacof also delivered a paper on “Phanariot poetry in the Romanian Lands from its dawn to its dusk” at the International Congress Φαναριώτικα στιχουργήματα (Phanariot poetry) organised by the University of Cyprus, Nicosia (7-9 June 2012). In addition, Dr Chisacof published a book on The Romanian Language during the Phanariot Rules (Editions Casa cartii de stiinta from Cluj-Napoca) and co-edited with Catalina Vatasescu a Festschrift in honour of Professor N.S.Tanasoca entitled Polychronion, published by the Romanian Academy. Dr Chisacof is currently organising a conference on the history of medicine in Romania in the eigtheenth century, which is part of her on-going research project involving an annotated edition of a lengthy Romanian eighteenth-century medical manuscript, which reflects the continuity of the Byzantine medical tradition in Romania in this period.

Dr Nikolaos Chrissis gave the following papers: “Charles of Anjou’s anti-Byzantine ‘crusade’ (1267-1282): a re-examination” at the 43rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, University of Birmingham on 29 March 2010; “Re-integrating the European Middle Ages in Greek university history teaching: the crusades as a case-study” (in Greek) at the Academic Workshop “Medieval and Early Modern European History in Greek Universities: Research and Teaching” (University of Crete, 25-27 November 2011); “Of heretics and Christian brothers: Pope Gregory IX (1227-41) and the Greek East” at the 22nd International Congress of Byzantine Studies (Sofia, 22-27 August 2011); “Tearing Christ’s seamless tunic? The ‘Eastern Schism’ and Crusades against the Greeks in the thirteenth century” at the London Society for Medieval Studies (Institute of Historical Research, London, 21 February 2012) and at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference of the SSCLE (Cáceres, Spain, 25-29 June 2012); “Byzantine Crusaders: holy war and crusade rhetoric in Byzantine contacts with the West (1095-1341)” at the Crusades and the Latin East Seminar Series of the Institute of Historical Research (London, 26 March 2012). He is currently working on the EU-funded post-doctoral research project Worlds Apart? Identity and Otherness in Late Byzantine Perceptions of the West: The Evidence of Oratory and Correspondence, conducted at the University of Athens.

Dr Charalambos Dendrinos headed a team of postgraduate students, fellow scholars and IT advisors at RHUL, who produced, in collaboration with Dr Scot McKendrick, Head of History and Classics at the British Library, an electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X). The launching of the online edition took place at the Research Seminar of RHUL History Department on 19 February 2013. Dr Dendrinos continued his co-operation with the British Library, as external advisor and member of the Board of the Digitisation of Greek Manuscripts Project, and with Lambeth Palace Library over The Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library Cataloguing Project, in collaboration with Dr Christopher Wright and Miss Maria Argyrou. He also continued his co-operation with Dr John Demetracopoulos and a team of scholars, who are preparing critical editions of Greek translations of, and commentaries on, various works by Thomas Aquinas composed by Byzantine scholars and theologians between the late thirteenth and fifteenth centuries, as part of the international research project Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/Thomas.htm. At the invitation of the organisers of the Oxford Greek Palaeography Summer School Dr Dendrinos also taught an advanced class at The Stelios Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies (13-17 June 2012). He co-organised the 2012 ICS Byzantine Colloquium When East met West. The Reception of Latin Philosophical and Theological Thought in Late Byzantium, held in Senate House, London (12 June 2012) and the International Colloquium George of Cyprus and his World, held in memory of Constantine Leventis (1938-2002) and Julian Chrysostomides (1928-2008) at The Hellenic Centre, London (18 October 2012). He is currently preparing an annotated translation of Emperor Manuel II Palaeologus’ treatise On the Procession of the Holy Spirit, discourse On the Order in the Trinity, and Epistolary discourse on the study of theology addressed to Alexius Iagoup, and continues his research on unpublished texts by Manuel II and his intellectual entourage.

Dr Laura Franco continued her research on the paraphrasis of St John’s Gospel by Nonnus of Panopolis as Research Fellow at the Classics Department, University of Cyprus (2011-12). She also continued revising her PhD thesis for publication. Her thesis sheds light on the method and techniques used by the tenth-century Byzantine hagiographer Symeon Metaphrastes and his team in re-working earlier hagiographical material. It is based on an annotated editio princeps of the metaphrastic Passio of St James the Persian (BHG 773), Passio of St Plato (BHG 1551-1552), and Vita of St Hilarion (BHG 755). In addition, Dr Franco has contributed to the catalogue of the exhibition L'editto di Milano e il tempo della tolleranza. Costantino 313 d.C., organised by Professor G. Sena Chiesa at the Palazzo Reale, Milan held in the Palazzo Reale, Milan (25 October 2012-17 March 2013). Dr Franco will be teaching an introductory session on Greek Palaeography at the 2013 University of London Palaeography Summer School (June 2013).

Professor Jonathan Harris gave a keynote lecture on “The Patriarch of Constantinople and the last days of Byzantium” at a conference on The Patriarchate of Constantinople in Context and Comparison, Institut für Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna in September 2012. He has given the following papers: “Prequel to the Crusades: Christian Byzantium confronts Islam (c.750-1050 CE)”, History Society, King’s College London (November 2012); “War without End? Christian Byzantium confronts Islam (c.750-1050 CE)”, History Today Conference on Encounters: Europe and the World from Antiquity to the Present Day, London; “The role of Greek émigrés in East-West cultural communication before and after the fall of Constantinople”, International Conference on Mediterranean Cities: Civilisation and development: Institut d'Estudis Catalans and Institut Europeu de la Mediterrània, Barcelona (November 2011). He will be speaking on: “Byzantium and the Crusades: Two Avenues of Approach”, at The Crusades Through Byzantine Eyes Colloquium, Queens College, City University of New York in April 2013. Professor Harris is currently working on a general survey of Byzantine history for Yale University Press and a second edition of his 2003 book, Byzantium and the Crusades, for Bloomsbury.

Dr Richard Hawley continued preparing an undergraduate guide to approaching the subject of Greco-Roman gender by looking at the problems of sources by genre, entitled Studying classical gender: sources and methods, to be published by Wiley-Blackwell; and three contributions, on ‘Beauty’, ‘Eroticism’, ‘Intelligence’ and ‘The Male and Female Body’, to the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Greek Tragedy. Dr Hawley is also continuing his research project on a commentary on Plutarch’s Banquet of the Seven Sages.


Michael Heslop is completing a volume on The Countryside of Rhodes: 1306-1421 with (†) J. Chrysostomides, A. Luttrell and G. O’Malley. He gave a Paper on “Fear and Ingenuity in the Byzantine Dodecanese; the flight to safety on Tilos (c.650-1306)” at the 44th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies at Newcastle (8-10 April 2011) and a Paper on “Byzantine Defences in the Dodecanese Islands: Planned or Improvised” at the inaugural SPBS-Friends of the British School at Athens Joint Lecture in London (20 March 2012). He also gave a paper on “The Search for the Defensive System of the Knights in Northern Rhodes” at the SSCLE Quadrennial Conference held in Caceres, Spain (25 -29 June 2012), and a plenary paper on “The Defences of Middle Byzantine Greece (7th-12th centuries)” with N. Kontogiannis at the 46th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies held at the University of Birmingham (23 -25 March 2013). He is also Chair of the Organising Committee for the 6th International Military Order Conference to be held in Clerkenwell, London (5-8 September 2013).

Professor Ahuvia Kahane’s most recent presentations (2011-2013) include “Digital Philology” (Open University); “Monuments, Ruins and Historical Time,” (L-40, Rosa Luxemburg Platz, Berlin, re-launch of C&G “Monument to Historical Time”); “The Dis-Continuity of Genre: Greece and Rome” in “Trends in the Classics” annual conference, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki; “Symmetry, Social Order, and Homer’s Modernity,” Classical Association Annual Meeting, University of Durham; “Jewish Ruins and the End of the Word”, in “Civilisational Collapse” conference, British Library. Professor Kahane’s research in progress includes various monographs and edited volumes contracted by various presses and journals, including Homer: A Guide to the Perplexed (Continuum, 2012); Epic, Novel, and the Progress of Antiquity (Bloomsbury, forthcoming); Antiquity and the Ruin (special issue of Revue europeéne d’histoire, 2012); Chaos and the Code of Informality (in Hebrew, Resling, Tel Aviv, 2013). Among his recently published articles is work on ‘Homer and the Jews in Antiquity’, on psychoanalysis, Antigone, and the work of Jacques Lacan, on slavery ancient and modern, on continuities of genre in Greece and Rome, and more. He is currently working on a book on the modern painter Cy Twombly and the classical heritage and also preparing a revision of the online Chicago Homer project (http://digital.library.northwestern.edu/homer/), which currently attracts about three quarters of a million hits annually. Finally, Professor Kahane contributed with an introduction to the volume Vicissitudes: Histories and Destinies of Psychoanalysis, eds S. Kivland and N. Segal (Institute of Romance and Germanic Studies Books: School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2013).

Michael Konstantinou-Rizos is participating in two ongoing research projects. The first involves the compilation of A Lexicon of Terms in Greek Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics, in collaboration with Dr Fevronia Nousia under the guidance of Professor Nikolaos Moschonas and Dr Dendrinos, funded by RHUL Hellenic Institute). The second project, funded by the Foundation for the Study of the Works of Vikentios Damodos (Corfu, Greece), prepares the editio princeps of the 18th-century Greek philosopher Vikentios Damodos’ autograph Physiologia (Library of the University of Thessalonica, Cod. 52), to be published by the Academy of Athens. He has also contributed to the electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X).

Dr Christos Kremmydas is currently co-editing two volumes. The first, with Dr Kathryn Tempest, is entitled Continuity and Change: Oratory in the Hellenistic Period and brings together eighteen papers by leading scholars in the fields of Greek and Roman Literature and History; it will be published by Oxford University Press in Spring 2013. The second, with Professors Lene Rubinstein and Jonathan Powell, is entitled Profession and Performance: Aspects of Greco-Roman Oratory and will be published as a Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies later in 2013. He is also co-organising (with Professors Rubinstein and Powell) the International Conference From Antiphon to Autocue: Speechwriting Ancient and Modern to be held in London (25-26 April 2013).

Chrysovalantis Kyriacou gave two papers, the first on “Hesychasm and Byzantine Orthodox identity in Cyprus under Latin Rule: the historical context of John Kantakouzenos’ Letter to the Bishop John of Karpasia (1371)” at the Graduate Student Day Workshop Legacies and Discontinuities in the Eastern Mediterranean: comparative and innovative methodologies in Late Antique, Byzantine and Ottoman Studies, organised by theCentral European University Budapest, Centre for Eastern Mediterranean Studies (3-4 June 2011). The second paper: “Aπό τον Όσιο Νεόφυτο τον Έγκλειστο στον Όσιο Σάββα τον Βατοπαιδινό: Ο προπαλαμικός Ησυχασμός στην Κύπρο και την Ανατολική Μεσόγειο (ca. 1200-ca.1350)” (“From St Neophytos the Recluse to St Sabas of Vatopedion. Pre-Palamite Hesychasm on Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean ca.1200-ca.1350”) was given at the Επιστημονικό Συμπόσιο Κύπρος και Άγιον Όρος (Cyprus and Mount Athos Symposium), organised by the Society of Cypriot Studies.

Dr Georgios Liakopoulos continued the revision of his thesis for publication by the Royal Asiatic Society and and Tarih Vakfı, and his research on Ottoman cadastres, historical geography and epigraphy. He gave several papers, including “The Contribution of GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to the Historical Geography of Greece in the Light of Ottoman Taxation Cadastres” at İstanbul Şehir University (5 June 2012), and “An Introduction to Ottoman Cartography” at The Islamic Arts Museum of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur (19 April 2011).

Dr Anthony Luttrell gave conference talks at Mugla (Turkey) on Timur and Menteshe 1402-1407; at Tomar (Portugal) on Bodrum Castle after 1407; at Troyes (France) on The Templars’ Early Economy; and at Mistra (Greece) on Rhodian Views of Antiquity after 1306. He was awarded the Priz Gustave Schlumberger from the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, Paris (2011), for contributions to the study of the Latin Levant. He is currently working on a general book on the Order of the Hospital 1306-1421.

Brian McLaughlin gave a paper on “Cowards Against Crusaders? Byzantine military failure and the Fourth Crusade” at the RHUL History Department Postgraduate Seminar (7 March 2012). He was an invited participant in the panel discussion “Did the Byzantines have their own version of Holy War?”, including giving a short paper, as part of “The Writing of Medieval History: Debates, Definitions and Approaches”, hosted by the Institute of Historical Research, London (15 June 2012).

Dr Janett Morgan is composing a monograph for a new series on ancient Iraq expected to be published by Edinburgh University Press in 2013. Her contribution focuses on Greek and Persian interaction. She participated in the conference “The Hellenistic Court” hosted by The Centre for the Study of the Hellenistic World (CSHW), School of History, Classics & Archaeology, The University of Edinburgh (25-27 February 2011). The conference aimed at re-establishing the importance of recognising the royal court as a major component in the culture of the Greek-speaking world in the period c.323-31 BCE. Dr Morgan’s Paper “At home with royalty: constructing the hellenistic palace” looked at the architecture of early ‘palaces’.

Dr Fevronia Nousia completed revising her PhD thesis Byzantine Textbooks of the Palaeologan Period, to be published in the Vatican series Studi e testi. She continued her collaboration with Professor Nikolaos Moschonas, Dr Dendrinos and Michael Konstantinou-Rizos over the compilation of A Lexicon of Terms in Greek Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics, and is contributing to the international project Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus. Dr Nousia is currently preparing a critical edition of the Περί Σχεδῶν by Manuel Moschopoulos, under the guidance of Dr Dendrinos. The project was presented at the Colloquium Παρεκβολών Ημέρα. Ημερίδα επιστημονικού διαλόγου για τη βυζαντινή λογοτεχνία (Digression Day. Colloquium on a scholarly dialogue on Byzantine literature) organised by the Editorial Committee of the journal Parekbolai (14 December 2012). For information on this project please visit: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/Moschopoulos.htm

Dr Jari Pakkanen was awarded a British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship (£102,781) towards his research Project Quantum models in archaeology and palaeoclimatology (September 2012-August 2013). He continued his collaborative research on The Sea, the City and the God. The Kalaureia Archaeological Project, hosted by the Swedish Archaeological Institute at Athens and funded by the National Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation (see http://www.kalaureia.org). The project combines three different strands of inquiry into an important sanctuary of ancient Greece: archaeological investigation, study of the local religion and its contribution to understanding Greek religion in general, and exploration of the impact of the archaeological remains on the local community. Dr Pakkanen's responsibility is the study and publication of the architecture at the site. His other research projects include Methodological questions in the study of Greek architectural design principles, and the Kyllene Harbour Project he is directing with Dr Angeliki Simosi: these investigations are conducted in collaboration with the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and the Finnish Institute at Athens. Dr Pakkanen gave the following papers: “Quantum models and detecting design patterns in architecture” (keynote speaker) at the conference Art History as a Branch of Scholarship 4. Empiria in Art History, Helsinki (14-15 October 2011); “Nuovo lavoro sull'architettura e topografia di Naxos: ricostruzione dell'agora e del santuario a ovest del santa Venera”, (invited speaker) at the Archaeological Museum of Naxos, Sicily (28 March 2012); and “Pattern detection in archaeological data: quantum modelling, Bronze Age Aegean lead weights and Greek Classical Doric architecture”, at the Digital Classicist &  Institute of Classical Studies Seminar, University of London (8 June 2012). Dr Pakkanen was appointed Director of the Finnish Institute at Athens (1 September 2013-31 December 2016).

Dr Konstantinos Palaiologos has been appointed Research Associate at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® Digital Library Project at the University of California, Irvine. He gave a paper on the use of Latin theological sources in the unpublished treatise On the Error of the Latins by Matthaios Blastares at the 2012 ICS Byzantine ColloquiumWhen East met West: the Reception of Latin Philosophical and Theological Thought in Late Byzantium, which he co-organised (11-12 June 2012). He has also contributed to the electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X). He is continuing his research on the Greek manuscript tradition of the Synoptic Accounts of the Ecumenical Councils.

Vasos Pasiourtides gave a paper on “Demetrios Chrysoloras and Thomas Aquinas in Dialogue” at the 2012 ICS Byzantine Colloquium When East met West. The Reception of Latin Philosophical and Theological Thought in Late Byzantium (12 June 2012). He is currently preparing an edition of the Greek translation of Thomas Aquinas’ De articulis fidei et Ecclesiae sacramentis by an anonymous Byzantine author as part of the international project Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus. He has also contributed to the electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X).

Nil Pektas (née Palabiyik) gave a paper on ”The apparition of the printed word in the Ottoman Capital: book production and circulation in Constantinople, 1453-1729” at the World History Workshop, Cambridge (31 January 2013).

Dr Eleni Rossidou-Koutsou continued her work on an edition of the hitherto unpublished opuscula of the fifteenth-century Byzantine theologian John Eugenikos.

Dr Ed Sanders continued his Leverhulme-funded research project on the Arousal of audience emotions in Classical Greek oratory, including both the Attic oratorical corpus and speeches in the historiography of the period. Several papers from the international conference Erôs in Ancient Greece (University College London, 2009) not published in Nick Lowe, Ed Sanders, Chiara Thumiger and Christopher Carey eds, Erôs in Ancient Greece (Oxford University Press,2013), will be published as a Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies in March 2013, which Dr Sanders is editing. 

Professor Anne Sheppard is currently completing a book entitled The Poetics of Phantasia: Imagination in Ancient Aesthetics, to be published by Bloomsbury Academic. She was on sabbatical leave during the calendar year 2012 and gave papers at international conferences and colloquia in Louvain, Amsterdam, Oxford and Catania. On 24 January 2013 she gave her inaugural lecture as Professor of Ancient Philosophy at Royal Holloway, entitled “Philosophy, politics and education: the significance of Plato’s Gorgias”.

Dr Efi Spentzou gave papers on “Modernist revisions of return: home and domesticity in Seferis’ and Ritsos’ Nostos” at the International Conference on the reception of Nostos held at the University of South Carolina (March 2011) and on “Philhellenic imperialism and the invention of the Classical past: 21st century re-imaginings of Odysseus in the Greek War for Independence” at the International Conference on Ancient Greek Myth and Contemporary World Fiction held at the British Academy (July 2012). Both papers are pilot studies for her bigger project Nostos in Modern Greek Historical Novels of the 1990s-2000s currently in preparation. Dr Spentzou also co-organised, with Dr Dimitris Papanikolaou (Oxford) and Professor Richard Alston (RHUL), a Symposium entitled Greece/Precarious/Europe: Culture and Crisis held at The Hellenic Centre (16 February 2013) and is currently organising jointly with Professor William Fitzgerald (KCL) an International Conference on Psychogeographies in Latin Literature (London, 8-9 July 2013). Dr Spentzou’s volume The Roman Poetry of Love: Elegy and Politics in the Time of Augustus will be published by Bloomsbury Academic in Autumn 2013.

Dr Christos Triantafyllopoulos is revising his PhD thesis on an annotated critical edition of the treatise Against the Errors of the Latins by Makarios, Metropolitan of Ankyra, for publication. He is currently editing Prochoros Kydones, De essentia et operatione Dei, as part of the international project Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus.

Professor David Wiles is lead editor of the Cambridge Companion to Theatre History published in 2013. He is currently investigating classical acting in connection with Baroque performance in the theatre of Drottningholm, and he is planning to investigate further the relationship between classical rhetoric and acting.

Dr Christopher Wright has completed the revision for publication of his PhD thesis The Gattilusi of Lesbos: Diplomacy and Lordship in the Late Medieval Aegean, in development with Cambridge University Press. He has also compiled a database of Byzantine autograph manuscripts, currently being prepared for online publication with the assistance of Phil Taylor, under the guidance of Dr Dendrinos. He is currently preparing an analytical catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library and continuing his research into aspects of the interaction between Byzantium and Latin regimes in the Aegean in the Palaiologan period. In addition, he has also contributed to the electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X).

Dr Barbara Zipser organized a one-day International Conference on Simon of Genoa's Medical Lexicon held in RHUL Bedford Square premises (17 March 2012). The Conference was funded by the Welcome Trust and the RHUL History Department, and its Proceedings will be published by Versita. As part of her research on Simon of Genoa (or Ianuensis) Dr Zipser has also launched an open access wiki edition of his Clavis sanationis (www.simonofgenoa.org), a Latin-Greek-Arabic dictionary of medical terminology. Dr Zipser also gave lectures on “Describing Vision: Galen’s Texts on Eye Anatomy and their Terminology” as part of the Ontology Project at Corpus Christi College, Oxford (September 2012), and on “Theory and Practice in Byzantine Medicine” Pimlico Academy at the invitation of Prince’s Trust (January 2013). She also gave a presentation to primary school children on Byzantine plant drawings and descriptions of frogs, and articipated in the RHUL Science Festival, where she was incorporated into the Biology Department for one day to represent History of Science!

Recent and forthcoming publications by members and associated staff (2011-2013, previously not reported, and forthcoming)

Richard Alston, ‘Political culture in the Greek city after the Classical Age: Introduction and Preview’, in Political Culture in the Greek City after the Classical Age, eds R. Alston and O. van Nijf with Ch. Williamson (Peeters: Louvain, 2011), pp. 1-26

Richard Alston, ‘Post-Politics and the Ancient Greek City’, in Political Culture in the Greek City after the Classical Age, eds R. Alston and O. van Nijf with Ch. Williamson (Peeters: Louvain, 2011), pp. 307-336

Richard Alston, ‘Caesar in Ruins: Memory and Resistance’, in Antiquity and the Ruin, ed. Ahuvia Kahane (= European Review of History 18.5-6 [2011]), pp. 697-716

Richard Alston with Edith Hall and Laura Proffitt eds, Reading Ancient Slavery (Duckworth: London 2011)

Richard Alston, ‘Rereading Ancient Slavery’, in Reading Ancient Slavery, eds R. Alston, E. Hall and L. Proffitt (Duckworth: London, 2011), pp. 1-33

Richard Alston, ‘The Good Master: Pliny, Hobbes, and the Nature of Freedom’, in Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbes to Hollywood, edsR. Alston, E. Hall and J. McConnell (Oxford University Press, 2011), pp. 41-64

Richard Alston and Efi Spentzou, Reflections of Romanity: Discourses of Subjectivity in Imperial Rome, Classical Memories/Modern Identities (Ohio State University Press, 2011)

Richard Alston, ‘Class Cities: Classics, Utopianism, Classics and Urban Planning in Early-Twentieth-Century Britain’, Journal of Historical Geography 38 (2012), 263-272

Richard Alston, ‘Augustan Imperialism’, in A Companion to Ancient Imperialism, ed. D. Hoyos (Brill: Leiden, Boston, 2013), pp. 197-211

Richard Alston, ‘Ethnic Violence in Roman Alexandria: A Comparative Approach’, in Bulletin d’Institut français d’Archeologie Orientale (Caire), Supplement (forthcoming, 2013)

Richard Alston, ‘The Fiction of History: Recalling the Past and Imagining the Future with Caesar at Troy’, Caliope (forthcoming, 2013)

Georgios Borovilos, Ὀρθόδοξη κηρυκτικὴ γραμματεία κατὰ τὸν 18ο αἰώνα. Οἱ ἔντυπες συλλογές (= The Orthodox preaching literature in the 18th century. The printed collections) (Athens, forthcoming, 2013)

Mike Carr, ‘The Hospitallers of Rhodes and their alliances against the Turks’, in Islands and Military Orders, c.1291-1798, eds S. Phillips and E. Buttigieg (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2013)

Mike Carr, ‘Humbert of Viennois and the Crusade of Smyrna: A reconsideration’, Crusades 12 (forthcoming, 2013)

Mike Carr, ‘Papal trade licences, Italian merchants and the changing perceptions of the Mamluks and Turkish beyliks in the fourteenth century’, in Union in Separation - Trading Diasporas in the Eastern Mediterranean (1200-1700), eds G. Christ, S. Burkhardt, R. Zaugg et al. (Springer: Heidelberg, forthcoming 2013)

Mike Carr, ‘Trade or crusade? The Zaccaria of Chios and crusades against the Turks’, in Contact and Conflict in Frankish Greece and the Aegean, 1204-1453: Crusade, Religion and Trade between Latins, Greeks and Turks, eds N. Chrissis and M. Carr (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2013)

Mike Carr and Nikolaos G. Chrissis eds, Contact and Conflict in Frankish Greece and the Aegean, 1204-1453: Crusade, Religion and Trade between Latins, Greeks and Turks (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2013)

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, ‘Deux manuscrits de ménées du monastère du Prodrome de Pétra et le groupe de Kokkinobaphos’, in The Legacy of Bernard de Montfaucon: Three Hundred Years of Studies on Greek Handwriting, Proceedings of the Seventh International Colloquium of Greek Palaeography (Madrid-Salamanca, 15-20 September 2008), eds A. Bravo García and I. Pérez Martín, Bibliologia 31 (Turnhout, 2010), pp. 107-132

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, ‘Manoscritti provenienti dalla Tessaglia a Milano’, in Alethes filia. Studi in onore di Giancarlo Prato, eds M. D’Agostino and P. Degni (Spoleto, 2010), pp. 93-167

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, ‘Mazaris, Giorgio Baiophoros e il monastero di Prodromo Petra’, in Exemplon. Studi in onore di Irmgard Hutter, eds. S. Lucà and F. D’Aiuto, vol. II (Università degli Studi ‘Tor Vergata’: Rome, 2010) (= Nέα Ρώμη 7 [2010]), pp. 367-397

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, A Catalogue of Greek Manuscripts from the Meerman Collection in the Bodleian Library (Bodleian Library Publishing: Oxford, 2011)

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, ‘Jean Stojković de Raguse (†1443): L’influence de ses manuscrits dans la diffusion de la culture byzantine en Suisse et en Allemagne’, in Conférence Scientifique Internationale, Centre de Recherches Slavo-Byzantines «Ivan Dujčev», Sofia 12-14 mai 2006. Annuaire de l’Université de Sofia “St. Kliment Ohridski”, Centre de Recherches Slavo-Byzantines “Ivan Dujčev” 96 (2011), pp. 93-132

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, ‘Un manoscritto di Simeon Uroš Paleologo’, in ”Vie per Bisanzio. Atti di VII Congresso Nazionale dell’Associazione Italiana di Studi Bizantini (Venezia 25-28 novembre 2009), eds A. Rigo, A. Babuin and M. Trizio (Bari, 2013), pp. 689-706

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, Review of D.F. Jackson, The Greek Library of Saints John and Paul (San Zanipolo) at Venice, Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 391 (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies: Tempe, AZ, 2011), in Speculum (forthcoming 2013)

Annaclara Cataldi Palau, The Greek Manuscripts’ Collection of Angela Burdett-Coutts (1814-1906) (Brepols: Turnhout, forthcoming)

Lia Chisacof ed., Ρήγας. Ανέκδοτα Εργα (= Rigas, Unpublished Works) (Πανεπιστημιακές Εκδόσεις Κύπρου and Gutenberg: Nicosia and Athens, 2011)

Lia Chisacof, ‘Beyond the borders of the city Hermannstadt/Sibiu’, Brukenthalia. Romanian Cultural Review 1 (2012), 20-28

Lia Chisacof, Review of L. Koutzelis, Πορταρμπάσηδες , γαλιοντζήδες και τσαράνοι (= Chief ushers, mariners and peasants) (Athens), in To Vima (4 March 2012)

Lia Chisacof, Review of D.N. Maniatis, Οταν αρχινήσουν τα σαγανάκια, βάστα πλια καραβοκύρη (= When the whirls start the captain should stop), in Ta Nea (11 March 2012)

Lia Chisacof, Limba romana in secolul fanariot (= The Romanian Language during the Phanariot Era) (Editura Casa Cartii de Stiinta: Cluj-Napoca, 2012)

Lia Chisacof, ‘Citeva aspecte ale culturii populare in sec. al XVIII-lea romanesc’ (= ’Some aspects of popular culture in the Romanian 18th century’), in Polychronion. Essays in honour of the Romanian Byzantinist Nicolae-Serban Tanasoca, eds L. Chisacof and C. Vatasescu (Romanian Acdemy: Bucarest, 2012),pp. 123-135

Lia Chisacof, ‘Filigranul hârtiei produse în timpul primei domnii a lui Alexandru Ipsilanti’ (= ‘The watermark of the paper produced during the first reign of Alexander Hypsilantis in Wallachia’), in Limba Română LX.1-2 (2012), 25-31

Lia Chisacof, ‘Erudiţie sau pragmatism: manuale princiare în secolul al XVIII-lea românesc’ (= ‘Erudition or pragmatism : the princely handbooks of the Romanian 18th century’), in Armele Atenei In Honorem Zoe Petre, ed. D. Zaharia (Bucharest: Trei Publishing House, 2012), pp. 142-156

Lia Chisacof and Catalina Vatasescu eds, Polychronion. Essays in honour of Nicolae-Serban Tanasoca (Romanian Academy: Bucarest, 2012)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, Review of Julian Chrysostomides, Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453: Collected Studies, ed. by Michael Heslop and Charalambos Dendrinos (Ashgate: Farnham, 2011), in The Anglo-Hellenic Review 44 (Autumn 2011), 31-32

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘The City and the Cross: The Image of Constantinople and the Latin Empire in Thirteenth-Century Papal Crusading Rhetoric’, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 36 (2012), 20-37

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, Crusading in Frankish Greece: a Study of Byzantine-Western Relations and Attitudes, 1204-1282 (Brepols: Turnhout, 2013)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘Crusades and crusaders in Medieval Greece’, in A Handbook of Medieval Greece, eds P. Lock and N. Tsougarakis (Brill: Leiden, forthcoming 2013)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘New Frontiers: Frankish Greece and crusading in the early 13th century’, in Contact and Conflict in Frankish Greece and the Aegean, 1204-1453: Crusade, Religion and Trade between Latins, Greeks and Turks, eds N. Chrissis and M. Carr (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2013)

 Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘Gregory IX and the Greek East’, in Pope Gregory IX, eds C. Egger and D. Smith (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2014)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis and Mike Carr eds, Contact and Conflict in Frankish Greece and the Aegean, 1204-1453: Crusade, Religion and Trade between Latins, Greeks and Turks (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, forthcoming 2013)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘Tearing Christ’s Seamless Tunic? The “Eastern Schism” and Crusades against the Greeks in the Thirteenth Century’, in Proceedings of the Eighth Quadrennial Conference of the SSCLE (Cáceres, Spain, 25-29 June, 2012) (Cáceres: Extremadura University Press, forthcoming 2014)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘Byzantine Crusaders: Holy War and Crusade Rhetoric in Byzantine Contacts with the West (1095-1341)’, in The Crusader World, ed. A. Boas (Routledge: London, forthcoming 2015)

Nikolaos G. Chrissis, ‘Frankish Greece’, in The Cambridge History of the Crusades, vol. II: Expansion, Impact and Decline, eds J. Phillips and A. Jotischky (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2015)

Julian Chrysostomides, Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453, eds M. Heslop and Ch. Dendrinos, Variorum Collected Studies Series (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, VT, 2011)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Τo «περί των κατά χώραν Κύπρον σκαιών» έργο του αγίου Νεοφύτου Εγκλείστου’ (= ‘The work “On the misfortunes on the land of Cyprus” of Saint Neophytos the Recluse’), Διεθνές Συνέδριο: Άγιος Νεόφυτος ο Έγκλειστος. Ιστορία-Θεολογία-Πολιτισμός (Πάφος, 22-26 Απριλίου, 2009) (Paphos, 2010), pp. 529-557

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Ο Βίος και τα συγγράμματα του Αγίου Επιφανίου Κωνσταντίας (μὲ 1 Πίνακα)’ (= ‘The Life and writings of Saint Epiphanios of Constantia (with 1 Plate)’), in Διεθνές Επιστημονικὸ Συνέδριο: Άγιος Επιφάνιος Κωνσταντίας, Ιερὰ Μητρόπολις Κωνσταντίας (8-12 Μαΐου 2008 ) (Agia Napa-Paralimni, 2012), pp. 245-268

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Ο εκχριστιανισμός των Βουλγάρων σε δημώδες κείμενο από το Άγιο Όρος’ (= ‘The Christianisation of the Bulgars in a vernacular text from the Holy Mountain’), in Β΄ Επιστημονική Διημερίδα του Τομέα Αρχαίας και Μεσαιωνικής Ιστορίας, Ιωάννινα 14-15 Μαϊου 2010 (forthcoming)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Η Bιβλιοθήκη της ιεράς μονής Διονυσίου Αγίου Όρους’ (= ‘The Library of the holy monastery of Dionysios on the Holy Mountain’), Δωδώνη (in press)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Byzantine Scholars and the Union of the Churches’, in Festschrift in honour of Evangelos Chrysos (Athens, in press)

Costas N. Constantinides in collaboration with D. Agoritsas, ‘H δημώδης παράφραση του Βίου του οσίου Αθανασίου του Μετεωρίτου από τον Νεόφυτο Χριστόπουλο Ιβηρίτη’ (= ‘The paraphrasis in vernacular of the Life of Saint Athanasios of Meteora by Neophytos Christopoulos of Iveron’), in Πρακτικά του 9ου Συνεδρίου Τρικαλινών Σπουδών (in press)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Τα Χειρόγραφα της Βύλιζας. Μία επισκόπηση’ (= ‘The Manuscripts of Byliza. A review’), in Πρακτικά Επιστημονικής Ημερίδας: «Η Ιερά Μονή Βύλιζας στον Τόπο και τον Χρόνο» (in press)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘The Adventures of a Precious Constantinopolitan Μanuscript: Oxonii, Clarke 37’ (forthcoming)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Το Συναξάριον της Εκκλησίας Κωνσταντινουπόλεως καὶ η Κυπριακή Αγιολογία’ (= ‘The Synaxarion of the Church of Constantinople and Cypriot Hagiography’), in Πρακτικά του Α΄ Διεθνούς Συνεδρίου Κυπριακής Αγιολογίας (Παραλίμνι 8-12 Φεβρουαρίου 2012) (forthcoming)

Costas N. Constantinides, ‘Libraries and the re-editing of the Classical Texts in the early Palaeologan Period’, in Byzantine Manuscripts, Scholars and Teachers in the Palaeologan Period, ed. Ch. Dendrinos (Porphyrogenitus: Camberley, forthcoming 2014)

Charalambos Dendrinos, ‘Manuel II Palaeologus in Paris (1400-1402): Theology, Diplomacy and Politics’, in Greeks, Latins, and Intellectual History 1204-1500, eds M. Hinterberger and Ch. Schabel, Recherces de Théologie et Philosophie médiévales, Bibliotheca, 11 (Peeters: Leuven, 2011), pp. 397-422

Charalambos Dendrinos, ‘Palaiologan scholars at work: Makarios Makres and Joseph Bryennios’ autograph’, in From Manuscripts to Books: Proceedings of the International Workshop on Textual Criticism and Editorial Practice for Byzantine Texts (Vienna 10-11 December 2009), eds A. Giannouli and E. Schiffer, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Veröffentlichungen zur Byzanzforschung (Vienna,2011), pp. 23-51

Charalambos Dendrinos and Michael Heslop eds, Julian Chrysostomides. Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453, Variorum Collected Studies Series (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, VT, 2011)

Charalambos Dendrinos in collaboration with A. Cataldi Palau, M. Konstantinou-Rizos, S. McKendric, K. Palaiologos, V. Pasiourtides, Ph. Taylor, R. Turner and Ch. Wright, An electronic edition of George Etheridge’s unpublished autograph Encomium on King Henry VIII addressed to Queen Elizabeth I (1566) (British Library M. Royal 16 C X) (RHUL Hellenic Institute and the British Library, London, 2013), accessible online at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Hellenic-Institute/Research/Etheridge/

† Julian Chrysostomides and Charalambos Dendrinos eds, with Introduction by P.E. Easterling, Lexicon of Abbreviations & Ligatures in Greek Minuscule Hands (Porphyrogenitus: Camberley, in press)

Charalambos Dendrinos ed., Imperatoris Manuelis Palaeologi opera theologica, Corpus Christianorum, Series Graeca 71 (Brepols-Catholic University of Louvain: Turnhout-Louvain, in press)

Charalambos Dendrinos ed., Byzantine Manuscripts, Scholars and Teachers in the Palaeologan Period (Porphyrogenitus: Camberley, forthcoming 2014)

Charalambos Dendrinos ed., Political Friendship and Enmity: a Contribution towards the Understanding of Conflict in the Modern World (Porphyrogenitus: Camberley, forthcoming 2014)

Laura Franco, ‘Storia e mito di Costantino nelle fonti letterarie’, in L'editto di Milano e il tempo della tolleranza. Costantino 313 d.C., ed. G. Sena Chiesa , Exhibition Catalogue, Palazzo Reale (Milan, 2012), pp. 56-59

Laura Franco, Descriptions of reliquaries in L'editto di Milano e il tempo della tolleranza. Costantino 313 d.C., ed. G. Sena Chiesa , Exhibition Catalogue, Palazzo Reale (Milan, 2012): ‘Stauroteca con iscrizione greca e latina sulle due facce’, no 201, pp. 271-272; ‘Reliquiario a cassetta della Vera Croce’, no 210, p. 276; ‘Piccola croce reliquiario cosiddetta di Sant’Elena’, no 211, p. 276; ‘Reiliquiario della Santa Croce di Castignano’, no 212, p. 276-277; ‘Reliquiario di Sant’Elena, no 213, p. 277

David M. Gwynn, Athanasius of Alexandria: Bishop, Theologian, Ascetic, Father (Oxford University Press, 2012)

David M. Gwynn, The Roman Republic: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2012)

David M. Gwynn, ‘Episcopal Leadership’, in Oxford Handbook for Late Antiquity, ed. S.F. Johnson (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 876-915

Edith Hall with Richard Alston and Justine McConnell, Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbes to Hollywood (Oxford University Press, forthcoming)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Greeks at the Papal Curia in the fifteenth century: The case of George Vranas, Bishop of Dromore and Elphin’, in Greeks, Latins, and Intellectual History 1204-1500, eds M. Hinterberger and Ch. Schabel, Recherces de Théologie et Philosophie médiévales, Bibliotheca, 11 (Peeters: Leuven, 2011), pp. 423-438

Jonathan Harris, Costantinopoli, Italian translation of Constantinople: Capital of Byzantium by Laura Santi (Il Mulino: Bologna, 2011)

Jonathan Harris, Review of Judith Herrin and Guillaume Saint-Guillain eds, Identities and Allegiances in the Eastern Mediterranean after 1204 (Ashgate: Farnham and Burlington, 2011), in Anglo-Hellenic Review 44 (Autumn, 2011), 30

Jonathan Harris, Review of John Tolan, Gilles Veinstein and Henr Laurens, Europe and the Islamic World: A History (Princeton University Press: Princeton NJ, 2012) in History Today 63 (January, 2013), 57

Jonathan Harris, Review of James Howard-Johnston, Witnesses to a World Crisis: Historians and Histories of the Middle East in the Seventh Century (Oxford University Press, 2010) in Speculum 87 (2012), 881-2

Jonathan Harris with Catherine Holmes and E. Russell eds, Byzantines, Latins and Turks in the Eastern Mediterranean World after 1150, Oxford Studies in Byzantium (Oxford University Press, 2012)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Constantinople as City State, c.1360-1453’, in Byzantines, Latins and Turks in the Eastern Mediterranean World after 1150, eds J. Harris, C. Holmes and E. Russell,Oxford Studies in Byzantium (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 119-40

Jonathan Harris, ‘Collusion with the infidel as a pretext for western military action against Byzantium (1180-1204)’, in Languages of Love and Hate: Conflict, Communication and Identity in the Medieval Mediterranean, eds S. Lambert and H. Nicholson (Brepols: Leiden, 2012), pp. 99-117

Jonathan Harris with Dmitri Tolstoy, ‘Alexander III and Byzantium’, in Alexander III (1159-81): The Art of Survival, eds P.D. Clarke and A.J. Duggan (Ashgate: Farnham and Burlington, 2012), pp. 301-13

Jonathan Harris, Paperback edition of The End of Byzantium (Yale University Press: New Haven and London, 2012)

Jonathan Harris, La fine di Bisanzio, Italian translation of his The End of Byzantium by F. P. Terlizzi (Il Mulino: Bologna, 2013)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Best of enemies’, History Today 63 (February, 2013), 17-24

Jonathan Harris, ‘Manuel II Palaiologos (1391-1425) and the Lollards’, Greek Orthodox Theological Review (forthcoming, 2013)

Jonathan Harris, ‘The “Schism” of 1054 and the First Crusade’, Crusades (forthcoming, 2014)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Despots, emperors and Balkan identity in exile’, Sixteenth Century Journal (forthcoming, 2014)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Institutional Settings: the court, schools, church, and monasteries’, in The Cambridge Intellectual History of Byzantium, eds A. Kaldellis and N. Siniossoglou (Cambridge University Press, in progress)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Constantinople’, in Regeneration: a Literary History of Europe, 1348-1418, ed. D. Wallace (Oxford University Press, in progress)

Jonathan Harris, ‘Byzantium and the Latin States c.1095-c.1198/1204’, in The Cambridge History of the Crusades, vol. 1: Sources, Conquest and Settlement, eds M. Bull and Th. Madden (Cambridge University Press, in progress)

Michael Heslop and Charalambos Dendrinos eds, Julian Chrysostomides. Byzantium and Venice, 1204-1453, Variorum Collected Studies Series (Ashgate: Farnham-Burlington, VT, 2011)

Peregrine Horden, ‘What’s Wrong with Early Medieval Medicine?’, Social History of Medicine 24 (2011), 5-25, also accessible at http://shm.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/hkp052v1.pdf

Peregrine Horden, ‘Poverty, Charity, and the Invention of the Hospital’, in The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity, ed. S. Johnson (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 715-743

Peregrine Horden, ‘Situations Both Alike? Connectivity, the Mediterranean, the Sahara’, in Saharan Frontiers: Space and Mobility in Northwest Africa, eds J. McDougall and J. Scheele (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2012), pp. 25-38

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Homer and Contemporary Philosophy’, in The Homer Encyclopaedia, ed. M. Finkelberg (Wiley-Blackwell: Oxford, 2011), pp. 656-658

Ahuvia Kahane ed., Antiquity and the Ruin, special double issue of Revue europeéne d’histoire 18.5-6 (2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Image, Word, and the Antiquity of Ruins’, in Antiquity and the Ruin, ed. A. Kahane, Revue européenne d'histoire 18.5/6 (2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Ruins: An Introduction’, in Antiquity and the Ruin, ed. A. Kahane, Revue européenne d'histoire 18.5/6 (2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Politics and Psychoanalysis’, in Vicissitudes, eds. N. Segal and S. Kivland (Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of London: London, 2013)

Ahuvia Kahane with T. Rappoport, ‘Chaos and Social Order: A Theoretical Framework’ (in Hebrew), in Social Order and the Code of Informality, eds. A. Kahane and T. Rappoport (Resling Publishers: Jerusalem, 2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Asymmetry, Responsibility and Reciprocity’ (in Hebrew), in Social Order and the Code of Informality, eds. A. Kahane and T. Rappoport (Resling Publishers: Jerusalem, 2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, Chaos and the Code of Informality, (in Hebrew), eds. T. Rappoport and A. Kahane(Resling: Tel Aviv, 2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘The Dis-Continuity of Genre: Greece and Rome’, in Trends in Classics , Supplementary Volume 5, eds. F. Montanari and A. Rengakos (De Gruyter: New York, 2013)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Methodological Approaches to Greek Tragedy’, in The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Greek Tragedy, ed. H. Roisman (Wiley-Blackwell: Oxford, forthcoming 2013)

Ahuvia Kahane, ‘Postscript: Slavery, Abolition, Modernity, and the Past’, in Ancient Slavery and Abolition: From Hobbs to Hollywood, eds. E. Hall, R. Alston and J. McConnell (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 409-423

Ahuvia Kahane, Homer: A Guide to the Perplexed (Continuum: London, 2012)

Ahuvia Kahane, Epic, Novel, and the Progress of Antiquity (Bloomsbury: London, forthcoming 2012)

Kostas Kalimitzis, Taming Anger: The Hellenic Approach to the Limitations of Reason (Bristol Classical Press: London, 2012)

Christos Kremmydas, Review of M. DiltsDemosthenis orationes, tom. III (Oxford University Press, 2008), in Gnomon 82.2 (2010), 156-158

Christos Kremmydas, Review of A. Lanni, Law and Justice in the Courts of Classical Athens (Cambridge, 2006), in Classical Review 60.2 (2010), 483-485

Christos Kremmydas, ‘Greek Rhetoric’, in Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek History, eds R. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C. Champion, A. Erskine and S. Huebner (Wiley-Blackwell: Oxford, 2012)

Christos Kremmydas, Commentary on Demosthenes Against Leptines; with Introduction, Text, and Translation (Oxford University Press, 2012)

Christos Kremmydas, ‘Alexander the Great, Athens and the Rhetoric of the Persian Wars’, in The significance of the battle of Marathon, eds C. Carey and M.J. Edwards, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Supplement (London, forthcoming 2013)

Christos Kremmydas, ‘The Discourse of Deception and Characterization in Attic Oratory’, Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 53.1 (2013), 51-89

Chrysovalantis Kyriacou, ‘Από τον Όσιο Νεόφυτο τον Έγκλειστο στον Όσιο Σάββα τον Βατοπαιδινό: Ο προπαλαμικός Ησυχασμός στην Κύπρο και την Ανατολική Μεσόγειο (ca. 1200-ca.1350)’ (= ’From St Neophytos the Recluse to St Sabas of Vatopedion. Pre- Palamite Hesychasm on Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean ca.1200-ca.1350’), Κυπριακαὶ Σπουδαὶ (forthcoming)

Chrysovalantis Kyriacou, ‘Η Σαλαμίνα Χριστιανική Μητρόπολις Κύπρου (3ος -4ος αιώνας μ.Χ.)’ (= ‘Salamis: Christian Metropolis of Cyprus (3rd -4th century AD), Κυπριακαὶ Σπουδαὶ (forthcoming)

Georgios C. Liakopoulos, ‘Οθωμανικές επιγραφές της Χαλκίδας’ (= ‘Ottoman Inscriptions of Chalcis’), in Τουρκολογικά. Τιμητικός Τόμος για τον Αναστάσιο Κ. Ιορδάνογλου, ed. G. Salakides (Thessaloniki, 2011), pp. 63-160

Georgios C. Liakopoulos, A Study of the Early Ottoman Peloponnese in the Light of an Annotated editio princeps of the TT10-1/14662 Ottoman Taxation Cadastre (ca. 1460-1463) (The Royal Asiatic Society and Tarih Vakfı: London and Istanbul, in press)

Georgios C. Liakopoulos, ‘Οι οθωμανικές επιγραφές της Υπάτης (Badracık)’ (= ‘The Ottoman Inscriptions of Hypata (Badracık)’), in Proceedings of the 3rd Archaeological Meeting of Thessaly and Central Greece (University of Thessaly, Volos, 12-15 March 2009), ed. A. Mazarakis-Ainian (Hellenic Ministry of Culture and University of Thessaly: Volos, in press)

Georgios C. Liakopoulos and Theodore G. Palioungas, Οθωμανικές Επιγραφές της Λάρισας (= Ottoman Inscriptions of Larissa)(Thessaloniki, forthcoming)

Nick Lowe, Ed Sanders, Chiara Thumiger and Christopher Carey eds, Erôs in Ancient Greece (Oxford University Press,2013)

Anthony Luttrell, ‘La Chapelle de Frère Guillaume de Reillane à Sainte-Eulalie du Larzac’, Bulletin: Société de l’Histoire et du Patrimoine de l’Ordre de Malte xxiii (2010), 61-66

 Anthony Luttrell, ‘The Amalfitan Hospices in Jerusalem’, in Amalfi and Byzantium, ed. E. Farrugia (= Orientalia Christiana Periodica 287) (Rome, 2010), 105-122

Anthony Luttrell, ‘Juan Fernàndez de Heredia and the Compilation of the Aragonese Chronicle of the Morea’, in Deus Vult: Miscellanea di Studi sugli Ordini Militari, ed. C. Guzzo, vol. i (Tuscania, 2011), pp. 69-134

Anthony Luttrell, ‘Il Contributo femminile alle attività di assistenza dell’Ordine di San Giovanni nel Medioevo’, in Deus Vult: Miscellanea di Studi sugli Ordini Militari, ed. N. Bagnarini and C. Guzzo, vol. ii (Tuscania, 2012), pp. 5-11 (NB. with errors; proofs not corrected)

Anthony Luttrell, ‘Il Cavallo nell’Ordine dell’Ospedale a Rodi dopo il 1306’, in Cavalli e Cavalieri: Guerra, Gioco, Finzione, ed. F. Cardini and L. Mantelli (Pisa, 2011), pp. 205-215

Anthony Luttrell, ‘A Jerusalem Indulgence: 1100/3’, in On the Margins of Crusading: the Military Orders, the Papacy and the Christian World, ed. H. Nicholson (Farnham, 2011), pp. 5-11

Anthony Luttrell with K. Borchardt and E. Schoffler eds, Documents concerning Cyprus from the Hospital's Rhodian Archives: 1409-1459 (Nicosia, 2011)

 Anthony Luttrell, ‘Rhodes and Cyprus: 1409-1459’, in Documents concerning Cyprus from the Hospital's Rhodian Archives: 1409-1459, edsA. Luttrell with K. Borchardt and E. Schoffler (Nicosia, 2011), pp. xliii-xcii

Anthony Luttrell, ‘Early Drawings of Rhodian Buildings’, Bulletin: Société de l’Histoire et du Patrimoine de l’Ordre de Malte xxv (2011), 65-68

Anthony Luttrell and Elizabeth Zachariadou, ‘İlias Bey, the Emir of Menteşe within the Political Turmoil of 15th Century Western Anatolia’, reprint with facing Turkish translation, in Balat: İlias Bey Külıyeshi: Tarih, Mimari, Restorasyon / Ilyas Bey Complex: History, Architecture, Restoration, ed. M. Tanman and L. Elbirkik (Istanbul, 2011), pp. 19-29

Anthony Luttrell, ‘Smoke and Fire Signals at Rhodes: 1449’, in The Military Orders, 5: Politics and Power, ed. P. Edbury (Farnham, 2012), pp. 125-129

Alexandra Melita, ‘Female Practitioners of Magical Healing and their Networks (17th-18th centuries)’, in Spazi, poteri, diritti delle donne a Venezia in età moderna, eds A. Bellavitis, N. M. Filippini and T. Plebani (Verona, 2012), pp. 267-279

Janett Morgan, ‘Families and religion in classical Greece’, in Family and Household in Greece and Rome: A Companion, ed. B. Rawson (Oxford, 2011), pp. 447-464

Janett Morgan, ‘Drunken men and modern myths: searching for the andron in classical Greece’, in Sociable Man. Essays on Ancient Greek Social Behaviour in Honour of Nick Fisher, ed. S.D. Lambert (The Classical Press of Wales: Swansea, 2011), pp. 267-290

Janett Morgan., ‘At home with royalty: Constructing the Hellenistic palace’, in The Hellenistic Court, eds A. Erskine and L. Llewellyn-Jones (Classical Press of Wales: Swansea, forthcoming 2013)

Janett Morgan, Persia through the Looking Glass. Greek Representations of the Achaemenids and their Empire, Persian Perspectives: Studies in Ancient Iran (Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming 2013)

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Ρωμαίικη Ιστορία (αναθεωρημένη)’ (= ‘Romaic History [revised]’), Ηλιαία 65 (Αpril 2011), 36-39

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Με το νυ και με το σίγμα’ (= ‘With the nu and the sigma), Κυμοθόη 21 (2011), 193-199

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Στη δίνη του Γαλλο-τουρκικού πολέμου. Καταθέσεις ναυτιλλομένων, Αύγουστος-Οκτώβριος 1798’ (= ‘In the whirlwind of the Franco-Turkish war. Deposits of mariners, August-October 1798’), in Αχαΐα και Νότιος Ιταλία. Επικοινωνία, ανταλλαγές και σχέσεις από την Αρχαιότητα ώς σήμερα. Πρακτικά Συνεδρίου, Αίγιο 6-9 Ιουλίου 2008 (= Achaia and Southern Italy. Communication, exchanges and relations from Antiquity to the present. Conference Proceedings, Aigio 6-9 July 2008), eds L. Droulia and Α.D. Rizakis (Athens, 2011), pp. 418-429

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, Review ofPolyptychon / Πολύπτυχον, Homenaje a Ioannis Hassiotis – Αφιέρωμα στον Ιωάννη Χασιώτη, edsE. Motos Guirao and M.Morfakidis Filaktόs, Centro de Estudios Bizantinos, Neogriegos y Chipriotas (Granada, 2008), in Mediterranean Chronicle 1 (2011), 284-291

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Στρατιωτική υπηρεσία Ελλήνων στη βενετική Πελοπόννησο (14ος–15ος αιώνας)’ (= ‘Military service of Greeks in the Venetian Peloponnese’), in Ανοιχτοσύνη. Μελέτες προς τιμήν της Βασιλικής Παπούλια (= Openness. Studies in homour of Basiliki Papoulia), eds Th. Korres, P. Doukellis, S. Sfetas and F.I. Toloudi (Thessaloniki, 2012), pp. 309-321

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Ήρθανε χρόνια δίσεκτα’ (= ‘Leap years have arrived’), Ηλιαία 75 (February 2012), 28-30

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Κωνσταντινούπολη, 1453. Πολιτικό κλίμα και συντελεστές της Άλωσης’ (‘Constantinople, 1453. Political climate and contributors to the Fall’), Ηλιαία 78 (Μay 2012), 31-34

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Καζαντζάκης και Ιταλία. Το μαύρο, το κόκκινο και η αγιωσύνη’ (= ‘Kazantzakis and Italy. The black, the red and sanctity’), Ηλιαία 82 (Νοvember-December 2012), 29-32

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, ‘Ένα βιβλίο για την παρουσία των Καταλανών και Αραγωνίων στη μεσαιωνική Ελλάδα. Η Καταλανο-αραγωνική κυριαρχία στον ελληνικό χώρο.Αθήνα, Ινστιτούτο Cervantes, 2012, σσ.153’ (= ‘A book on the presence of the Catalans and Aragonese in mediaeval Greece. The Catalan-Aragonese domination in the Greek territory. Athens, Instituto Cervantes, 2012, 153pp.’), Ηλιαία 79 (July 2012), 31-33

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, Παναγία η Νικοποιός. Το παλλάδιο Κωνσταντινούπολης και Βενετίας. Παρουσίαση της μελέτης του Stefan Samerski, La Nikopeia, Ρώμη-Βενετία 2012 (‘The All Holy Virgin Nikopoios. The palladio of Constantinople and Venice. Presentation of the study by Stefan Samerski, La Nikopeia, Rome-Venice 2012’), Ηλιαία 80 (September 2012), 32-33

Nikolaos G. Moschonas, Review of Stefan Samerski, La Nikopeia. Immagine di culto, palladio, mito veneziano, Roma-Venezia, Centro tedesco di studi veneziani, 2012, pp. 125 (Veneziana, 10), in Archivio Veneto (2012), 143-148

Nikolaos G. Moschonas with the collaboration of Μ. Κardamitsis-Adamis and E. Beriatis, Αρχιτεκτονικά–Πολεοδομικά σχέδια Κεφαλονιάς στην περίοδο του Ιονίου Κράτους (= Architectural-City plans of Cephalonia in the period of the Ionian State)(Αthens, 2013)

Nikolaos Moschonas, ‘Το εμπόριο του λιναριού και του βαμβακιού στην Πελοπόννησο (14ος–15ος αι.)’ (= ‘The trade of linen and cotton in the Peloponnese [14th-15th c.]’), in Festschrift in honour of Spyros Troianos (forthcoming)

Fevronia Nousia, ‘Teaching Homer in fifteenth-century Byzantium: the case of Michael Lygizos’, in Byzantine Manuscripts, Scholars and Teachers, ed. Ch. Dendrinos (Porphyrogenitus: Camberley, forthcoming 2014)

Fevronia Nousia, ‘Transmission and Reception of Manuel Moschopoulos’ Schedography in the West’, in  Teachers, Students, and Schools of Greek in Renaissance Europe, eds. F. Ciccolella and L. Silvano (Brill: forthcoming 2014)

Jari Pakkanen and M.C. Lentini, ‘The Sanctuary to the West of the Santa Venera: a Review’, in Deliciae Fictiles IV: Architectural Terracottas in Ancient Italy. Images of Gods, Monsters and Heroes, eds. P.S. Lulof and C. Rescigno (Oxbow: Oxford-Oakville, 2010), pp. 417–425

Jari Pakkanen ‘Rekonstruktion des Säulenschafts’, in Der Asklepiostempel von Messene auf der Peloponnes. Untersuchungen zur hellenistischen Tempelarchitektur, ed. E.P. Sioumpara, Athenaia 1 (Hirmer Verlag: Munich, 2011), pp. 45-51, 266-267, 284-285

Jari Pakkanen, ‘Aegean Bronze Age Weights, Chaînes Opératoires, and the Detecting of Patterns through Statistical Analyses’, in Tracing Prehistoric Social Networks through Technology: a Diachronic Perspective on the Aegean, ed. A. Brysbaert (Routledge: London and New York, 2011), pp. 143-166

Jari Pakkanen with Maria Costanza Lentini, ‘Nouvelles découvertes sur l’agora de Naxos en Sicile’, in Tout vendre, tout acheter. Structures et équipements des marchés antiques. Actes du Colloque d’Athènes, 16-19 juin 2009, eds V. Chankowski and P. Karvonis (Bordeaux, 2012), pp. 153-161

Vasos Pasiourtides, ‘Theological encounters and cultural identity in Late Byzantium: Demetrios Chrysoloras’s unpublished fictitious dialogue refuting Demetrios Kydones’ Defence of Thomas Aquinas’, in Knotenpunkt Byzanz: Wissensformen und kulturelle Wechselbeziehungen. Akten der 37. Koelner Mediaevistentagung 14.17. September 2010, eds A. Speer and Ph. Steinkrüger, Miscellanea Mediaevalia 36 (Walter de Gruyter: Berlin and New York, 2012), pp. 431-438

Boris Rankov ed., Trireme Olympias: The Final Report. Sea Trials 1992-4. Conference Papers 1998 (Oxbow: Oxford, 2012)

Boris Rankov with D.J. Blackman et al., Shipsheds of the Ancient Mediterranean (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2013)

Ed Sanders, ‘”He is a liar, a bounder and a cad”: the arousal of hostile emotions in Attic forensic oratory’, in Unveiling Emotions: Sources and Methods for the Study of Emotions in the Greek World, ed. A. Chaniotis (Steiner Verlag: Stuttgart, 2012), pp. 359-387

Ed Sanders, ‘Beyond the usual suspects: literary sources and the historian of emotions’, in Unveiling Emotions: Sources and Methods for the Study of Emotions in the Greek World, ed. A. Chaniotis (Steiner Verlag: Stuttgart, 2012), pp. 151-173

Ed Sanders,  Chiara Thumiger, Christopher Carey and Nick Lowe eds, Erôs in Ancient Greece (Oxford University Press, 2013)

Ed Sanders, Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2014)

 Anne Sheppard ed., Ancient Approaches to Plato’s Republic, BICS Supplement, (Institute of Classical Studies:  London, forthcoming, April 2013)

Anne Sheppard, ‘Phantasia in De insomniis’, in Synesius.  De insomniis, ed. H.G. Nesselrath and D.A. Russell (SAPERE, Mohr Siebeck: Tübingen, forthcoming 2013)

Anne Sheppard, ‘Imagination’, in Companion to Ancient Aesthetics, ed. P. Destrée and P. Murray (Wiley-Blackwell:  Chichester, forthcoming 2014)

Anne Sheppard, ‘Literary theory and Aesthetics’, in All from One.  A Guide to Proclus, ed. P. dHoine and M. Martijn (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2014)

Anne Sheppard, ‘Proclus as Exegete’, in Interpreting Proclus, ed. S. Gersh (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2014)

Apostolos Spanos, ‘Political approaches to Byzantine liturgical texts’, in Approaches to the Text: Working with Texts from Antiquity to the Baroque, eds R. Eriksen and P. Young, Early Modern and Modern Studies (Fabrizio Serra Editore: Pisa and Rome, 2012) 

Apostolos Spanos,  ‘Was innovation unwanted in Byzantium?’, in Byzantium Wanted. The Desire and Rejection of an Empire, eds I. Nilsson and P. Stephenson, Studia Byzantina Upsaliensia 15 (Uppsala, forthcoming 2013) 

Apostolos Spanos,  ‘Menaion’, in Byzantine Codices in Liturgical context. A codico-liturgical approach to cataloguing Byzantine Christian manuscripts. I. The Athens CBM Meeting: Biblical, Liturgical and Hymnographical Codices, ed. S. Roye (Brepols: Turnhout, forthcoming 2013) 

Apostolos Spanos, ‘Political approaches to Byzantine liturgical texts’, in Approaches to the Text: Working with Texts from Antiquity to the Baroque, eds R. Eriksen and P. Young, Early Modern and Modern Studies (Fabrizio Serra Editore: Pisa and Rome, forthcoming 2013) 

Efi Spentzou and Richard Alston, Reflections of Romanity: Discourses of Subjectivity in Imperial Rome, Classical Memories/Modern Identities (Ohio State University Press, 2011)

Efi Spentzou, ‘Modernist revisions of return: home and domesticity in Seferis’ and Ritsos’ Nostos’, in Nostos: Odyssean Identities in Modern Cultures, eds H. Gardner and S. Murnaghan(Ohio State University Press: forthcoming, Spring 2014)

Efi Spentzou, The Roman Poetry of Love: Elegy and Politics in the Time of Augustus (Bloomsbury Academic: forthcoming, Autumn 2013)

Efi Spentzou, ‘Philhellenic imperialism and the invention of the Classical past: 21st century re-imaginings of Odysseus in the Greek War for Independence’, in Ancient Greek Myth and Modern War Conflict, eds E. Hall and K. Billotte (forthcoming)

Christos Triantafyllopoulos, ‘The Thomist Basis of Prochoros Kydones’ anti-Palamite Treatise De essentia et operatione Dei and the Reaction of the Byzantine Church’, in Knotenpunkt Byzanz: Wissensformen und kulturelle Wechselbeziehungen. Akten der 37. Koelner Mediaevistentagung 14.17. September 2010, eds A. Speer and Ph. Steinkrüger, Miscellanea Mediaevalia 36 (Walter de Gruyter: Berlin and New York, 2012), pp. 411-429

Christos Triantafyllopoulos, ‘Late Byzantine Attitudes towards Union between the Greek and the Latin Churches: the case of Makarios, Metropolitan of Ankyra (1397-1405)’, in Réduire le schisme? Ecclésiologies et politiques de l’Union entre Orient et Occident (XIIIe-XVIIIe siècles), eds M.-H. Blanchet and F. Gabriel (Paris, forthcoming 2013)

David Wiles, Theatre and Citizenship: the History of a Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2011)

David Wiles, ‘Education for citizenship: the uses of Antigone’, Logeion 1 (2011), 1-8

David Wiles and Christine Dymkowski eds, The Cambridge Companion to Theatre History (Cambridge University Press, 2012)

David Wiles, ‘Education for citizenship: the uses of Antigone’ (in Greek translation), in Reception of Ancient Greek Drama & Education, eds N. Merkouri, P. Mavromoustakos, H. Shoenmakers and L. Hardwick (forthcoming)

David Wiles, ‘Oedipus: the chronotope’, in Close Relations: the Spaces of Greek and Roman Theatre, eds J. Griffiths and P. Monaghan (Cambridge Scholars: Cambridge, forthcoming)

Christopher Wright, ‘Byzantine authority and Latin rule in the Gattilusio lordships’, in Byzantines, Latins and Turks in the Eastern Mediterranean World after 1150, eds C. Holmes, E. Russell and J. Harris (Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 247-263

Christopher Wright, The Gattilusio Lordships in the Aegean World, 1354-1462 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming)

Barbara Zipser, Review of Ch. Bourbou, Health and Disease in Byzantine Crete (7th- 12th Centuries AD) (Ashgate, 2010), in Medical History 56/04 (2012), 586-587

Barbara Zipser, ‘Magic, Infidelity and Secret Annotations in a Cypriot Manuscript of the Early Fourteenth Century (Wellcome MSL 14)’, in Dreams, Healing, and Medicine in Greece: From Antiquity to the Present, ed. St. Oberhelman (Ashgate, forthcoming, 2013)

Barbara Zipser and F. Markowetz, ‘Cancerous cells, Neanderthal DNA and the tradition of Byzantine medicine. Textual criticism in philology and genomics’, in Medical Books in the Byzantine World, ed. B. Zipser (Eikasmos Online II, forthcoming)

Barbara Zipser, Review of M. Ullmann, Untersuchungen zur arabischen Überlieferung der Materia medica des Dioskurides. Mit Beiträgen von Rainer Degen (Wiesbaden, 2009), in Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft (forthcoming)

Barbara Zipser ed., Medical Books in the Byzantine World (Eikasmos Online II, forthcoming)

 

Five-Year Plan (2013-2018): The Hellenic Institute will continue its efforts to further promote its teaching and research activities, covering the whole span of Greek history and culture, by securing funds for the establishment of further lectureships, studentships and awards. In particular it will intensify its efforts to promote the study of Modern Greek History by securing funds for the establishment of a Lectureship in Modern Greek History with emphasis on Anglo-Hellenic Relations (19th-20th c.) and a Lectureship in Greek Maritime History (18th-20th c.). It will also promote the study of the Greek Diaspora worldwide. The Institute will also continue its close collaboration with universities, research centres and other institutions in Britain and abroad, through exchange programmes and collaborative projects and conferences.

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